How to install Google Tag Manager on Wix (feat. Mike Sale)

Wix is a popular website builder that makes website building easy. But what about website tracking? If you install Google Tag Manager you should be able to quickly take your tracking to the next level. In this video Mike is going to show you how to install GTM on a Wix website.

đź”— Links:

Sign up to Wix – https://www.wix.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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In this video, Mike is going to show you how you can install Google Tag Manager on a Wix website. All and more coming up.

Hello there. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. But today we have Mike Sale from michaelsale.com on this channel to show us how we can install Google Tag Manager on to a Wix website. Now spoiler alert, you will need to have an upgraded account in order to do this. But if you’re serious about building your website on the Wix system then you’ve probably done this already. Now, Mike is actually gonna show us in multiple videos how you can then take the next steps of installing Google Analytics, Facebook Ads, or the tracking for Google Ads on to this account. So definitely subscribe to this channel down below because there are new videos coming out every week. Now we got lots to cover. So Mike, take it away.

Hello, Julian, thank you very much. Hi, everyone. This is Mike from Michaelsale.com. And we’re going to show you today how to install Google Tag Manager on your Wix website. So to do that, we need to validate two key prerequisites from your Wix.com account perspective. So you need to go into your site dashboard, and validate that you have a plan here a premium plan, or basically a plan that does not say free, if it says free. Under this location, you’re going to need to upgrade your plan. It can be the smallest lowest that you could possibly have. But it just needs to be not free. The other one is that you need to have your domain connected. Your domain is your website address like for example, Michaelsale.com, or in this case, Michael.sale, it will handle anything in terms of domains, like for example, that .com .net, .gov, .org,

all those will work just fine. Once those two prerequisites within Wix are met, you need to go to tagmanager.Google.com. In TagManager.Google.com will require that you actually have a Google account, that Google account will be used to login and create a business account or a company account within Google Tag Manager. So to do that, we’re going to go ahead and click Create Account. And this is where I’m going to put in my company name.

And then I’m going to go ahead and create a container, that container is your site. In this case, it’s going to be Michael.sale, right? And what kind of container will you need for your Wix website? Well, guess what? It’s a web container, no big shocks there. Let’s go ahead and make sure that we select web container. And that will now allow us to create both our account that’s our company, as well as our container which is our website.

We now have to go ahead and select the terms of service agreement.

And now Google tells us that we need to install Google Tag Manager by copying and pasting in some code into our website. Wix has a special integration just for Wix that allows you to only take the container ID and copy that.

You can also find that tag that container ID right here. And we’re going to go back over to Wix.

Now that we’ve got both our tag manager container setup and our Wix connected domain, and premium plan, we can go over to where it says marketing tools. Under marketing tools down at the bottom, you will see marketing integrations. Under marketing integrations, you’ll see Google Analytics Facebook Pixel, Google Tag Manager. Google Tag Manager allows us to manage all of these other tags and more beyond what may be set up for marketing integrations within your Wix website. So we’re going to use Google Tag Manager to do that. So we’re going to connect Google Tag Manager, as you see up in the upper right. Click that and it will ask you for your tag manager ID basically your container ID. We’re going to paste that in and hit save. Now,

our Wix website is connected to that particular container. What that means is that that snippet of code Wix is actually taken that snippet of code and put it into place for us on our Wix website.

Now, we need to validate and understand if we actually have that Tag Manager properly installed on our website. So right now this is this is the plain Jane website that I’ve set up just for this demonstration.

And we’re going to go into a special mode that allows us to see

what it would be like if we were to publish this particular setup or this initialization on our website. So to do so we’re going to go ahead and go into preview mode. Preview mode is exclusive to this particular web browser. So now what we’re going to need to do now we’re in preview mode, we’re going to go back over to our website, and we’re going to do a hard reset. So we’re going to go ahead and reload the page.

And what will pop up at the bottom here is the Tag Manager preview window. This allows us to look not just at whether or not we’ve installed Google Tag Manager. But have we set up the tags within Google Tag Manager correctly and are they firing where we expect to fire them at what events we have all that good information. So understanding this will show you that there are no tags. But we can go ahead and set that up right now in Google Tag Manager. The other way we can validate and verify this is using something called the tag assistant. This is a Google Chrome assistant, Google Chrome extension. And Google Tag assistant will actually tell you Yep, when I look at this, and this is only in the preview mode, I can actually see that this is up and running, that Tag Manager is there. And it does not currently have any tags but the Tag Manager is installed. And you can see that this is the code snippet.

And we can now go back and turn off preview mode or leave preview mode.

When we do that, what you’ll find is if you go back over to our website, and we reloaded again,

you’ll see that the Google Tag assistant first of all the window down below that tells us about what things would be like if we were to publish this container is gone. And number two, you’ll see that Google Tag Manager is there. But it is it’s it’s not quite correctly set up something’s wrong.

So we need to go over to Google Tag Manager. And we need to publish or submit our container. So now that we’ve seen it in preview mode, everything is working as we expect, we’re going to go to submit this particular container. And in this case, we’re just going to initialize the install of Google Tag Manager.

You can put anything you want here in the description of what it is. And when we hit Publish.

Now, we’ll see that we have this version that has been published. Tells you when, there are no tags installed yet. We can install tags for Google Analytics.

You can see those tags right here. Google Analytics, Google Ads, remarketing. There’s also not just google tags, but for example, the

Facebook Pixel, LinkedIn, and a variety of different tags that have nothing to do with Google whatsoever. We’re not going to do that yet. We’ll do that in a subsequent video, we just want to verify that the live version of Google Tag Manager is now running on our Wix website. So we’re going to come back over to our website, do another hard refresh. And now what you could see is the Google Chrome tag assistant is showing us that we do have the Google Tag Manager is now in a green state and is working properly.

Next, we will need to go ahead and add new tags, for example, Google Analytics. And Julian, I know that you have plenty of videos and tutorials that will help people understand how to do that. So at this point, I’m going to go ahead and hand it back off to you. Thanks, everyone, Mike from MichaelSale.com signing off. Bye.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can install Google Tag Manager on a Wix website. Thank you, Mike for explaining this to us. And if you want to follow along with the next videos that are going to come out in the series, then definitely subscribe to our channel right over there. Now, my name is Julian. See you in the next one.

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Delay Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager (feat. Ahmad Kanani)

Delaying the Facebook Pixel from firing when the user enters the website will have the effect of filtering out any user who isn’t really interested in what you have to offer. We can implement such a delay with the help of Google Tag Manager. In this video we’re going to find out how.

đź”— Links:

Timer Trigger for Google Tag Manager: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7gqv7ASSAE

How to Build a Scroll + Timer Trigger with Google Tag Manager https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71pCKRouabc

Siavak – http://siavak.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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In this video, Ahmad is going to show you how you can delay your Facebook pixel to build a higher quality audience in your Facebook ads. All and more coming up.

Hello there. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. But today we have Ahmad from Siavak.com on the channel. He is the web analytics specialist there. And he’s going to show us how we can refine our Facebook audience by delaying our Facebook pixel. So in the end, we have a higher quality audience to do for example retargeting to. Now, we got lots to cover. So Ahmad take it away.

Thanks, Julian. My name is Ahmad and I’m the web analytics especially sets your work. Today I’m going to create a Facebook audience of people who have stayed at least five seconds on my webpage. The reason I’m doing that is because it gives me a better quality audience by excluding those who have clicked on a link by mistake or just closed the page immediately and didn’t have the chance to even look at the page or see the branding or see the offer on the page. We can use this audience for retargeting purposes. And hopefully we can get better results by advertising to a better quality audience.

Let’s begin by creating our base Facebook tag. For this, let’s go to tag manager and create a new custom HTML tag. I’m clicking on the tag, new, and then see HTML for custom HTML, and then Facebook based pixel. Now,

I use the custom HTML as a tag type and copy paste my code, my pixel code from Facebook to the tag itself. Now, I want the Facebook base tag to fire immediately on all pages. So I set the trigger to all pages and safety Facebook base pixel. That was easy was it. Let’s preview the tag and see how it actually performs on our website.

Now, Google Tag Manager is in preview mode. And we can go back to our website and refresh the page. As you can see, our custom HTML Facebook based pixel has fired one time. And here in my Facebook pixel helper, I can also see that the page view of its my pixel has been fired.

Now, let’s create a custom some events for this Facebook pixel that fires five seconds after the page load. For this, let’s go to Google Tag Manager. And first of all create a trigger. We want to create a trigger that fires five seconds after the page load. Luckily for us, there is a built in trigger inside Google Tag Manager which is a timer trigger. We can choose the trigger type as timer, put the interval, which is 5000 milliseconds which is equals five seconds, and then limit it to fire only once. If we put 10 here, this trigger fires every five seconds for 10 times, but we only needed to fire once. Now, we need to set the conditions for this trigger. We want this trigger to fire on all pages. That’s why I’m going to set whenever the page path matches regular expression.star. And .star in regular expression means basically everything. Okay, so this time a trigger fires just once after five seconds on all pages.

Let’s give it a name, timer five seconds and save it. Now, we have our timer. Let’s go to tag and create a tag that fires the Facebook event. Tags a new tag. Again, this is a custom HTML tag for Facebook and it fires after five seconds.

For the tag configuration, we choose the custom HTML tag type. And here we need to type exactly like this. First of all, because it’s a piece of JavaScript, and then fbq track custom because it’s a custom event that we’ve created. It’s not one of the standard Facebook events. And we can name it whatever we want. In this case, let’s use five seconds, so we can identify in Facebook ads interface. Now, we’re going to link this tag to the trigger that we’ve just built. So this piece of code fires five seconds after each page load. Let’s save it.

And let’s preview our container. We can either hit preview button here, or hit refresh while we’re on the preview mode. Now, let’s go back to the website and refresh the page.

As you can see, we only have the Facebook base pixel. And then just after five seconds, this new tag fires. If we look at the page view, we can see that the base pixel and these other tag they fired on the page view but five seconds after that GTM timer has fired and with that our five seconds tag has fired. If you check the Facebook pixel however, we can also see that page view has fired and also our five seconds new event.

Now that we have created our events and pixel base pixel, and we are seeing that they are firing and Facebook pixel helper is showing that they’re firing. We also need to go to Facebook to ensure that Facebook is receiving these events. Now here in Facebook events manager, I’m in the test Events tab. Okay. And as you can see, it’s receiving activity, it’s receiving page views. And it’s also receiving five seconds events. If I clear the activity and refresh this page again, and come back here. We can see in real time that first it received the page view. And after five seconds, it receives our five seconds event. Ok.

Now, the final piece that we need to ensure is to come to Google Tag Manager. And for our Facebook base pixel said something names tag firing proceed because we always want our base pixel which contains the initiation part of the Facebook pixel to happen before any other events that we send afterwards. We need to click on Advanced setting and give a higher number like 10 to detect firing priority and then saved the tag.

Any tag with higher priority fires before any other tag with lower priority. So in this case, our base pixel always fires before our event because this is just a piece of code that needs the initiation pixel to be there in order to perform.

Now that we have our tag and triggers set up properly, we can go back to our Facebook Ads Manager within the Facebook pixel interface and create create audiences.

We choose the accounts, we choose the pixel. And then we can choose to create an audience of people who have stayed for more than five seconds for at least five seconds. And then we can set for how many days do we want this audience go. So the people who have stayed for five years seconds in the last seven days. You can give the audience a name and save it.

That’s it. Now it’s time for you to go and try it out yourself. Thank you for watching. Bye.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can delay your Facebook pixel to in the end build a higher quality audience. Now if you liked this video, then definitely give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian til next time.

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Cross-Domain Tracking with Google Tag Manager

Cross Domain Tracking for Google Analytics needs to be installed if you have two separate domains you want to connect to one Google Analytics account. We will utilize GTM to install this on our website and test if it’s working.

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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Google Ads Website Call Conversion Tracking with GTM

Call Extensions are extra snippets you can add to your paid Google Ads to display a phone number directly on the ad. But what if the user comes to the page and sees a different ad? You can use the Website Call Conversion Tracking feature to automatically change around the number on your website so it displays the number the user saw on the ad and that way transfer conversion information to Google Ads. In this video, I’m going to show you how to accomplish this with GTM.

đź”— Links:

Google Help: https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/6095882?co=ADWORDS.IsAWNCustomer%3Dfalse&hl=en

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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In this video, I’m going to show you how you can install the call conversion tracking feature of Google Ads onto your website with the help of Google Tag Manager. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measure geeks, Julian here back with another video for you guys. On this channel, we do all about data analytics and marketing. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing down below. Today, we want to talk about the call conversion tracking feature of Google Ads and how to install this on to our website. Now, what is this called conversion tracking feature? If you have a search result, just like on a search result in Google on your mobile phone, you might notice that there’s a phone number that you can actually click and then are connected to the advertiser directly. But what if the user clicks on the search result then goes to the website and you have a different phone number displayed there, but Google Ads gives us a call conversion tracking code for our website that can change this dynamically. So it mimics whatever is on the ad, we just have to install it. And today, I’m going to show you how to do this with the help of Google Tag Manager. So fire up your Google Tag Manager and your ads account. And we’re going to get started right now.

Welcome back to our demo shop on this demo shop, I have installed a phone number right here that can be called by our customers. And if the customer actually goes through Google AdWords and comes to the page, he might have seen an ad just like this one, where there is a call extension feature. So the user can click on this button and then be connected with us right away, these features can be installed, they are not available for every country. But if you go into your Google Ads account on the ad extensions, you can look, if you are able to install them right here, you can create a call extension, this will give you a number by Google, which will then connect right to your phone.

And if the user calls through Google while he’s still on Google, this can be counted as a conversion. Now obviously, if the user clicks on the ad itself and comes to our page, he will be greeted with a completely different version of the number. And this is where Google AdWords wouldn’t be able to count this to a converted user. But luckily, they gave us a tracking code that we can install that mimics whatever number is called right here and ports that over to the number and replace actually the number right here. So we will be able to still track conversions in Google AdWords. So let’s install this with the help of Google Tag Manager. First of all, what you would need is to have a call extension already running, then you can go ahead and go to Tools up here. And under conversions, we can set up a call conversion. So go to the plus button. And we already greeted with a tracking field for phone calls. And then we have three options here. And we will go with the option to track calls that actually happened on our website. So right here we gonna go with continue.

And we can give this all a name. We can choose a category lead is fine with me. But you might want to change this based on your website. We can assign our conversion of value, I won’t do this for now. And decide if you want to count every call that comes from a user or count the user as converted one time, I will go with every. And then there are other configurations such as when you want to count a user has converted. If the call length is longer than 60 seconds to conversion window is 30 days, and choose whether you want to include this in conversions. And also, you can choose the attribution modeling here. Don’t worry, you can always change them later on if you choose so. Let’s go ahead and create and continue. And then it will ask us how do we want to install us in our case, we want to install with Google Tag Manager. And it will give us a conversion ID and the conversion label. Now, in order to install this, we need to install a new tag that’s called Google Ads conversion tracking which is actually not quite right anymore because they already have a new tag template, which we’ll gonna use. And then also make sure you have the conversion linker tag enabled on your page. So let’s go ahead and set this up. We’ll go over to Google Tag Manager. And here we’re going to go with a new tag that we want to install. And this will be our Google Ads

Call extension tag. We’re going to find this on all pages as our phone number is on all pages of our website. But you might want to restrict this, if you just have the phone number on a certain page. Now as a tag configuration, we’re not choosing the Google Ads conversion tracking, but rather the call tracking which is a new template, which is a little bit down the page here. If you can’t find it just like me, then you might want to utilize the search functionality up here. But here we go. It’s a Google Ads calls for website conversion. This is we’re going to use and then we need to enter the phone number that is displayed on our website. And this needs to be exact because the script will actually look through the website and try to find these numbers and then replace them.

So we’re going to copy this and put us in right here. Then we need a conversion ID and the conversion label which we have right here. So let’s copy this and set up the trigger which is simplicity all pages trigger. We’ll save this. And before we test this, we’re also going to configure our conversion linker tag for Google Ads.

This tag will also be deployed on all pages, as it’s a tag to ensure that our information when the user comes from Google is correctly written to the cookie. So here we go, we already have the conversion link attack. If you have cross-domain tracking, you might want to enable this but in most cases, you will need us and we can go ahead and simply triggers on all pages. Simple as that. Now, let’s go into our preview and debug mode which will put our browser into a special mode. And if you go back to our page and reload it.

We can now see our Google Ads call extension and our conversion linker has been deployed correctly. If you have the tag assistant by Google installed, you’ll also see a new tag website called metrics. This should be deployed. Now in order to test this correctly and see if data is received in your tool, you will actually need to click on an ad and see if the phone number changes. But there’s also another trick to see if this actually works. And this is by entering a piece of code at your URL which is the hash and then Google WCC debug. This will put your browser and the code will recognize this little snippet into a special mode. So when we go ahead and reload this.

And we’re going to close down our tag assistant here we should see some. Now, this sometimes doesn’t work because it’s cached. So we’re going to go to another page here. Let’s enter our code again, Google minus WCC minus debug, and reload.

And this time, here we go. We should see if we minimize this a little window here where our Google Ads website call conversion will try to replace this phone number. So we can click on force here. And we see our phone number has been replaced. So the code actually works and would change your phone number. In the instance, if somebody came through a call extension ad through Google. But again, if you want to make sure that this is working correctly, you would need to click on your own ad in order to see the phone number being replaced. Now that we have these two tags installed, we can go ahead and submit a version and publish this to a version that all our users will now be tracked. And this is how you can install call conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager.

Yes, that’s right. This is how you can install Google Ads call conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager. If you run into any problems or if you have any questions, please give there’s a shout out down below in the comments. And if you liked this video, then we have tons more on this channel. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian. See you in the next one.

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đź”´ New GTM Feature: Trigger Groups

Trigger Groups are the newest edition to Google Tag Manager. Let’s take a look at this new feature.

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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In this video, we’re going to talk about the new Google Tag Manager feature of trigger groups. All and more coming up.

Hello there measurers. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and today we want to talk about the new Google Tag Manager feature of trigger groups. Now, what are trigger groups exactly? It is just that a new trigger type where you can take your existing triggers and put them into a group. Now all of these triggers need to turn true for your trigger group to turn true. And if you have that attached to a tag, then new tag would fire.

This is particularly helpful if we wanted to have some kind of control structure where we pieced together our control structure from different triggers. I’m going to show you an example right now on how you can utilize this.

So let’s dive in. Here we are on our demo shop. And we have a landing page here. And on this landing page, I want to fire a tag when the user scrolls down this long landing page and actually reads it. So I would utilize a timer trigger to fire up, for example, on five-second mark.

But then also a scroll trigger to fire on the 50% mark. Now, if both of these conditions turn true previously, then I want to fire our tag. So what tag are we talking about. We are here in our Google Tag Manager account under tags, I have a GA scroll event tag. And now I need to attach a trigger to it. And if I will just take our triggers of the scroll 50% and the timer trigger 50% and attach it to the tag, these would evaluate actually or underneath each other. So that would mean that if we attached them to the tag, either, when the five second timeout would fire or the 50% mark would fire our tag would fire so it would find actually two times which is not desirable. We want to combine them and this is where these new trigger, the new trigger type of trigger groups come in.

So we go here on new, and we can choose this new trigger group right here. And let’s name this correctly. So this is a group for our scroll and our time, five second time. And we’re going to attach our existing triggers that we have the time, the trigger that have prepared beforehand, and our scroll trigger right here.

Now you can optionally put in another condition. So this would be a third condition not really a trigger, but the condition for that trigger group to put in and say that it should only trigger in these certain circumstances. But since we have these triggers inside already, we should be able to make this work within just the trigger.

So I’ll just go with all conditions. And I’m going to save this year. So now we have a new group, scroll and time a trigger.

Just to show you the other triggers that I have set up beforehand. So this is a normal titled trigger that will fire upon the five second mark. And then I also have a scroll trigger that fires on the 50% vertical scroll. So if I’ve scrolled 50% down, it should fire. Now this is now attached to a trigger group. So we have a new kind of relation between triggers in each other, that is something to look out for.

But this should do it, we have it now prepared, and we can attach it to our Google Analytics, scroll trigger tag. Now this isn’t just a tag test tag, it’s not really a Google Analytics tag. I just wanted to test this and put this into a new group.

Let’s save this and refresh our page. Okay, so we’re here on our landing page, which is pretty long. I’m going to reload this. And now I’m going to start reading the text. And before I hit the 50% mark, the GTM time as you see down below here has already fired so the five seconds are up. And once we hit the 50% mark of our scroll trigger, we should have another event which is our GTM scroll depth so we had 50% now. And then our whole triggered group turn true, which is the new trigger type of trigger group. So a new event here in the data layer, and our scroll event, track tag fired.

So not on the individual events of the triggers had fired. But on our new GTM trigger group. Let’s make a negative test here. Let’s say I’m just a casual user coming to the landing page and scrolling down really fast, should be already at hundred percent now. Our scroll trigger fired, our timer only fired after five seconds. So you would have these combined, if both of them turn true. That’s important to understand.

Okay, obviously, I would play with the time if you really want to make this this work and also the scroll depth. But you could if you increase the time, filter out all those people who don’t take longer than 30 seconds to actually to read to the half or the bottom of the page.

So you can make your scroll trigger more accurate. We have another video on this at use a little bit different method but here you exactly the differences here because we can utilize two trigger types in order to combine them to one with our trigger group.

Another example that is common nowadays is to use cookie consent pop up. So we have one right here where you would allow cookies that would set a cookie and your browser we have here on the application in the developer tools, we have a new cookie that is now put into where is it?

Okay, there’s no cookie yet because I haven’t allowed it yet. But if I click allow cookies, we should have a new cookie here, which is our consent status allow. Now I’ve built simply a variable that is a first party cookie that reads this cookie. So I will be able to see in my developer tools here ahhh my in my variables that the allow cookie consent is denied or is true.

Right now it’s deny. If I reload it should be cookie consent status true. And then I could build a trigger of that which I have already on. So here’s allow, which I’ve already done. In the triggers is cookie consent status allow.

So this is a normal page view trigger with a cookie consent status contains allow. Now, if I combine this, for example, let’s say I want to only fire up my facebook pixel not on all pages, but on all pages only if the user has already allowed this cookie, then let’s go ahead and build this into a group. So we’ll be able to first of all, look at the cookie consent status. And then if this is true fire on our pages. Let’s try this out going on to the trigger and building a new group trigger for our page view and our cookie allow.

So this is what we’re going to combine, we’re going to have the page view trigger, and no not the page view trigger in a group. So it’s going to trigger groups, build a new page view trigger on all pages, and also attach our cookie consent allow right here. So these two conditions need to be true in order for it to fire. Let’s save this, go back to our facebook pixel.

And only fire this on our group. So I’m going to get rid of the all pages trigger, and instead use our group for our page view allow. Let’s save this and refresh. Go back to our page here. And the two conditions of the two triggers will be evaluated and then our trigger group should fire and our pixel is allowed. Now, let me get rid of this little cookie here. Cookie consent status allow, then Select. OK, let’s close this and go back to the page.

Now if I reload, or if I go to the page, normally, we should see that our page you fired, our GTM tag fired and so on. But our facebook pixel has not yet fire because we have not yet allowed this consent. Even if you go to the next page and the next page and the next page until the user actually clicks this allow cookie. So now it’s allowed and the next page view would then actually fire the facebook pixel.

So this is how, let’s see, Yes, here it does. Click the something. Okay, the trigger group is now facebook pixel has fired. So this is how you can utilize your consent cookie as well. And put this into a group in order for your tags that you want to have fired only if consent is given, you can do that.

They are obviously different other methods of doing this now. But this, this whole group trigger thing actually gives us more flexibility. In order to have different methods available. We could also put this into a variable, we could put this into the trigger itself, we could use tag sequencing. So many different forms of the firing the trigger and making sure that only when the consent status is given our tags would fire.

And there’s also a method of doing this on the tracking side itself. So in the tracking code itself, Facebook actually has a feature for that. We have a video on that as well on how to make use of that.

But if you have a special case where you want to utilize different trigger conditions, and you already have these triggers set up, I think this is a very helpful feature that makes our life a bit more flexible and easy in certain circumstances of all costs. All right, if you have any other use cases for this new trigger type of trigger groups, I’d love to hear from you. I just came up with some of these on the spot and wanted to present them and get this new video out there right away so you will be up to date. If you want to stay up to date with all and everything that we do here on this channel, then definitely hit that subscribe button right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian till next time.

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Best Google Tag Manager Blogs and Resources | Lesson 7 (GTM for Beginners)

We have come to the end of our Google Tag Manager for Beginners Series. In today’s video, let’s recap everything that we have discussed and I will also share with you my favorite resources that will guide you throughout your future GTM journey.

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đź”— Links:

GTM Resource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide

Playlist of the full GTM for Beginners course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPEdkc_feNM&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHGni1H-mz2P7lbZ7PmAn1B

Simo Ahava’s blog: https://www.simoahava.com/

Bounteous blog: https://www.bounteous.com/insights/

Official Google Help: https://support.google.com/tagmanager/

Google Help Forum: https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!forum/tag-manager

Analytics Academy: https://analytics.google.com/analytics/academy/

GTM for Beginners+ (Challenges) course: https://www.udemy.com/google-tag-manager-for-beginners/?couponCode=YOUTUBE

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

đź‘Ť FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this last lesson of our GTM for beginners series, we are going to recap our course, what we have learned so far. And then I’m going to give you my favorite resources to deepen your knowledge in Google Tag Manager. All and more coming up.

Hello there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. Unfortunately, we are already at our last lesson of our GTM for beginners course. So sad. Well, your journey with Google Tag Manager has just begun. And therefore I want to quickly recap what we have learned so far. And then you can be sure to dive into our resources, my favorite resources that I will show you today to deepen your knowledge in the field of Google Tag Manager. There’s loads more to discover on this channel, of this channel, and on the inter webs so I’m going to give you my resources where I usually look for inspiration. Now we got lots to cover. So let’s dive in. In the past six lessons, we have taken our first steps in tag management with the help of Google Tag Manager. Now let’s recap really quickly what we have learned in these few videos. In our first video, I gave you a quick overview on the core functionality of Google Tag Manager and introduce you to the main features that make it a great tool for managing your marketing tags. In the second lesson, we learned about the correct installation of Google Tag Manager, how to open up an account and place the tracking code correctly, so everything works and Google Tag Manager is installed. Then in our third lesson, we went through the very important step of planning and auditing our existing installation so we can port it over to Google Tag Manager. And here’s where I introduce you to our tag plan template that we continue to use throughout these lessons.

In less than four, we dove into the actual tag deployments and migrated our existing tracking over to Google Tag Manager according to our tag plan. We ensured everything is working and finished up our implementation with a quick check if our tags are working correctly. In the lesson number five, we extended our tracking by installing conversion tracking which helps us to measure success on our websites and let us know how successful our ads for example were. Then we finally wrapped it all up with a very well known feature of Google Tag Manager, which is the auto event tracking. This helps us to measure interactions. And I showed you an example on how to track a button click and forward on any event to Google Analytics and to your Facebook Ads. Now, pat yourself on the back for everything that you have learned so far, but your Google Tag Manager journey has just begun.

Moving on to our resources where you can continue your learning journey. Now, first of all, we need to talk about the Google Tag Manager Help section. This is the official Google Tag Manager library of different help articles. Google does actually a lot to help people out, understand Google Tag Manager better and give you best practices on how to deploy your tags. They have a whole writing team that takes care of these guides. So definitely, this would be my first station if I wanted to find out what is the official stance on a certain feature of Google Tag Manager from Google itself. This is really the closest that you will get to support from Google itself. Unless you are a subscriber to the Google Cloud platform where you get official support from Google. If you have questions as a normal user, you can ask them in the Help Forum. Now in the help forum, there are different Google Tag Manager experts and you most likely gonna get an answer to all your questions here and can also go through and look for questions that have been already asked. So Google does quite a lot to support users of this product. They also have developed a course, which is available at the analytics Academy. And he has different courses about Google Analytics, but also about Google Tag Manager. Now, my opinion it’s not the best introduction to Google Tag Manager itself, but it has some really great animations and has a high production value. So it’s great to go through and quite digestible so definitely check out to Google Tag Manager fundamentals course. Now, moving on to outside resources, where you can find out more about Google Tag Manager and we need to mention my friend Simo Ahava here who is the foremost expert on Google Tag Manager itself. He’s also a Google Developer expert and really understands the intricacies of Google Tag Manager very well, but also the technical background that all the analytics tools from Google provide. So every

I want to understand certain features in that I turned to his blog where he has written a lot of different blog posts on certain features and shows us all how to use them. So definite website that everybody needs to bookmark who’s serious about using Google Tag Manager. Second blog that I turned to often is the offering from the agency of Bounteous. They have some great people on their staff that come up with Google Tag Manager implementations all the time. And you can find some real gems inside of their blog library here. I’ve learned a lot through them. So definitely check out the different posts that they have on their site. Now, obviously there are tons of more blogs out there and I’ve written them down on our GTM resource guide that you can download at measureschool.com/guide. We have different blogs, people to follow book recommendation tools to try out discussion forums and so on. So definitely go over to measureschool.com/guide and check out these different resources. On measureschool itself, we run a newsletter every week. So if you sign up to our newsletter, you will get our newest videos with some measure news. So you stay up to date with everything that is happening. We also run a membership site called measure masters, where we have people who are very serious about measuring their data correctly. And this is where we provide them all our premium courses, live trainings, and also some tools and resources to make their work easier. So if you’re interested in that, check out measureschool.com/measuremasters. And if you want to follow up on this course and take the next step in your GTM journey. Then we have a follow-up course called Google Tag Manager for beginners plus Challenges. And this is a course that I run on Udemy and I have added some exercises and a demo website to this course. So you will be able to actually try out and challenge yourself to implement some features within Google Tag Manager. I think this is the perfect next step for everyone who enjoyed this course to learn about more features of Google Tag Manager and actually get into doing and trying out. So definitely check out our course on Udemy. It will be linked up in the description down below.

All right so there you have it, my favorite resources for diving deeper into Google Tag Manager. Now if you enjoyed this course then I can only wholeheartedly recommend to go through our GTM for beginners plus challenges where you can actually practice your knowledge. I’m going to link all the information up down below. And there’s tons of more stuff that is always coming out about Google Tag Manager, about measurement in general. So you should definitely subscribe to our channel right over there. So you stay up to date with everything that we do on this channel.

Now, my name is Julian. See you in the next one.

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How to Build a Scroll + Timer Trigger with Google Tag Manager

Here’s an easy way to make your scroll trigger are more accurate. We will utilize a custom JS variable to measure the time the user spent on your website. In this video, I will walk you through the steps on how to setup a Scroll Timer Trigger in GTM and make sure we count users who spent a certain Timer on page + Scroll down as converted.

đź”— Links:

How to install Scroll Depth Tracking with Google Tag Manager https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoOh58pvqG4

How to build your own Timer Trigger in GTM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoX-P9id4XM

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

đź‘Ť FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. And today I want to show you how you can make your scroll triggers more accurate by including the time that was actually spent on the website. So the case here being we have a website where we have a scroll trigger installed. I have this inside of my Google Tag Manager account. And if you want to figure out how you can install scroll trigger, then head back to a video. And I’m also going to link up down below.

Now I have this installed. And this fires when the user scrolls over 75% of the website. It will have this GTM scroll depth in the data layer. And we have our tag fired. Now, the action that I took just now is just scrolling down very quickly. If you want to get a more accurate reading on if the user has actually read the contents of this website. And he probably takes a little bit of time in order to read all through this. And then this scroll track event will fire. So how can we implement this and make this more accurate in order to take the time that you spend on this website also into account? To make this work, we will make use of a little variable that is in the data layer pushed automatically during the page view. So when the page first loads, if you look into the data layer, we have something here called GTM start. This is not something that is in the interface by default. But we can utilize this. What does this actually mean? Well, this shows us the time that is recorded by JavaScript since 1970, which shows the time right now in milliseconds. If we open up our developer tool and do a little test here. So I’m here the developer console, I can get the accurate time reading by just typing new date, and then get time and I get a similar number like we have here. And this is actually the actual time right now. And you see that there is a bit of a difference here. And this is the time difference that was actually the elapsed time when the page view event fires and now we get a new time reading. So we could compare these two numbers and get the elapsed time which is easily done within JavaScript and Google Tag Manager. Obviously, with a custom JavaScript variable. I have something prepared right here. And again, just looks at the new time that is right now and gets the time from the data layer when the page view event started. And then we do a little bit of math and get the elapsed time in seconds, and then put that back into our variable. So this variable gets filled every time an event fires. And we actually look at it with our trigger. So when we go back here, we can see when the message happened was actually zero seconds. DOM ready also zero seconds really fast. But then one second, till the window loaded. There’s obviously our window load of time. And then our scroll dept trigger was hundred 60 seconds before our 75% was reached. Let’s go back and try this out again. I’m going to reload. I’m going to scroll down.

And we have here scroll depth. And the variable now shows we took six seconds in order to scroll all the way down. Now obviously, this is a very short time for a user to be reading this whole landing page. And therefore we would like to maybe change this around and say, if the user hits 75%, we want to make sure that he at least spent 20 seconds on the website or 10 seconds on the website in order for the trigger to fire our tag and therefore count this user as converted. So all we would need to do is go into our scroll depth trigger. And with this new variable, we can go ahead and add a new condition here, which is our time since page load in seconds. And we want to make sure that the user hit at least 10 seconds. Let’s save this and refresh, go back to our page. Now, if I scroll down really fast, our scroll depth fires. But our tag doesn’t fire because the user only took two seconds. Let’s try this out again. I’m going to reload.

Now let’s take a little bit more time to read through this. And hopefully, it will take some 10 seconds to scroll down here now. We are now hitting the 75% mark I think. We took 16 seconds and we hitting the 75% mark. So now our tag should have fired but it didn’t fire. So let’s go into the tag itself why it didn’t fire and debug this really quickly. We see custom JS time since elapsed was 10, we had 16, yes, but I actually took the wrong condition it says contains it must be above. So let’s go back into our trigger and change this around simple mistakes. Right? Less than and greater than 10. So it needs to be above 10 in order for our tag to fire. Otherwise, you would need to hit the 10 seconds exactly. It wouldn’t make sense. So let’s try this out again. Reload, scroll down here.

Okay. And we hopefully hitting it before the 10 seconds. Yes, after the 10 seconds. Here is now our scroll event that took 12 seconds. So we took 12 seconds to read through this. And we have a 75% scroll depth and therefore our tag fire our conditions both turn true and our event scroll tag fired correctly. So with this little JavaScript variable, you can combine the time spent on the website plus your scroll depth trigger. I’m going to link up the code for this down below this custom JavaScript variable. And you also need to have something called the container ID enabled here in Google Tag Manager. This is a built-in variable so if you don’t have that enabled yet, go to configure. And then here is the container ID this needs to be enabled for it to work. So in conclusion, this is a really easy way to make your scroll that triggers more accurate.

Hey, there it’s me again. Thanks for checking out our quick tip video. Was that helpful? Did you understand something not quite, then I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. But if you liked it, then why not give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian for next time.

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Auto-Event Tracking with Google Tag Manager – Lesson 6 GTM for Beginners

In our previous lessons, you have learned how to utilize GTM to deploy tags on page loads. And today, we are going to discuss the power of GTM that detects actuals user interactions then fire our tags. In Google Tag Manager this is called Auto-Event tracking.

In this video, we will discover how it works by creating a trigger to fire a tag during a button click.

đź”— Links:

Take the Quiz: https://measureschool.com/lesson6

Introduction To Google Tag Manager 2019 | Lesson 1 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPEdkc_feNM&feature=youtu.be

How to Install Google Tag Manager (2019) | Lesson 2 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ty8Z8fjgvQ

Analytics Audit and Tag Planning | Lesson 3 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZkhtCg8OYc

Google Analytics Tracking Migration with GTM | Lesson 4 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVNd2MnT9QU

Conversion Tracking Installation with GTM Lesson 5 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBGEEoeRNFQ

MORE AUTO-EVENT TRIGGER VIDEOS:

Form Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZA-5Nav0Bo

YouTube Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_sbCHBVjzA

Scroll Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcQdCl-B3lw

Element Visibility Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faBNebOHxsU

Link Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc1Ydy612_Q

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

đź“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

đź“· Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

đź‘Ť FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this lesson, we’re going to talk about how you can deploy tags upon interactions such as button clicks with the help of Google Tag Manager. All and more, coming up.

Hello there. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. And in our last lessons, we have learned how we can utilize Google Tag Manager to deploy tags on the page load such as all the pages that we have on a page or just a specific page. But one thing that we haven’t talked about yet which is really a power of Google Tag Manager is the auto-event tracking feature. This feature let us pick up any interactions such as button clicks or form submit, or scrolls or YouTube plays on our website and then fire our tags. So we will not be just restricting ourselves to certain pages where we want to deploy our tags.

But actual interactions that the user takes on our website. How exciting. Speaking of exciting, there is a quiz that I prepared for you at measureschool.com/lesson6 where you can test your knowledge after this video. So pay close attention, we got lots to cover let’s dive in.

In the last lessons, we have fire our tags on two particular triggers. This is the all pages trigger which is deploying these tags on all the pages. We have Google Tag Manager installed and we have created a specific trigger, which is our purchase trigger. And what happens within Google Tag Manager is that every time the page reloads. So if you go to a new page here, our trigger gets evaluated and Google Tag Manager decides whether to fire our tag or wait for the next time a page loads to evaluate your trigger again. So for example, here on this page view, we have our Facebook page with all pages trigger.

And if I click on it and scroll down, we can see here our all pages trigger evaluated to true. This is the little check mark here and our tag fired and deployed our tag. As opposed to this Facebook ads event on the purchase event. This didn’t fire because we specified a filter rule right here which states that the page URL needs to contain checkout order received, which is obviously not the case. Now, all of these triggers are the rules that determine whether your tags would fire or not. And they get evaluated on certain events. And these events are like checkpoints that you see here on the left side. Every time we reload the page three events get sent by default, which is the page view, the DOM ready, and the window loaded. And right now we are evaluating on the page view event. This means at this event at this point in time, our trigger gets evaluated and checked for certain conditions. Now, what we want to do in this lesson is actually trigger a tag upon a button click, for example, this. But when this button click happens, we don’t actually have anything inside where we can check upon this event whether our condition turn true. So we need to somehow let Google Tag Manager know that there is a click that happened. And this is what we’re going to use auto-event triggers for. Let’s take a look at how they work. So when we deploy Google Tag Manager and our trigger, then our trigger determines whether we should fire our tag and deploy the code that sends information for example, to a tool like Google Analytics. With the auto-event trigger, we actually deploy two functionalities. One is the listener functionality to pick up the interaction and then the filter functionality to determine whether we should turn our trigger true and fire our tag and deploy the code. So how does that work? If you have a page where you have Google Tag Manager installed, then we can already determine when the user changes the page.

There’s more going on on a page for example clicks. Now if you want to pick up these clicks and forward them on to our tool like Google Analytics, we need to deploy our auto event tracking, which means we install a listener functionality through the trigger and listen to all the clicks that are happening on the website. And these get forwarded on to the filter which then determines Okay, only this click something we want to evaluate. And if it’s true, we want to find our tag like a Google Analytics event tag. So let’s install this with Google Tag Manager. So back at our demo shop, we have here a button that we want to track. The click on the Add to Cart button is the interaction that we want to pick up with Google Tag Manager. The first thing that we need to do is to deploy our listener functionality through our trigger. So let’s go up to Google Tag Manager here and click on triggers and build a new click trigger. Just going to call this click and as configuration, we can choose our trigger type here. And we have many different interactions that we can choose from. But we are interested in particular in the click interaction and we’re going to choose all elements. Now if you adjust a link you could also choose this but. Since we are trying to track a button here we go with all elements and in order to see how its functions we will not put our filter conditions in here just yet. We’ll just go ahead and go with all clicks and save this for now. Let’s refresh and go back to our page. Let’s refresh that.

And now you will see every time you click on the page you will see a new event happening in our preview and debug mode. Here’s a GTM, here’s a GTM click, there’s a GTM click, there’s a GTM click with many GTM clicks now in our preview and debug mode. Now what we would need to do is evaluate our filter condition upon this GTM click, and this is where variables coming. Now variables are little placeholders that get filled every time a new event happens here. We have the page path the page URL the page hostname, but these don’t really change. Since we are still on the same URL, we are still on the same path and the hostname. We would need to have some kind of variable that actually reacts on click, and they are some built-in ones that we can activate. Let’s go over to Google Tag Manager and here under variables we have our built in variables and we can configure new ones. And here are different variables that we can activate and specific ones for our click trigger. So I’m just going to go ahead and activate all of these click triggers and one cell activated, you can hit refresh here, go back to our page, reload page.

Let’s go to a product page and again if I click anywhere we see that GTM click happens. We can click on this title here we could

Click on the Add to Cart button. Now earlier, we noticed that when we click the Add to Cart button the page reloads. And this is something we don’t want to happen, since we want to look at these GTM clicks. So I’m going to click on this with the Command key press or the control key pressed on Windows, and this will open this in a new tab. Sometimes this method doesn’t work. You could also press the Escape key or use an extension in order to stop the browser from redirecting you on. Now as you can see here now, we have different GTM clicks and we can look at the variables to see how our click variables get filled. So here we have to click classes. Apparently, I clicked on a bad come. Here I clicked on the side header and the text of this header was right here.

We can also see here a click text sometimes because when I clicked on the headline and sometimes an ID or other information is present. What we need to do right now is to figure out how our desire click, in this case, it was the ninth click here, differs from all the other clicks that are happening on the website itself. And we do this by looking at the variables itself and figure out what is really unique about my ninth click. So in my case, I can look at the click text and it says Add To Cart. If I go to the other click see this changes all the time. So the attribute that is very unique about this button is the click text. So we can use this attribute to filter down on our interactions on our clicks that are happening on the page. This is the time now where we can go into our trigger that we have prepared and turn it into a specific one that only fires on Add To Cart clicks. So let’s go back into the configuration and then this time we want to trigger and fire our tags upon only some clicks where the click text equals Add To Cart. Let’s save this.

And in order to see what’s happening, we actually need to attach the trigger to a tag. So I’m going to go over to tags here and build a new Google Analytics event tag. We’re gonna click tag configurations and choose my Google Universal Analytics tag template.

And this time, we want to not fire a page view but rather any event into Google Analytics. So we can pick that up later on. Now, event tracking has certain parameters, the category action and label you could also fill the value but it’s not really necessary. And this is just a classification on how you want to see the data later on in Google Analytics. So for me, I’m going to go with a category called click and the action add to cart and then the label I’m actually interested on which page this happens. So I’m going to go ahead and fill this out dynamically with my page path. So this will be automatically replaced when the user clicks on the Add to Cart button with the URL that he’s currently on. Then I’m going to choose my Google Analytics settings variable which we had set up previously. And attach my trigger that we have just set up. So let’s add this and save.

Let’s refresh our preview and debug mode. Go back to our page. Reload that and let’s try this out again. I’m going to click on the title. Let’s see if something happens. Nothing happens on this event. Let’s click on this box here. Nothing happens either. But now I’m going to click on Add to Cart button with the Command key pressed and we should see on our seventh click we have a tag that fired. This is our Google Analytics event Add To Cart click. Again a little bit of a Q&A here we have Google Analytics firing. And if you click on it, you see events that fired. This is our click Add to cart and label and so on. Now, if you wanted to see this information, later on, you can go into your Google Analytics. Here we go.

And we can go into the real-time reporting under events to see what events have entered the account. And here we see our event category, click and add to cart. We also would see if you click through that this happened on the event label product happy Ninja, which is the page path that I’m on right now. Now, the real-time reporting is not really looking at long term data. If you wanted to analyze this, later on, you can go under the behavior report. And here under events, you would see all the events that fired into your account and analyze them. Now there are none in here right now because it usually takes a little while to enter all the data into these reports. But this is where you would find your event data. So now we have successfully built our first auto-event trigger. Let’s also for completion sake put us into our Events tab here in our tag plan.

We have already something prepared here button click, Add to Cart. And this fires an event Google Analytics and let’s put in a tick box here. This is also active. Now that we have already created the trigger. We can obviously reuse this. For example, let’s fire any event to Facebook advertising so we can do remarketing and build a custom audience. All we would need to do is in Google Tag Manager go over to our tags and create a new tag. This would be to Facebook ads it’s going to be a custom event that is upon Add To Cart click.

As the configurations which was again custom HTML. What is the custom HTML that we would use? Let’s go over to our facebook pixel and look at the configurations. Set up a new event here we go and we can go with eCommerce and retail. They have certain events here. The add to cart event is what we want to send on so this would be the code that we would need.

Going to copy this go over to Google Tag Manager and enter our code right here. So this is the Facebook track event. You know that we have already sent our library so the big code in another tag so that’s something we’re not going to set up again and now we’re gonna just use our already configured click Add to Cart trigger to fire our Facebook ads event. Let’s refresh, go back to our page add to cart with the Command key pressed. We see now there’s another facebook pixel helper that we have our Add To Cart event that we just fired. And in the facebook pixel helper, you should also see our test events here. Well, let’s do this again since we haven’t had it open.

Now we see our Add To Cart event just fired with our desire code. And the page URL is also sent over. So this is how you can set up your auto-event trigger with the help of Google Tag Manager and send an event to Google Analytics, Facebook Ads or even Google Ads. Don’t forget at the end if you want to take this live to all your users, you will need to submit a version and deploy this on your website.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can track button clicks with the help of Google Tag Manager. Obviously, there are other interactions like form submit, scrolls, or the element visibility trigger, a very cool trigger that you should check out. I have some videos linked up down below from our channel we explained those in detail. Now even more exciting thing is did you understand everything? Well, check your knowledge at measurechool.com/lesson6. We have a little bit of a quiz prepared for you so you can see if you understood everything. And I hope to see you in the next lesson which we’re gonna have linked up up here if it’s already there. And if you haven’t yet, then also consider subscribing right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian. Till next time.

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Conversion Tracking Installation with GTM Lesson 5 (GTM for Beginners)

After installing GTM correctly and migrated our existing tracking with the help of our tag plan, it is now time to track our conversions.

In this 5th lesson of our GTM for beginners series, let’s learn how we can measure the success of our site by installing conversion tracking. This is a step by step guide on the proper installation and configuration of the Facebook Conversion Pixel and Google Ads pixel.

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Take the Quiz: https://measureschool.com/lesson5

Introduction To Google Tag Manager 2019 | Lesson 1 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPEdkc_feNM&feature=youtu.be

How to Install Google Tag Manager (2019) | Lesson 2 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ty8Z8fjgvQ

Analytics Audit and Tag Planning | Lesson 3 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZkhtCg8OYc

Google Analytics Tracking Migration with GTM | Lesson 4 (GTM for Beginners) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVNd2MnT9QU

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In this fifth lesson of our GTM for beginner series, we’re going to find out how we can install conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager. All and more, coming up.

Hello there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and we are on our fifth lesson of our GTM for beginner series. Now in the last lessons, we have already installed Google Tag Manager, plan out our migration and then migrated all our existing tracking over to Google Tag Manager. So we now have data flowing into our account. And this is already great data because we know where the user is coming from and what he’s doing on our website. The crucial part that is actually still missing is did the user take the action that we want him to take and this is commonly referred to as conversion tracking. This is very important data that we need to forward on to our paid traffic sources, for example, Google Ads or Facebook Ads because we want these tools to know if the user, the user that they sent us actually converted. And that way we can find out how effective were our ads so did the traffic that these platforms actually sent us turned into paying customers, for example. Now, in order to do conversion tracking, you actually need to install a tracking code on a specific website, or when the user actually does the conversion action. And with Google Tag Manager, we can do this pretty easily. But before we learn all about this, if you want to test your knowledge right after this video, then head over to measureschool.com/lesson5 we have a little bit of a quiz prepared for you. So pay close attention because we got lots to cover so let’s dive in.

In this, as we want to install conversion tracking on this demo shop. But first of all, what our conversions? They are simply how we define success on our website. What is the interaction we want our users to take? So in order to install conversion tracking, we need to pick one interaction that we would define as conversion. For an e-commerce shop, this is pretty easy because we want the user to actually buy products. So let’s see what a conversion would look like. Let’s conduct a test conversion. I’m going to put something into my cart and simply go through the checkout process.

And once I place the order, I have taken the action that we want our users to take. And I get to this page, the auto received page or the thank you page, which only people can get to that actually went through the checkout and purchase the product. So this is the action that we want our users to take. How would we measure this? The interaction that we can easily measure is a page load or a page view. And the page view can take as a measurement is if the user has actually reached this thank you page.

This is interaction we can pick up with Google Tag Manager and then send it on to our tools. Conversion Tracking works differently in different tools. So for example, for Facebook, we need to install a certain pixel. For Google ads, we would need to define a conversion here under our conversion report. And in Google Analytics, it’s actually a little bit more diverse. You can configure a destination goal, an event code or e-commerce tracking, which is specialized for eCommerce shops. But this is a bit more complicated and we have some tutorials on this channel if you want to set us up for your store. We won’t be doing this in this lesson. Let’s concentrate on Facebook and Google Ads for now. So for Facebook Ads, we can go up to the pixel setup here and we have done this in our previous lesson. I’m going to install a facebook pixel manually which will give us some HTML code we have installed this last time. Then on the next section here we can actually install and track events.

And these are specialized interactions that we can send over. One of these interactions is the purchase event. And if you read closely through the documentation here you will get all the information that we need in order to send this over. I’m not going to send over any kind of event parameters for now just to keep it simple. And we’re just going to send over the signal that a purchase has happened on our store. What we will need to do is deploy this kind of code on our page. Before we get started let’s document this in our tag plan here so we’re going to deploy a Facebook conversion pixel.

Description is purchase event and as the notes, I’m going to put in the page that we actually are deploying this on which is the page right here.And then we can also put in a new tick box once we activate this. With that information present, let’s go ahead and install this in Google Tag Manager. Now in Google Tag Manager itself, if we look at our already deployed tags, we see that they all are firing on the all pages trigger, which is a built-in trigger that deploys our tracking codes on every page where Google Tag Manager is installed. Now obviously you don’t want to deploy this conversion action on every page. We want to deploy it only on this order receipt page because then the user has taken the action that we wanted him to take. So let’s first work on our trigger and we’re going to build a special trigger for this that only fires on our thank you page. Let’s go over to triggers and then new and under the trigger configuration, we can choose when our trigger or rule should be evaluated. So every time the page view happens, every time a click happens, and many other events that we are good to in later lessons. For now, we already said that when the user lands on the page when the page actually loads, we want to evaluate whether the users actually on the thank you page. And that’s why we’re going to choose the page view trigger type. And this will determine when the trigger is actually evaluated. So here’s the page view event. But we want to not deploy this on all page views but only on some. And this will give us the chance to further restrict or define our trigger to only fire on certain circumstances. So underneath here, we have some rules that we can define. First of all, we will need to choose a variable and right here we have the page hostname, page path, page URL, referral present in order for us to evaluate against. You don’t need to understand everything about them. But right now the page URL is when we want to determine if the user is actually on this page. So we can build a rule that if the page URL contains and there are other matching options, some go more detail, and you can get more specialized with it. But contains will do for now. If the URL contains, let’s look at the URL, checkout/order received, for example, if that’s the case, then I want to deploy my tag.

Now, why didn’t I use, for example, the equals option or another option right here or copy this whole URL? Well, there are some dynamic values in this URL. So for example, this changes every time we have a new order, this is the order number that actually comes up. So we would need to possibly go through more test conversions in order to find this out. But check out received or order received is a pretty unique part of the URL. And the user would actually not be able to get here through a random link on the website. He would need to go to the checkout and convert in order for him to get to this order, receive page. So it’s pretty unique and this is what we going to use for our trigger. Let’s give this all a name this fires on the page view event. And once we get to our purchase section. Let’s save this.

And we have now defined our trigger when we want to deploy our tag. Now we get to the actual tracking code that we want to deploy. And we go over to the text on the facebook pixel. We have seen this little tracking code right here. It actually works in combination with the tracking code that we have deployed last time. So right here we have our Facebook tracking code. And only if this upper part is deployed, we will be able to deploy our code right here. Since we always do this on all the pages is the old pages trigger, we can say that we wouldn’t need to repeat ourselves in the next tag. But what we want to make sure is that this fires actually before our tag fires. There are different methods of doing this and an easy way is to use a tag priority option which would give priority to this tag, the higher the number is. So if you put in 100 here, for example, then this tag would fire earlier than all the other tags that have a lower priority. So I’m going to implement this for our tag and update this. Let’s save this. And now build our new tag, which doesn’t have a tag template available. So there is no tag template right here. But we can utilize custom HTML tag where we can enter our little code that we have copied here.

Whoops. So here we go. We don’t have to put a tag priority this time into this field as it’s when it’s empty, lower than the other tag priorities that have a number in them. So this will fire after our initial Facebook ads code and we can now attach simply a trigger which is our page view purchase trigger. Now let’s give this all a name and save this. And now we can try it out by going into the preview mode. And once we are in it, we can go back to our page, reload that, and right now we are on the thank you page. So it’s expected for our code to fire.

So here we have our debug console and we see our Facebook Ads event, the purchase event fired just fine on this thank you page. Obviously, you should do multiple checks. Let’s do a little bit of Q&A and go into our facebook pixel helper. We see our purchase event fired right here. And in Facebook itself, it’s always important that your data is actually received. So when we go back to our facebook pixel right here, we can actually go to test events and this will put Facebook into this listening mode. And if we go back to our page and just reload this, our Facebook ads purchase event will fire again. And we see here that we now have a new purchase code that was sent over just now. So this seems to work just fine and our conversions are now tracked and properly installed with the Facebook Ads. The heavy lifting , in this case,is simply to build the right trigger in order to fire this on the thank you page. And since we have done this now and we have this trigger available, we can actually reuse it. That’s a big advantage of Google Tag Manager to stay flexible and deploy also our Google Ads conversion tracking. And we have another video on this but it basically works the same, you have a purchase pixel once we have configured everything you’ll be able to get the configuration data right here and be able to implement it into your Google Tag Manager account. I’m just gonna for completion sake also make this available in our tag plan with this configuration, and let’s also put this on to a new checkbox. And now we going to use this data to simply build our new tag. This time, Google obviously has a template available. Here’s a Google Ads conversion tracking template where we simply need to put our conversion ID in. That’s something we have saved here and our conversion label. The other fields we can live on touch for now. And we simply reuse our trigger that we have built before for our purchase tracking. Let’s gives this all a name.

And try this out by refreshing our preview and debug mode, and refreshing our page. And again, we can now see that our Google Ads conversion purchase pixel has also fired on this thank you page. Obviously, we should also look into our other tools. We have the tag assistant here that shows us that Google Ads tracking works. And you should also be able to see incoming data in your Google Ads account,. Although you wouldn’t need to go through an actual Google ad in order for it to show up in the conversions right here.

So I won’t to this for now but it shows the case that we can really utilize our firing trigger over and over again, if we had a new tool that we want to connect to this conversion. Now, as always, if you have tested this thoroughly, our conversion tags are firing correctly on this page. If you go to another page they actually, hopefully not firing. Yes, that’s the case. So these are not firing because the conditions of our trigger, which we can see by choosing event, and clicking on them right here, we see that our page URL does not contain other received. And therefore this whole trigger failed. And our tag is not deployed which we want. Only if you go through the checkout and get to the order receipt page, our conversion tracking fires correctly. So once you’re sure and done your Q&A, we are ready to deploy our tracking. Let’s click on the submit button and give this all a name.

And then we are ready to publish a new version to all our users. And it’s now deployed on our website. So this is how you can deploy conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can do conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager and forward this on to your paid traffic sources, but also Google Analytics if you wanted to. We have more tutorials on this channel where you can find out how to send different conversion data to different tools, but also how to install conversion tracking if your case is not an online shop, like we have it right here. But as always, if you want to test your knowledge right after this video, then head over to measureschool.com/lesson5 where we have a little bit of a quiz prepared for you to see if you understood everything or if you have any knowledge gaps and need to recap or go back in this video to understand it. And if you want to follow along with the next lesson, then be sure to subscribe to our channel right over there. Because we’re bringing new videos just like this one. We have maybe the next tutorial already linked up up there so you know where to go afterwards. Now as always, my name is Julian. Till next time

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