How to use Dynamic Facebook URL Parameters to Tag Your Campaigns

When setting up UTM Parameters for Facebook Ads you previously had to go through some elaborate steps to build your correct Parameters into your Campaigns. Wit the new dynamic Ad Parameters feature you can quickly input Ad Parameters into your campaigns and keep them consistent. In this video we are going to take a look at this new feature.

Links mentioned in the video:
Facebook URL Parameters: https://www.facebook.com/business/help/1016122818401732
[VIDEO] URL Query Strings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_o7iilNdLQ
[VIDEO] UTM Tags explained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNOsldDS_pY

More from Measureschool

Correct Google Analytics Setup Course: https://measureschool.com/products/google-analytics-course/
GTM Resource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide
GTM Beginner course: Course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
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So Facebook ads has recently announced a new feature where you can take dynamic URL parameters and implement them into your Facebook Ads. What that means for you, and why you should be using them all the more, coming up right after this.

Hey there, and welcome back to another video of Measureschool.com, teaching you the data driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and today we wanna talk about this new feature of dynamic URL parameters within Facebook Ads.

Now if you’re not familiar with URL parameters as a whole yet, I would urge you to check out our video on query strings right here that will explain a little bit more why you should be using them, and how a tracking system like Google Analytics actually uses them. And from that you will then understand why it’s so important that you tag your URLs correctly with UTM tags so Google Analytics actually can identify where your traffic is coming from, and will put them into the right category within your Google Analytics. Now if you’re already doing this with Facebook Ads, hats off. This is really a good practice to implement in any kind of campaign.

But Facebook has made our life so much easier now because they have brought a new feature into the whole Facebook Ads suite, which are dynamic URL parameters. And these are really helpful to tag our campaigns fast. Now, how you can use them, and why it’s such a time saver, let’s explore this a little bit in our screencast.

All right, so here we are in our Ads Manager account of Facebook Ads. And I have an old campaign here that I’ve ran before. And I’ve also used UTM tags to properly tag my ads. So if you go to Edit here, and scroll down, probably know that there is a field called URL Parameters, and there’s where I’ve entered some UTM tags so I’d be able to identify my campaign later in Google Analytics as well. Now in order to tag my ads efficiently, I’ve actually used our UTM tagging tool, where I usually would put in the landing page, and then define the medium, the source, and implement the campaign name, the campaign content, and campaign term. Now normally I would go through and actually say, okay, what’s the campaign name here, and I would copy that, put that into that field. And then campaign content would be my ad set, right here. And my actual ad name would also be inputted here into the sheet, so later when I choose my campaign source and landing page, I’ll get a UTM tagged URL that I could then input into my parameter field right here. So then it would be tagged up correctly and I would be able to identify it later in Google Analytics.Now this was a really cumbersome process if you were going through multiple campaigns, multiple ad set, multiple ads, and had to change this around every time you have a new ad.

Luckily, Facebook has a new feature called, the dynamic parameters for your URLs, and these look as follows: you can simply now, take these two curly brackets, and input site source name, placement, ad ID, ad set ID, campaign name ID, ad name, and so on, instead of the actual name, and Facebook ads will automatically replace this in your URL parameters. So these are basically placeholders that you can use freely. And in our case, I would just go ahead and say, okay, I will keep the cpc, and the Facebook the same, but I wanna change the campaign name. That should be automatically inputted, which is right here, the campaign name. Then we would like to add our ad set name, as campaign content. And we would like to have the ad name as the campaign term. That will give us our URL string with these curly brackets in here. So let’s copy that. And replace this right here. We don’t need the beginning of the URL for this URL parameter field. And now those should be automatically replaced in our ad.

So once I’ve confirmed this, I’ll be able to try this actually out by going to this button here, and viewing this on my desktop newsfeed. And right here we see the ad, and if I click on Learn More, I should go to the page, the landing page, and automatically this was replaced with our campaign name, right here, UTM content, and UTM image. And this should then also be visible in our Google Analytics. So, if you go here to the realtime reporting, look at traffic sources, we just see that somebody came through cpc Facebook, and we have here our guy from image YellowJulian, which is the actual ad name. So, this was transferred into Google Analytics just fine.

Now, this makes my life much easier because now I can just copy this string and input it into all the different ads that I have on Facebook, and don’t have to worry about adjusting this URL parameter anymore. So if you are using Facebook ads a lot, this will help you out to keep your ads tagging much more consistent, have cleaner data in Google Analytics. Hopefully will have you implement UTM tags with every ad on Facebook.

All right, so there you have it. This is the new feature of Facebook ads, where you can take these two curly brackets with your parameter name and implement them dynamically into your URL parameter template. Now, this is really great addition because we now can basically take this one string that I showed you, and input that in any kind of ad set and it will dynamically replace this with your ad set name or your campaign name, for example, and keep our Google Analytics cleaner and more consistent in terms of the URL tagging structure that we have now in place.

So, I hope this video helps you out in terms of tagging your campaigns correctly. If you like this video, then please, give us a thumbs up, and also subscribe to our channel right over there, because I’ll bring you new videos, just like this one, every week. Now, my name is Julian. ‘Til next time.

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Free ActiveCampaign Contact scoring with AppsScript

Free ActiveCampaign Contact scoring with AppsScript

Do you want to find out more about your users and improve sales?

Then having a scoring feature like Active Campaign’s built-in one might be interesting to you. Unfortunately, it’s only available on the Plus Plan, so we created a free alternative that runs via Apps Script.

The feature allows you to give points to users for taking certain actions – e.g. opening an email, clicking a link or visiting a specific site on your website.

This can be a great help when it comes to identifying and targeting leads, taking assumptions about your target market and sales process, tracking engagement of your customers to not waste time on dead end leads and a lot more.

In this video, you’re going to learn how to implement scoring in your ActiveCampaign Account – without having to upgrade your plan.

#ActiveCampaign
#ContactScoring
#EmailMarketing

? Links mentioned in the video:
ActiveCampaign: http://www.activecampaign.com/?_r=K93ZWF56
Lead Scoring Script: https://techmarketer.io/ActiveCampaignScoring
Drip’s Lead Scoring Guide: https://www.drip.co/blog/best-practices/what-is-lead-scoring/
ActiveCampaign: http://www.activecampaign.com/

? Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

? Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

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? FOLLOW US
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
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– [Julian] Hi there and welcome back to another video of TechMarketer.io. My name is Julian and today I want to show you my solution for scoring within ActiveCampaign. Now ActiveCampaign has a scoring feature built-in that you can activate by updating your account, and it will let you give certain points to your users once they take certain action in your account, for example, open up an email, click a link, or visit a specific site on your website. And this is really useful if you want to find out what users are most valuable within your system of ActiveCampaign. Now this is already built-in. That way you can segment your users and send them out certain emails or put them in certain automations. This is all possible already with ActiveCampaign. Unfortunately, you need to be part of at least the Plus plan in order to do this, which starts at $49 a month. I would say it’s worth it, if you have a small account that actually makes use of this feature heavily. Now for everybody else out there who is more in the email marketing space and doesn’t use the CRM features of ActiveCampaign, you might want to take a look at my solution here that I’ve implemented for my email list running on ActiveCampaign as well. Now we have many more contacts that I also want to score but it gets really pricey on the Plus plan once you hit certain subscriber counts. Now my solution is completely free. It works with a little bit of app script but other than that you can do most of the functionality that you see within the scoring feature of ActiveCampaign through this app script. So let me show you how to set this up. First of all, you need to have a copy of this app script. Go over to TechMarketer.io/ActiveCampaignScoring, and you can obtain a copy there. Obviously you would need to have an active Google account so you can connect this to your Google Drive, and then you can open this up in your Google Drive, and we need to do some configurations. So first of all we would need to change our URL, this is our API URL, so let’s go over to our demo account here, and under the Settings we just go into the Developer section here, and here we get our API URL. So we just replace that here. And then we need our API key, which we also can copy from here, and we place that right here. That should do it. Let’s save this and go ahead and publish this. So we’ll go ahead and go to Deploy as web app. And the only configuration here is that we need to choose anyone even anonymous users. Then you can deploy it and it will give you back, first of all, a few permissions that you need to accept. So this will actually connect to an external service, which is the ActiveCampaign API. And then it will give you back your web app URL. Now this URL is actually kind of like a webhook that you can use to send data from ActiveCampaign to the script, and then the script will actually send it back to ActiveCampaign and update your contact. So next steps are simple. Let’s first of all make sure that we have a custom field installed. For that we will go over to our list. And we’ll go to Manage Fields, and then simply build a new or create a new field. This can be a hidden field. Alright, and the name should be score. Pretty easy. Let’s add this. Now this should be added to all our contacts. If you go to our contacts here, you see we have a new field called score, and that’s all we need. Now we can already start doing our scoring. Now how does that work? We are pretty flexible when we use automations. So let’s go over to our automations here and just build a new automation from scratch, and we can use any kind of trigger function that we want to, for example, event is great. We did another videos on how to capture them within ActiveCampaign. But an easy one would be open or reads an email so let’s click on that. When a contact opens any campaign, is okay, let’s add this as a start, and then we want to update his score. What do we do? Well, we make use simply of the webhook functionality right here. So let’s post the contact data to our URL that we have from our ActiveCampaign, and then we will attach a query string, and this is simply the character of a question mark and then our key which is score, and then equals, and here we need to enter by how many we want to count this action up by. So an email open is a pretty soft sign, I would say we would just say we want to count this up by one. By the way, you could also score behavior that is negative, so you could also say I want to actually deduct one, you just put a minus in front of that. But we will just keep as one, and let’s save this. Now once the user opens the email he goes into our automation and then we want to end this automation so he doesn’t get stuck in it. So let’s do that, give this all a name, and activate this automation. Alright, that’s all that is there’s to it. From now on all the users who open an email, any email, will go through this flow and their score will be added up by one. Now let’s try this out. We can actually go into one of our contacts here and trigger this automation manually by just adding this automation right here, pressing OK. Now we don’t have a score right now. Let’s reload our contact, and we see number one is now added. We can actually do this again and again, so let’s just for simplicity. The user goes through the flow again and it’s counted up again. Now we can at any point change the actual score if we choose to make this maybe, or decrease by one, if an email open should decrease this number. So I’ll just put a minus on here. Let’s save this, try this out again. Add. And reload. And we see now the score was decreased by one. We can also simply change any kind of number, so let’s say we want to add 100 to this, so I’ll just put 100 here and save this. Send a user through it again. Reload. And we now see 101 right here. So this works as expected. Now we can go ahead and build different automations. Not only about open an email but you have different other triggers to your disposal. As you know, you can increase this number upon a form submit, when user clicks an email link, or an event is recorded. I would actually recommend to check out this link by the team of Drip, which is a competitor of ActiveCampaign but they give you a very nice overview here on what lead scoring is but also how you should use it in terms of what actions you should be tagging. So for example, here an email opens is one point and email click would be three points, pricing, consultation page. But also if a user goes to a career page, you could give him minus 10 points because he indicated that he is probably not gonna buy your product buy rather wants to work with you. So check that out. I will link in the description below as well. So I hope this functionality is useful to you and don’t forget you can download the app script and copy it to your account so you can go through the steps and build your own scoring for free into ActiveCampaign at TechMarketer.io/ActiveCampaignScoring. And if you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below. Don’t forget to give us a thumbs-up, if you like this video, and if you want to see more, don’t forget to subscribe because we bring you new videos every week. My name is Julian. Till next time!

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An API Tutorial for Marketers – Using the Postman App

API Tutorial for Marketers with Postman App

APIs often get used by developers to pull data into their website, app, display it or manipulate it – but did you know that we, as marketers, can use this data as well? If we only find a way to get to it…

In this video, we’re going to show you how you can use API data with the Postman App – without having to learn a new language, getting used to a complicated UI or a new workflow…

#PostmanApp
#API
#MarketingTech

? Links mentioned in the video:
Postman App: https://www.getpostman.com/
Mailchimp: https://mailchimp.com/
Mailchimp API Docs: http://developer.mailchimp.com/documentation/mailchimp/reference/overview/
Mini Course: https://techmarketer.io/postman

? Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

? Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

? Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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– In this video, I’m gonna show you how you can pull data from an API with the help of Postman app. All the more coming up right after this. Hi there, and welcome to another video of measureshool.com where we teach you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and on this channel, we do marketing tech reviews, tutorials, and give you tips on how to become a more technical marketer, just like this one. So, if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing. Now data is everywhere, but how do you get to it? Well, most of the times, you will go through an API. Now, APIs have been used by developers quite often to pull data into the app or the website, display it, manipulate it, or change it around in the third party system. But, we as marketers can actually also use that data, if you just know how to get to it. Now, before you start building an app, try to retrieve that data and mesh it around and maybe send it back into your analytics system, why not try to get the request right first? And this is where Postman app comes in. Now, with Postman app, you can actually test APIs, and without coding, can send in a request with the right parameters and see what data you get back. Highly useful for us marketers because we can then instruct our developer to pull the right data or help us to build an app to actually take that data and send it onto a marketing script or a marketing tool like Google analytics. So, today I want to show you how you can use Postman app to retrieve data from an API, send your first request, and also manipulate data in a third party system. Now, we got lots to cover, so let’s dive in. Alright, today our journey starts at getpostman.com where you can download the Postman app, previously it was also available just to download it as a Chrome app, but that’s been depreciated, but here you can download it for your Mac, your Windows, or Linux machine. And once you install it, it should look something like this. Now, the tool in its basis is a free tool, which we can use as marketers just to see APIs, but if you want to take advantage of more of the advanced features, there’s also a pro version and enterprise version. Now, this tool is most often used to develop and test APIs. I actually use it most often before I start our building, for example, my favorite app scripts here, or a function within JavaScript. I want to actually know what data do I need to send into an API to get the right response. And Postman lets me do all of this without having to code too much and get caught up in any kind of syntax that I might do wrong within Fscript or JavaScript or PHP Rugan rails or any other language you use to grab information from APIs. Now, you might have seen something similar. It is actually like the Query Explorer for the Google Analytics Core Reporting API. You login here, then you can try out the API, mix and match certain metrics for example, and pull that data directly from the API, get the output right here. Now, if you actually wanted to integrate this into your app and have the right parameters that you send into the API to get a response, you would probably test this with something like Postman beforehand. So let’s get started with our first request. Here is an API that gives me some Chuck Norris quotes, and it specifies that I just simply simply need to send a get response to this endpoint, this URL to get my random quote. So, let’s try this out, let’s copy this URL, go over to Postman, and put in our URL right here, and then we have our different methods of sending that data. We want to go with the get response. Now, we can send this off, and we get a response, and this is actually a Jason response, so this is JavaScript object notation, and this is the structured way that we can get the data back, and we see here the value of this object is actually our quote that we wanted to get. So, pretty easy. In this sense, Postman is almost like a browser. You put in your URL, send it off and get a response. Now, if you do any kind of mistake, so let’s add something to the end here and send it, we see that the status is a 500 internal error. We get a message from the API back. That’s not always the case, but it helps us debug and maybe find something that we did wrong. Now, this is a very, very easy API, but we can just send in our URL and get a response back. In most cases, it’s it a bit advanced that that. Let’s go to another example, so here we have the weather API, the OpenWeatherMap, and we can actually get a current weather status for a city. Now, what do we have to do? We have to send in as a query string here in our URL the actual location. So, let’s try this out. Let’s take our API call here and put it into place. Now we have a query string, this is key of Q and the value of the city name, in our case Berlin. By the way, if you don’t want to type that out in the URL itself, you could also at any time click this Params here at the end, and type in the right key. and the value will be added automatically to your request. Then we can send this off and we get a negative response here of 401, saying that this is an invalid API key. Apparently, we need an API key to get the data from this API, and this is actually something that is required quite often with not as open APIs as the Chuck Norris API. So, we actually need to sign up to get our API key right here, so let’s copy that, and we actually need to send it in somehow, so let’s see how to do that. We can look up this in our documentation here, and we just need to attach another query parameter, which is the app ID with our API key, so let’s do that. Let’s go back and put in app ID, and then here our API key. Send this all off, and this time we get a response that right now in Berlin, there are clouds and description, broken clouds. So, quite interesting to see the response data and what data we can actually get out and maybe test that and send it onto a tracking script that sends the data over to Google analytics, so we would have the data in there, what weather it was at the location of our user, who just visited our website or bought our product. So far, so good, but we can not only get data from API, but also affect a change in the application itself, and this is done through other requests such as the post request, so let’s take a look at an example of that. Here we are in our MailChimp account, and MailChimp also has an API, so if we scroll down, we can see can see here the API docs. I actually need to log in first into my demo account here, and we can look into the API references and see what we would need to make this actually happen. First of all, this would be our URL, so I’m gonna copy that over. We actually need to make sure that we have our data center changed here, in our case, that would be US8. And then we need to authorize with our app ID probably. The authentication this time happens through HTTP basic, so let’s go over to our MailChimp account and look into our account options here under extras, we can get our API key, and here we have our API key that we copy and do some special authorizations, so the basic authorization and the user name in the case of MailChimp can be anything. I’m just gonna put “anything” and the password, our API key. That is something we want to request with our data, and now it’s been added to the header of our request and we should be able to send over request already. Here, we get our account information back. Now we can look into the developer reference and see how we can, for example, add a user to a list, so let’s go over to list here, and let’s say we wanted to create a new member of that list. What we would need to have is the list ID, and then we can create any member. What do we have to send in? The email address, the status at least. Okay, let’s do that. First of all, let’s find out, what is our list ID? Now, we could look it up in the interface, but we could also just put in lists right here, and send this request over in order to see what kind of lists we have. We actually have one list and the Id is this ID right here, so we will add that to our request as well, and then we can go into our members. Let’s send

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Why Every Marketer Should Learn JavaScript

Why every marketer should learn JavaScript (feat. Mike Arnesen)

Why should you learn Javascript as a marketer?

If you are on your way to get deeper in the technical marketing field, this might be a question that you already came up with.

In this weekly episode, we invited Mike Arnesen who’s the owner of upbuild.io, a boutique marketing agency that helps its clients with technical marketing, such as SEO, CRO and analytics.

We took our chance and asked Javascript related questions that might be relevant for Techmarketers.

Questions in the video:

1:27 Why is Javascript so important to learn as a marketer?
4:19 What are the implications on talking to developers and communicating with your clients?
7:07 What are use cases of Javascript in your work?

? Links mentioned in the video

Full length video: https://techmarketer.io/mikearnesen
Mike’s Website: http://www.mikearnesen.com
Mike on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mike_arnesen
Upbuild: http://www.upbuild.io
“Two years of Upbuild” Blogpost: http://bit.ly/2sSNs4B
AppScript: https://developers.google.com/apps-script/
Google AdWords Script: https://developers.google.com/adwords/scripts/
Google Tag Manager: https://www.google.com/analytics/tag-manager/
Google Analytics: https://www.google.com/analytics/

? More from Measureschool

Correct Google Analytics Setup Course: https://measureschool.com/products/google-analytics-course/
GTM Resource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide
Free GTM Beginner course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
Courses: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

? Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

? Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

? FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
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– In this video, Mike and I are gonna talk about why every marketer should learn JavaScript. On more, coming up right after this. Hi there, and welcome to another video of measureschool.com, where we teach you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and on this channel, we do marketing tech reviews, tutorials and the occasional interview just like this one. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing. Now, this week I had the chance to talk to Mike Arnesen, he runs upbuild.io, a boutique marketing agency that actually helps people out with technical marketing specifically. So they do SEO, CRO and analytics as well. Now, if you wanna find out more about upbuild.io, head over to their website and their blog where they also have some great tips on newest marketing tech, tips and tricks on how to do a little bit more of the technical things in digital marketing. But in this interview, I talk specifically with Mike about his technical skillset and why he thinks that marketers should definitely learn JavaScript if they want to become a technical marketer. Now, we’ve got lots to cover, so let’s dive in. Let’s talk about the topic we wanted to talk about today, why marketers should learn JavaScript. So could you give us a first take of why do you think JavaScript is so important to learn as a marketer?

– Yeah, I think we talked about understanding the underlying principles of how things work on the web. Like it or not, JavaScript is the leading backbone of a lot of the technologies we experience today. So web sites are increasingly more reliant on JavaScript. Some sites are almost completely built in JavaScript, if you’re talking about like a Node site or an Angular.js site. That’s so JavaScript heavy and understanding that is so helpful. Google Tag Manager, that is, at its core, it’s an abstraction of JavaScript. You need to understand JavaScript to understand how GTM works, and yeah, they make it really usable and friendly for someone who doesn’t have that background, but understanding that will make the lock click in your head to just be like, oh, wow, here’s this hidden power of it, and it just really expands on you very quickly once you understand like, oh, if I understand more about JavaScript, this really just becomes something hugely powerful. And then, of course, SEO. SEO is ensuring that a computer program can experience your site the same way that a user does. So if a user is seeing a site that’s just very complex with JavaScript, there’s a lot going on, there’s a lot of interactivity. You need to be able to understand why or why not is that going to transfer over to a program, so it’s like, because Google’s getting pretty good at rendering JavaScript and processing it. But the other search engines are not that far along. Google still has, I think, my general belief about Google is Google likes to think they’re a couple years ahead of where they actually are in terms of, they’re like oh yeah, don’t worry about your site, it’s great, we’ll parse all the JavaScript and process it. Tends to actually not be the case most of the time. So you still need to understand like okay, here’s where we’re running into roadblocks, here’s why that’s happening, and maybe here’s where we can solve them. And I think by understanding JavaScript, you get to solve SEO problems, analytics problems, and be more conversant with your development partners and the people you’re working with every day.

– So yeah, just to add to that, I would say that there are a lot of use cases, there’s even the PPC use cases in order to write AdWords scripts. There is, if you do any kind of CRO implementations of A/B testing–

– Absolutely.

– There are so many fields of the marketing that JavaScript touches. Obviously, you should know a little bit of the backbone as well like HTML and CSS, but JavaScript is the meta skill that basically renders everything, it’s the superpower that renders everything useless in that regard. So let us talk a little bit more about the communication part, so once you become proficient at JavaScript, what do you think are the implications on talking to developers and communicating maybe also with your clients?

– Yeah, I mean, for me personally and the people on my team, it’s been, I kinda had a pretty okay familiarity with JavaScript, but really in the past two years, I’ve really made an intentional effort to ramp up what I know and adapt to my knowledge, so I’m taking like, every couple weeks I’ll hop into a course at Codecademy and learn more about like hey, why is Angular 2 different, what’s going on there. Or like TypeScript and stuff like that. Having a baseline understanding of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, stuff like that, I understood enough of okay, here’s why accessibility and content rendering is really important for SEO. But I was always like, well, this is like SEO best practice. Everybody should make sure their site renders, of course, obviously. So when I ran into a site that was built on Angular or React or Node or anything like that, and it didn’t render with that JavaScript, I would kinda get annoyed ’cause I’m like, how did these people not know that, of course, they should totally do it. But once I dug deeper and understood more complex topics around, like let’s continue with the Angular example. So taking three courses in Codecademy with Angular 2. And you know, like other JSON technologies, like Ruby, for that matter, just like seeing the similarities there. It suddenly clicked and I was like, I know why developers have chosen to do this now. It makes sense, it’s totally powerful to be able to dynamically pull stuff in client side and kinda build out experiences on the fly and not put everything at a unique URL that needs to load up, query a server side database and bring in the information, it can be kinda slow. The benefits became very clear. And at an interpersonal level, that made it so much easier to be able to come to development partners from a place of empathy and be like hey, I totally get why this is awesome. Angular actually is cool. Unfortunately, there’s a little bit of workaround we’re gonna have to figure out because here’s X, Y and X about the reality of SEO today, so let’s just figure out a happy middle ground, instead of coming at it from like, hey, this site sucks, it needs to change because search engines can’t get at it. You can come from a different approach once you understand it more and speak in their terms and convey that same passion about the cool technologies. It’s super super helpful for building relationships and getting problems solved together.

– Absolutely. What are some use cases for you and the work that you have done with JavaScript? Yeah, what are some use cases where you used it on clients’ projects, for example?

– Yeah. Here’s a cool example that we, I mean, I guess that involves pretty much everything. We work with a lot of, maybe we don’t work with a lot of clients that have a lot of layers, but we work with a couple bigger organizations that have a lot of different divisions. So we work with a non-profit, they do medical research and so we worked the fundraising arm. And they really needed to basically have a popup on their site that was going to ask people to donate. They were gonna have a big campaign, and they had essentially run out of budget with their developer. And the developer didn’t have a lot of time either, so even if they had the budget, it might not have happened. And they were like, “Well, we wish “we could have this popup come up on our site “that’s going to ask people like donate, “drive them to our donation page.” And we were like hey, let’s take a crack at that. So what we ended up doing, so essentially, no one involved on our side or with our client’s direct contact could really access the code base of the site. So if we wanted to like upload the file, it’s not gonna happen. If we want to change content, it was not gonna happen. So we got actually a file in Adobe InDesign, and they were like, “Hey, this is what “we want this to look like.” So we actually went to, we just used Codepen to mock up what this code is gonna look like, we

"

How to get started with Google Apps Script

How to get started with Google Apps Script (feat. Ben Collins)

How can you get started with Google Apps Script?

Google Apps Script allows you to create add-ons for Sheets, Docs, or Forms, automate your workflow, integrate with external APIs and a lot more.

In this episode we invited Data Analyst and Apps Script Expert Ben Collins and asked him how he got started in using App Script when developing solutions that helped his clients to automate their workflows.

#GoogleAppsScript
#Interview
#MarketingTech

? MENTIONED LINKS

Full length video: http://techmarketer.io/bencollins
Ben’s Website: http://benlcollins.com
Ben’s Dashboard Course: http://bit.ly/2qBFCXu
Ben on Twitter: http://twitter.com/benlcollins

Apps Script Developer Docs: https://developers.google.com/apps-script/overview
How to pull in mailchimp data into Apps Script video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnsxGxgNVKY
Beginners Guide to starting Apps Script: http://bit.ly/2sgKaUk
Google Developer’s Channel: http://bit.ly/2r6PCLM
Totally Unscripted Show: http://bit.ly/2riURs6
Google Cloud Conference Videos: http://bit.ly/2sgY60n
Google Apps Script Forum: http://bit.ly/2rQHOPq

? MORE FROM MEASURESCHOOL
GTM Resource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide
Free GTM Beginner course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
Courses: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/
?Recommended Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books
? Gear we use to record these videos: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

? FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

– In this video David is gonna tell you what formulas to use to analyze your data in Google Sheets. All and more coming up right after this. Hi there and welcome to another video of MeasureSchool.com where we teach you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and on this channel we do marketing tech reviews, tutorials, and give you tips on better analysis just like this one. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing. Now, you might know I am a big fan of Google Sheets because I can take data from different datasets, such as Google Analytics, Facebook, AdWords, and put them all together in one Google sheet, then analyze my data there and build a dashboard of it as well. Now, once you pull in all that data from these different sources, you will probably have a spreadsheet of raw data and then you need to work with that data in order to get it in the right format, get insights out of it, and maybe also build a dashboard of that. And the tools that you are using to do all this are formulas. Now, I’ve asked my friend David from Coding For Losers, he also has a YouTube channel right over there, to come up and answer the question what are the most used formulas for marketers nowadays to do analysis within Google Sheets, and here’s what he came up with. David, take it away.

– I’m not that good at guitar, just started learning, but to me learning guitar and learning Google Sheets, you know, when I first started learning it five or six years ago, they’re really similar, similar to learning anything. You have to put in time practicing, or else you won’t get any better. And there’s learning curve. You really have to kind of learn things in a specific order, otherwise you really end up confusing yourself, more than you really have to, and having less fun. And that’s the third thing. If you don’t have fun doing it, if you don’t have fun practicing and you don’t have fun moving up that learning curve, you won’t enjoy doing it and it’s, honestly, not even worth doing. So, stick to Excel if you feel like you get it and you don’t want to get into another learning curve and have fun with it. But Google Sheets, over the last couple of years, has really blossomed in terms of what it can do. You can now use all kinds of add-ons, like Blockspring or Supermetrics, or the Google Analytics add-on. It seems like every service now, there’re so many different add-ons that you can use to pull data into sheets and really make use of it there, without having to do CSV exports and all that kind of clunky stuff. And on the other side, in terms of like display of data, Google Data Studio is now this really great free, sexy dashboarding tool and reporting tool. So, you can use Google Sheets as this kind of hub to sit in the middle of the work that we do as digital marketers, pull data in using add-ons, use sheets as your hub to calculate all your metrics and all your changes overtime and all of your stats, all the stuff you want to look at, and then push them up to Data Studio so you have a nice, clean dashboard there to share with your team or other kinds of reports. So, Google Sheets has really become the Swiss Army knife, I would say, for us, digital marketers, anyone working in startups or tech, recently, over the last couple years. But, there is that learning curve. There is a fair amount that you need to learn to be comfortable and be fluent working in Google Sheets. So, let’s talk about Google Sheets formulas specifically and kind of how you can limit your vision in Google Sheets formulas, just learn the ones that you really need to know upfront and potentially never even expand your vision outside of this set of, I would say, about 10 formulas that you really need to know to kick ass in Google Sheets. The first one to narrow your focus, when thinking about sheets formulas, are to think about the jobs they do, because they really only perform, as I’ve seen, three jobs, and those three jobs are: they’re wrangle data in terms of plucking out just the pieces of data that you need removing everything else. They snipe data for you, so something like VLOOKUP would be sniping out just the value that you need. And they count, they help you come up with all of the averages and sums and counts for all the metrics that you need to calculate, the kind of aggregation functions. So those are the three jobs really, and once you think about formulas in that way you can pick a few formulas per job and forget about all the rest of them. So, if you have QUERY you don’t need COUNTIF and examples like that. So the first job of formulas, wrangling data. Those are doing things like processing text and dates, turning a date string into just a year or a month, filtering data that you don’t need, and merging data together so taking data that’s in two tabs and putting it into one tab. And there’re a few formulas that we use to do that. For processing text we’ll use things like, formulas like LEFT and RIGHT, the TEXT function itself for working with dates frequently, date formulas like TODAY. So if you want to calculate the last week you can always do like TODAY minus seven, stuff like that. For filtering data I really frequently use IF and IFERROR, which are kind of logic functions but let you, say you have a referring URL path and you want to boil it down to a channel, you can use IF statements to classify certain texts in URL as a channel in the UTM tags. Just one kind of offhand example. Merging data, I’ll often use formulas like ARRAYFORMULA to pull together large datasets into one tab, and also these curly braces that you see here are really really helpful in Google Sheets, and we’ll get into why later. So the second job of formulas is sniping. That’s you have a specific value you’re looking for from a table of other values and you want to look it up. So, the most common usage of sniping is the VLOOKUP formula and I also, in times where VLOOKUP doesn’t work, say you’re looking, you want to look left in a table versus to the right, you can use INDEX for that instead. So VLOOKUP and INDEX are really kind of the same type of formula. And the last job of formulas is counting. Now, this is where you can get kind of crazy with all the different formulas you want to use, you can use. You can combine things like FILTER with COUNT or SUMIF, but I honestly choose to just use queries for counting. For all averages, counts, sums, max, min, all of this aggregation work I hire query to do that job. So now you’re up to speed on the three jobs that formulas do, wrangling, sniping, and counting, and about 10 formulas that you can use to do those jobs in Google Sheets. So hopefully, this will really help narrow your focus when you’re learning sheets formulas and make it a lot more fun to get started. There is a cheat sheet that Julian will link to in this video in the description and you can use that cheat sheet to really dive into the needy-greedy of learning all these formulas, work through a bunch of examples, and get some of that fun practice that I talked about with guitar. Take care.

– Alright, so there you have it. These are the 10 formulas that you should know as a marketer to analyze your data in Google Sheets. Pretty interesting, right? Now, we’ve got the links that David mentioned in the description below, but he also did a video on how to use these formulas on his YouTube channel right over there, and you can also probably click right here right now to view this video. Now if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing to our channel over there, because we’ll bring you new videos every Wednesday. My name’s Julian. Till next time!

"

Chrome Developer Tools for Marketers – The Guide

How to use Chrome Developer Tools as a Marketer

Every Marketer should know how to use the Chrome Developer Tools. The DevTools provide a great look at what’s going on underneath the surface of a website. You can efficiently track down layout issues, debug JavaScript, and get insights for tracking code optimization.

In this video, you’re going to learn how you can use Chrome’s Developer Tools as a Marketer to understand your website better.

#ChromeDeveloperTools
#ChromeTools
#Measure

HELPFUL LINKS

More about Dev Tools: https://developer.chrome.com/devtools
Google Tag Manager: https://www.google.com/analytics/tag-manager/
GTM Playlist: https://goo.gl/MfGcRR

MEASURESCHOOL LINKS

GTM Resource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide
Free GTM Beginner course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
Courses: https://measureschool.com/products

Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

RECOMMENDED MEASURE BOOKS: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

GEAR WE USED TO PRODUCE THIS VIDEO: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

Ever wonder what’s going on in your browser or when your page loads, a tracking code fires, or your site just loads and loads and loads? Then it’s time to look under the hood and examine the inner workings of your website. In this video, I’m gonna show you how you can use the Chrome Developer Tools as a marketer to understand your website better.

So I’m a big believer that marketers should become more technical, but where should they start? Well, I would say, understanding the subject of your marketing better, and this is, most of the times, the website. To make this learning experience more relevant, you should look at your own website, and understand what the marketing inner workings are. That’s why I think the Chrome Developer Tools is a great toolset to get started understanding the more technical bits of your marketing that every marketer should really know. So let’s take a look at the Chrome Developer Tools and how you can use them as a marketer. We’ve got lots to cover, so let’s dive in. All right, today, our journey starts in our demo shop, where we’re gonna take a closer look at the Developer Tools of Google Chrome. Now, the Developer Tools are a built-in feature of Google Chrome, but other browsers have such developer tools as well, or you might need to install a plug-in, such as Firebug, for the Firefox browser.

But in this video, we’re gonna specifically talk about the Developer Tools. How can you reach them? Well, if you go into your View settings, under Developer, you’ll find here Developer Tools. There’s also a shortcut that you might able to use in order to get there faster. You will be greeted with another panel here that lays over your website, and has different tabs up here. Now, we won’t go through all the different functionality, because it goes really in-depth, but as marketers, we should be aware of some of these functionalities. So let’s get started. First up, here we are in the Elements overview. Now, the Elements overview gives you a representation of the current HTML. This is different to what you see when you go to View Page Source, because this is the initial HTML file that is downloaded from the server. This is the current HTML file, as it is represented on this page right now. This might differ because of the scripts, and might download and manipulate the page in one or the other way.

So, if you wanna find the current state, you can look at this Element overview here. And, as you might already saw, when I go over one or the other line here, there are some markers that come up in the website. This is actually pretty useful, if you want to find out where in the HTML markup a certain element is placed. You can go through the Elements pane directly, and try to find out when it highlights it. The other way to do it is to right-click, and click on inspect element. So it will jump right into it.

Or there is a selector tool right here that lets you jump right to the element that you are currently pointing at. Now, how can this be useful? As you might know, HTML and the CSS code that you see right here are represented in the browser, and if you wanted to change any of the content or the appearance of this website, you would need to do this in your HTML or CSS. Now, it’s very cumbersome to go back and forth between your text editor to edit your HTML pages, then reload this page and see what the changes have resulted in, so with the Elements pane, you can easily find the element that you wanna edit, make your edits directly in this Elements pane, and then it will be represented here, and you would know what to change in your text editor or in your CMS at this stage. You can also use this, obviously, to communicate it to a developer more clearly than just telling him, hey, change the text here and there. The other panel that we can change here is, the other panel represents the CSS.

And the CSS is the markup that governs how a website is laid out, and the style elements of this particular HTML element. So, for example, here, you can change the color of certain elements, certain CSS rules on and off, or even change them. Now, I use this pane very often once I want to identify a given element and see how it is marked up in the HTML itself, so, for example, if I wanted to build in any kind of tracking on this Contact button, I would like to see, how is it marked up?

This is a list element with the ID menu-item-244, which I can use in Google Tag Manager, for example, to identify it uniquely on our page. I also use this to communicate any kind of changes that I wanna have made to a developer, and be able to tell him exactly where I wanna have something changed. It is very powerful. The third use case would actually be for conversion rate optimization. So if I wanted to change an element in an A/B test, I would test it out beforehand in this overview panel.

Then I’ll know what to change in my A/B testing tools, such as Google Optimize. One other great piece of information is down here, the actual selector list, that gives me information on how I can select it via CSS, which can also be used in Google Tag Manager with the CSS Selector. The one button we haven’t talked about yet is this Toggle device toolbar, which actually puts your browser into a special state that lets you test the website on different screens, if it is responsive, and it also lets you choose different devices to see how your website looks like on this particular device.

There’s also a function to connect Google Chrome DevTools to a mobile device, but that’s not something I’m gonna get into right now. All right, let’s move on to the next panel, which is the JavaScript console. Now, the JavaScript console is a great tool, especially if you work with tracking. So, as you might have seen in my previous videos, I use this often to look up certain variables, such as the data layer, and see what the current state of this variable holds. Now, the JavaScript console is our direct access to the JavaScript runtime environment.

It can give us a lot of information, and we can even instruct our codes to log out certain information, in order to make it more visible. So, for example, on this browser, I have a tool installed called the GA Debugger, and once I activate it, it’s gonna reload the page. Let’s go out of our device mode here. And now, we have the JavaScript console filled with a lot of information, a lot of debug information, of our Google Analytics. And we can see what data was sent over, and what hit type, and so on, which lets me really easily identify any kind of problems, if there are any.

The other thing that the JavaScript console, it’s great for errors. So if I go, for example, to this error page, I can see up here, when we scroll up, that there was an uncaught reference error. There was something called that is not available. Now, if I wanted to see where this error occurred, there’s a link right here that I can click, and I go over to the Sources panel.

Now, the Sources panel is a panel where you see all the different files that were downloaded during the load process of your website. And you can open certain files and read them, and read their markup, to identify any errors. For example, right here, we see this is where the error originated, and I could change that in my markup. Apparently, a variable was called that is undefined. Now, there are many different other JavaScript functionalities to debug this. So you can set break points, for example, but I won’t get into this right now. For you, it might just be important to look at your console and see if there are any errors that are occurring and how they originate.

All right, let’s move on to the Network tab. Now, once we reload this page, we see up here that there’s a timeline that develops, and we can mark with

"

Google Optimize Video Tutorial – A/B Testing [CRO]

Google Optimize Video Tutorial - A/B Testing [CRO]

Google Optimize is the newest addition to the Google Analytics tool set. You can quickly and easily build A/B Tests with a point-and-click editor. Of course it integrates perfectly into Google Analytics as well. In this video, we are going to show you how to install and use it.

LINKS
Google Optimize: https://optimize.google.com
Google Optimize Help: https://support.google.com/360suite/optimize/?hl=en#topic=6314903
GTM Ressource Guide: https://measureschool.com/guide
Free GTM Beginner course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
Courses: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

RECOMMENDED MEASURE BOOKS: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

GEAR WE USED TO PRODUCE THIS VIDEO: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

In this video you’re gonna learn how to use a new A/B testing tool set of Google titled Optimize. I’m gonna show you how you can set up a test, run it and analyze your results. All and more coming up right after this.

Hi there and welcome to another video of MeasureSchool.com where we teach you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and on this channel we do tutorials, how-to videos and take a look at the latest marketing tech, just like this one. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing. Now, if you are into the world of conversion rate optimization, or CRO, you’re probably familiar with tools like Visual Website Optimizer or Optimizely. They make it super easy to put together an A/B test and run it on your website. Until 2012 Google provided their own tool called Website Optimizer to run A/B tests, but then they integrated it into the Google Analytics Suite as Content Experiments. But it was never that powerful, it really wasn’t really able to manipulate your variation with a drag and drop editor, like VWO or Optimizely is able to do. So now they came up with a completely new product called Optimize. Previously it was only available for Google 360 customers, but now made accessible for free, as well. So it’s time to take a look at this new tool. We’ve got lots to cover, so let’s dive in.

Today our journey starts at optimize.google.com, which the home of Google Optimize. Now, you might not be able to access this page just yet, because currently Google Optimize is in private beta at least for the free version. But you can sign up to a waiting list and get emailed when an access is available. Once you’ve signed up, you are greeted with this dashboard here, which will give you an overview on your running tests. Before we can actually start using it we need to go through some setup steps. The first step being creating your account and container. Now, same as Google Tag Manager or Google Analytics, you have a hierarchy of your account and then separate containers for the different websites you’re running your tests on. Unfortunately right now you are only able to build one container for one account. I don’t know if this is gonna change later, but this is probably a restriction of the free version. Now, you might notice that the container ID features a GTM here, but the ID really doesn’t have anything to do with Google Tag Manager at this point, it is simply the ID of this container. You can name your container, as well. In order to keep the overview I have called this Demoshop. Once this is done, you need to link up your Google Analytics account. That means you need to have Google Analytics installed on your web page and your Google account needs to access to this Google Analytics property. Then you can link it up by choosing your account and the view. Next step is implementing the Optimize snippet. Now, the snippet consists of two parts. One part is the extra requirement of the Optimize plugin, and yes, it’s a Google Analytics plugin that needs to be loaded with your current Google Analytics code that is installed on your website. And there’s a page hiding snippet. Let’s talk about this plugin snippet first. If you have Google Analytics hardcoded on your website, you simply need to add this line to your Google Analytics code on your website. You can also do this through Google Tag Manager. Let’s try this out really quickly. Go over to Google Tag Manager, click on New Tag, and there is actually already a tag template available. Right here, it’s called Google Optimize. Simply click on that, and then you need to define the Google Analytics Tracking ID that this plugin belongs to. I have fortunately saved this already in a constant variable right here. And then we need to input our Optimize Container ID. Where can we find container ID? That’s this code with GTM in front of it right here. Let’s copy that, go over to Google Tag Manager, input that here. Now again, this has nothing to do with your Google Tag Manager ID that you might have from Google Tag Manager itself. This is a Optimize Container ID and has nothing to do with Google Tag Manager. Before we continue let’s give this all a name and choose our trigger. Now, you can use the Ald Pages trigger or define a more narrow trigger to only apply this on the pages you actually run an A/B test on. But this doesn’t generate any overhead, so I’ll just go with All Pages here. Save this. Let’s go into our preview and debug mode, see on our page. And again, we already have Google Analytics running, now our Optimize tag has been added, as well. So this seems to work. Let’s go over to Google Tag Manager and publish this as a version. And Google Optimize is now installed on our web page. Now, what is this second snippet for? This is actually a page hiding snippet. Now, this is totally optional to install but it will basically take care of these little flickers that you sometimes see with A/B tests. So what does that mean? Once the test that we’re gonna configure in a second loads, our Optimize snippet will take care of the changes that are happening to this website. You might have seen on not-so-well-setup A/B tests that the page loads and then suddenly an element changes, which is not desirable because the user might have seen the control before he saw the variation. So we want to make sure that only the variation or the control are shown, and therefore we need to take care of the changes first before we show anything to the user, and this is what this snippet is for. Unfortunately we cannot install this by Google Tag Manager, because Google Tag Manager loads codes asynchronously and we cannot ensure that this is loaded before anything on a web page loads. So we will need to install this manually on our page if you want to run an A/B test on this page. So let’s grab this code here and implement it onto our HTML which means we need to place it before Google Analytics starts running, which is the earliest point of our Google Tag Manager code. So we need to implement it above that right here. Now, you might need to ask your developer to do this for you. We are running here on WordPress so I can easily go in and edit the themes and add my code to the appropriate place here. Update this all. Reload our page here. And we should see our page hiding snippet above all Google Tag Manager code. This is recommended to do in order for your users to only see the variation or the control and not a flicker effect when it switches over to the variation. Let’s click on Done here, and we have installed the Optimize snippet. Now we can go over to creating our experiment. All we need to do is create experiment here, give our experiment a name, choose the URL we want to run this on, and now we can build an A/B test, a multivariate test, or a redirect test which means that we will give Google Optimize two URLs and it decides where to send a user based on which variation should be shown. I will go with a simple A/B test here and see how to set this up. Let’s create this. We are entering the test details screen. Now, on this screen, you can set up a new variation. Let’s do this by clicking here New Variation, give it a name, add this, and now we need to start making changes. How do we do this? We will simply go to Editor here, save our last changes, and in order to do this we actually need to install a Chrome extension. So you need to be running on Chrome in order to do this actually. Let’s click on this Chrome extension and install this to our browser. And it will give us this little new tool, which is the Optimize extension. What will this do? We can go back to our page here. Let’s actually leave our preview and debug mode first so we have a bit more screen. Reload this. Nothing happens. That’s because we actually need to go through the interface of Optimize. And it takes us to the screen, and now loads with the help of the plugin our editor where we can make changes. So this is pretty powerful because we can now point and click and edit our elements to our testing needs. It’s advisable that you come up with a strong hypothesis before you start changing stuff around here that actually are worth testing and not do what I am about to do and just change the button color of this button here. But this is just for demonstration so let’s go with this easy A/B test. You see we have a very extensive set of things that we can change. If you are more on the technical side, you can even edit HTML, insert HTML, or run custom JavaScript to change the elements on a page and build the variant that you have defined beforehand. Alright, let’s change the color here with the editor. This is actually the text color, we should go for the background, and here we can change text color to green. That should do it. Let’s go ahead and look at the other elements here. We could change stuff around but our green A/B test here should do the trick. Some other features of this editor is actually you can change the screen size to see how your A/B test changes if you have a mobile-responsive page. You can also edit the CSS of the element directly, and you have other settings to use this editor more effectively. Once you have done all the changes that you wanted to do, you can save your variation, click on Done. Now we need to go ahead and choose an objective for our test. These are defined by the goals that you have already configured within your Google Analytics account. So if you don’t have any goals implemented, you should definitely do that, and you can even define a secondary objective and even more objectives to run this test against. In order to keep track of your changes and why you did this test, you can enter a description, or your hypothesis, and save this all. And you are ready to start your experiment. Now your experiment is running and is generating data. What does that actually mean? So let’s go back to our page. Reload this page. We get shown one or the other variation, so in this case it’s our variation and not our control. Once we reload this page, we actually always get shown our variation. Why is that? Because Google Optimize actually builds a cookie into our browser. We can check this in our developer tools by going into the Application tab. We can look at our cookies that were set on our Demoshop here, and we see a new cookie called gaexperiment which tells Google Optimize which variation should be shown. It also connects us to declined ID that we see here in our ga cookie, and this ensures that the user always sees the variation that he has seen first. So it doesn’t skew the results once the website is reloaded or the user navigates away and comes back. Just to demonstrate this here, let’s get rid of these cookies and reload our page. You still get the green button here. Let’s do this again. And again. And this time we see we are getting our normal button here, our control version. That means that the A/B test is already running correctly and data should now be generated within our Optimize account. So once we go over to Reporting here, we should have data coming in. This can take a while so right now we don’t see anything here. Let’s go over to a test that I have already run. This is our button test here and we have a 50/50 split between the users who see the original and our green button version. We have a Sign Up goal that is running on our website and we have some data that is already reporting. This was tested on 323 sessions, has been running for six days. Obviously it’s not a very great sample size. Google Optimize then tells us how much better the variation is performing, in this case minus 60% right now, against our conversion goal that we have defined. And we can see this familiar chart where we can look at the probability that our variation will beat our original version. Down here another chart. Obviously this is also connected to Google Analytics, so we can always view these numbers in Google Analytics itself. Once we click here, it opens up a special report where we see our button test, and we can segment with our custom segments here, and also we see our original and green button. This is kind of like the report that we have seen for the Google Content Experiments already. It gives us a bit more variety to play with the data and actually look into other goals that this might be running against in order to slice and dice the data even more and see whether our data is performing well or not. But all in all you can see that Google Optimize works really well with Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics together, and is therefore a very affordable and cool little addition to the Analytics Suite, and lets us run A/B tests or multivariate tests really easily on our website through this point and click editor. There you have it. This is how you can set up an A/B test with the help of Google Optimize. Pretty sweet, huh? I’d love to hear from you. What are your experiences with Google Optimize? Or do you prefer Optimizely or Visual Website Optimizer? I’m looking forward to hearing from you in the comments below. And as always, if you like this video, please share it with your friend or colleague and subscribe to our channel to get more of these videos every Wednesday. My name is Julian. Till next time!

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How to Install and Track Events with Autotrack

How to Install and Track Events with Autotrack

Autotrack JS is a plugin for Google Analytics that allows you to track events, social interactions and media queries automatically. In this video, you will learn how to install it with the help of Google Tag Manager.

— http://analytics.blogspot.com/2016/02/introducing-autotrack-for-analyticsjs.html
— https://github.com/googleanalytics/autotrack
— https://ga-dev-tools.appspot.com/autotrack/

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RECOMMENDED MEASURE BOOKS: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

GEAR WE USED TO PRODUCE THIS VIDEO: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

– In this video, I’m going to show you how you can install the autotrack.js plugin for Google Analytics in order to track events, social interactions, and media queries automatically with Google Analytics. And we’ll do this with the help of Google Tag Manager. So let’s dive in. Hi there, and welcome to yet another video of MeasureSchool.com where we teach you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and in this video we’re going to talk about autotrack.js which is a plugin for Google Analytics. Before we dive in, let me say that I changed my mind a little bit about Autotrack. It’s not one of the features that I use a lot because it’s actually a little bit cumbersome to install. And I think that it’s much better to learn Google Tag Manager instead of trying to install Autotrack because you have much more granular control over the implementation when you install the same tracking with Google Tag Manager. That said, Autotrack is still a viable option if you have a new implementation and you just want to track the basics with Google Analytics. So how would we install this? First of all, we need to load the autotrack.js feature on our site. This is a script that you can download from this page and upload it to your website so that it’s available when the page loads. So I’ve done this in our demo shop. I got the autotrack.js feature prepared so it’s under our root directory here, demoshop.com/autotrack.js. And it’s available to our Google Analytics code. The next thing we need to do is actually install Google Analytics. Now we’ll do this with Google Tag Manager. This is actually not recommended if you have already Google Tag Manager running but I don’t actually work with manual installations of Google Analytics anymore. So I want to show you how you can do this in Google Tag Manager. They give us a different snippet that we can install. So we’ll just go ahead and copy this. Go over to Google Tag Manager and we’ll go with a new tag. And we’ll call this Google Analytics and it’s a page view tag which will find all pages. And just put the notice in here that this is with Autotrack. Alright, next we choose the product. But unfortunately, our normal tag template for Google Analytics will not work with Google Tag Manager because we have no way of implementing autotrack.js with the tag template. So we’ll need to go with a custom HTML tag where we can paste our code. And obviously, we need to customize this a little bit. First of all, we need our UAID which we can find in Google Analytics itself. Under the Admin section in Properties we have our tracking ID which we can copy and transfer over to Google Tag Manager right here. The second thing we need to customize is the actual path to Autotrack. In our case, it’s on our root domain so I can just go with /autotrack.js. So now, this is implemented. We just need to choose our trigger which is on all pages and create this tag. Let’s go into our preview in debug mode and see what it does for us. So I’ve opened up a page here called demoshop.com/autotrack where I’ve implemented the features that we can track with Autotrack and see how they work. So first of all, Autotrack claims that it can track outbound links automatically. And I have an outbound link here to Google.com which I will press with the Command key pressed so it opens up in a new tab. Alright, and we can go over to Google Analytics in the real-time reporting and look under Events. And we just fired at one event. It’s in the event category Outbound Link, and event action click and the label is Google.com. So this worked automatically. We didn’t have to install any kind of event tracking on this element, and it works as expected. So Autotrack does a good job of checking up on link clicks. This is actually also true for outbound forms. So just to do another test here, let’s say we click on this link here. We go to WordPress. And we have another event. It should, in a second, pop up here. Here we go. And it went to wordpress.org So that works as expected. Let’s look at more events that we can track which is declarative event tracking. So I’ve made an event link here. And if you look into the HTML and inspect the HTML, we can see that I’ve implemented this link with the data event category attribute, data event action attribute, and data event label. So any link that is tagged up with these attributes correctly should be checked automatically in Google Analytics. So let’s try this out. I click on this link with the Command key pressed again. So it opens up in a new tab. And we should see something in our event report. Let’s get rid of this filter. And we see a new event which I tagged with Autotrack. Click, and the event label, event. So declarative event tracking also works perfectly with autotrack.js. Now the next feature that it claims to track automatically are social clicks. And if I like this page here, I have a normal Facebook button implemented. We should see a social event in Google Analytics. Social events are not easily seen in the real-time reporting. We don’t see any event being fired. Social events are actually part of the social report that we can find under Acquisition. And we can see within the plugin report here which social actions have been taken, so, for example in our case, the Like. Unfortunately, it takes a while to populate these reports, so we need to check back later if this worked correctly. But fortunately, we can also look into our Tag Assistant and see what was fired into our Google Analytics. And we see a social event was fired here: what was transferred, the action Like, the network Facebook, the target, and the title. So this also works correctly and as expected. So Autotrack does a good job of tracking social events. Now the other features here are a little bit more cumbersome to demonstrate. But one feature I want to show you just because it’s interesting is the media query tracker which should be able to track different breakpoints, resolutions, and the device orientation. Unfortunately, this doesn’t do it by default. We actually need to configure something in Google Analytics and in our tracking code. So let’s see what needs to be done. First of all, we need to create a custom dimension. In our case, I just want to show you this feature and implement device orientation for our demo here. So let’s go over to Google Tag Manager into the Admin section. And then under the Properties settings, we go to Custom Definitions and there we can implement custom dimensions. Go into here and create a new custom dimension. The custom dimension will be called orientation. And it’s scoped on a hit basis. We’ll keep this active and all we need to do is now remember the dimension slot. In our case, this is number six. So let’s remember that, and in the next step we will configure our tracking code. For that, we need to actually look into the syntax that needs to be put in place. And it says we can just copy this and put it into place for our require method. So let’s click Again into our page view tag. Open that up, and instead of our Autotrack require, we just implement the just copied code. Here we go, and now we need to configure our plugin so it sends over the right events. Now if you have implemented breakpoints as a dimension and resolution, you could leave that all in here. But I only put in orientation, so I’m going to just delete this out of our options so it only picks up the orientation for now. Now we need to specify the dimension index which in our case was number six. And we should be all done. Let’s continue this. Save it and refresh our preview in debug mode. And then go back to our page and refresh this as well. And now I will go into the Developer Tools which I can do in Chrome under View and over here are the Developer Tools which will open up this little console. Up here I can actually choose if I want to view this as a website or as a mobile device. So if this is ticked, we would need to choose our device here. We have here Nexus 5. And we can actually switch over the different modes of landscape to portrait, which correlates to the actual orientation. So a custom dimension should be sent o

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How to Use Redirects to Track Links,Downloads & More

How to Use Redirects to Track Links

https://measureschool.com/redirecttemplate

Tracking email links, downloads, and others outbound resources accurately can be challenging. In this video, I show you how you do all these with a combination of redirects Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics.

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Free Email course: https://measureschool.com/emailcourse
Free Resource Library: https://measureschool.com/resources
More Measure Courses: https://measureschool.com/products

?Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

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RECOMMENDED MEASURE BOOKS: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

GEAR WE USED TO PRODUCE THIS VIDEO: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

– In this video I’m gonna show you how you can track links, downloads, and other outside sources more precisely with the help of a tracking redirect which we will install with Google tag manager. So let’s dive in. Hi there and welcome to another video of measureschool.com where we teach you the data driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and in this video we’re gonna talk about how we can track our external clicks and downloads more accurately. I have an email here that I sent to myself, and sometimes you get these emails where there’s a link to an outside resource, like this PDF, and there’s actually no way for Google Analytics to pick this up because we can’t install Google Tag Manager or Google Analytics inside of a PDF. We can only install it on webpages that actually can communicate back to Google analytics. And also in our tool, like our email tool, we can’t install any kind of Javascript codes. So how can we circumvent that? The one suggestion I have here is through a redirect. So for example, when I click this link, I first go to my page, and I’m being redirected to the resource so in that step in between Google Analytics can pick up an event that then can be seen in Google Analytics as a download event and the resource that we redirected to. So this is a neat way to actually see if your user actually clicked on or viewed your resource. So how can we install this with the help of Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics? First of all, went ahead and built a page that shows a little bit of a graphic which you can leave out if you want to. It just signalizes that the user needs to wait until he’s redirected. Now on this page there is no Javascript, no redirect just yet, all the magic happens actually in Google Tag Manager. Let’s go over to Google Tag Manager and right now in this account that I just opened up we just have a Google Analytics page you tag installed and now we want to install our redirect method. Now the first step is to actually import our tag template which you can also do on the measureschool.com/redirecttemplate and all you need to do is click on import and get the jason file and import it to your account. It will be one tag, one trigger, and actually two more variables installed but they are also some built in variables that will be activated on your account. So let’s do this and now you should see in the variable menu two new variables, the redirect variable and the redirect parameter variable. Now let me explain quickly what those are. The redirect parameter variable just looks into the URL and sees if there’s a query string in there called redirect. And this is the key word that we need to use in our query string. So for example, on our download page we would have a query string called redirect and then afterwards we would have our URL that we want to send the user on to. In this case for example, Google.com Now if you click that, and reload the page, nothing happens quite yet because we still need to install our tag which calls the second variable that we have installed the redirect variable. And this is the actual variable that will redirect your user on to the page that we have defined in the redirect parameter. Now there is also a time out of one second installed just so we can actually see what is happening in the browser but you can remove that if you don’t want to actually show this download screen to your user and it would just redirect the user on right away. So what will we do with these two variables? Simply we’ll just build an event in Google Analytics with a bit of a twist? So let’s go ahead and create a new tag. This will be our GA tag which will track downloads and be fired on a redirect. We’ll choose our product which is Google Analytics, and then our tag type which is Universal Analytics, and we select our tracking ID which I have already saved up in a variable. Next step is to choose the track type which in our case is an event, and we can give it a category, our case download. We could also call it redirect or whatever you want. And in the action I will put in the actual the redirect parameter which we’ll send the user on to to get his resource. The other ones we leave free for now. The important thing is to choose as the non interaction hit true so it doesn’t affect the bounce rate. And now the magic happens. We will implement a hit call back under the more settings you can choose field to set and add a field. Now we’ll choose the hit call back to call a function once Google Analytics request was sent successfully. And the function that we want to actually call is our redirect variable. Now what will this do? Again if the Google Analytics event hit is successful it will call this redirect variable and send the user on. That’s very important because we don’t want to send the user on to the next page too early. We only want to send them on once the user has been actually tracked in Google Analytics. So we built in this call back in order to ensure that the redirect doesn’t happen before the actual event hit. Now we can go ahead and continue this. And just define a new firing trigger which I will define as redirect and it will fire on the DOM Ready event and not on all pages but only on pages where our redirect parameter is actually defined so we’ll just go with does not equal undefined. Okay great, now we are ready to go. Let’s create this trigger. And create this tag. So let’s try this out in our preview in debug mode. Back to our download page. We already have here a redirect installed and if we reload this page should now be redirected onto Google.com which happens. Now let’s go into our Google Analytics and we see that there’s an event that just fired where we had a download that was redirected onto Google.com. So it all works as expected and we can go ahead and publish this as a version to all our users. Now in order to use this correctly, you can actually just take any side of your website and simply attach a query string with the redirect parameter and tell your user where he should be redirected on to. So for example, in our case, can redirect them on to our resource guide. User comes to the page and then is redirected. And we see all this in Google Analytics as well. It’s why I told you, you don’t really need the download page, but it’s just a little bit nicer for the user to see what is happening while he’s waiting. And this is how you can install a redirect method on your website in order to track certain downloads that come from outside sources, like an email newsletter, or an external website, that you actually have control over. In order to decorate the link with the redirect parameter. It’s also a great technique if you want to track links in your email newsletter that go to outside sources. For example, you redirect on and you recommend somebody, and you want to track that link through a redirect method. But you could also use it on your website itself. If you prefer this method over the methods that I’ve shown you previously where you can actually track the button click directly. And that’s already it with this week’s video of measureschool.com If you want to download the variables and tags that I’ve just explained to you then head over to measureschool.com/redirecttemplate and install those directly into your account without having to type out the actual code in your variables. And if you like this video, Please subscribe to our channel, because there is more to come every week. My name is Julian. Until next time.