Google Data Studio Tutorial (2019) ๐Ÿ“Š – How to build a Dashboard with GDS

Google Data Studio is Google’s prime tool to build Data Visualisations. Today, Ahmad of Siavak is going to show us how to make the most of this Analytics tool and build a quick dashboard for us.

๐Ÿ”— Links:

Google Data Studio Tutorial Playlist – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0rV4ZS-ruQ&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGijmrFPjYSeKwLbnsqwq1e

Google Data Studio – https://datastudio.google.com/navigation/reporting

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿ”€ GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
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It’s 2019. And one of the hottest products from the Google Analytics line is probably Google Data Studio. They have improved the tool so much over the last few months and over the last few years that I wanted to update our tutorial on Google Data Studio. Now, I’ve asked Ahmad to come up with a quick overview video on talking you through the most important features of Google Data Studio, how to build a dashboard with it, and go through the general process of creating a dashboard and sharing it out to your stakeholders. Now, this is by no means a complete tutorial. All the features that are out there, and Google Data Studio this will take far too long. But we have a playlist on Google Data Studio where we explain certain features in mode, so check those out as well if you’re interested. But for now, we got lots to cover, so Ahmad take it away.

Thanks, Julian. This is Ahmad from Siavak. And in this video, I’m going to give you a quick overview of Google Data Studio. Data Studio is a free tool from Google that allows you to connect to and pull data from different data sources like Google Analytics, Google Ads, Facebook Ads, or even Google Sheets, and then easily create visual reports to share with your clients, stakeholders and team members. In this video, I’m going to show you many features of Google Data Studio as we create this awesome ecommerce reports together. Exciting, isn’t it? Let’s dive in and see how it works. This is the main interface of Google Data Studio. We can see your previous reports in the middle and at the top, you can choose to start with a template or create a blank report.

We are going to start with creating a blank report. The first thing we need to do is to connect our report to a data source. We can do it by clicking on Create new data source. Google Data Studio can connect to a lot of different data sources. There are free connectors available for Google products, such as Google Ads, Google Analytics, Google Sheets, or even Google Bitquery. And for everything else, we can use partner connectors. Partner connectors allow us to connect to many different data sources like Bing, Facebook, Instagram, Adroll, etc. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’re going to hit cancel. And it starts with the sample Google Analytics data provided with Google. collect data reports, and we are good to go. First things first,let’s give our report a name.

Next, let’s add the header. We started creating a rectangle, resizing it and changing its color. Next, we’re going to add a title. You can select the text, change the color, and change the size of the font, and also resize the widget and move it to better place. Now let’s add some numbers to our reports by adding some scorecards. Score points are good for showing KPIs or key performance indicators. Basically, any number. I’m going to head to is style tab to give our scorecard a border and round the corners. Let’s adjust the padding as well. And then I’m going to head over to the data and enable the date range comparison. So I’m going to compare this metric to the previous period. And here he appears. Now that we are happy with the scorecards, we can duplicate and create more. This retains the styling and the configuration for the date. The only thing we need to do is to change the metric. For this one, let’s choose transactions. We can drag it over to replace the metric. Or we can continue this process to make more scorecards. For this, I’d like to have product detail list. Drag and drop, and we’re done. Next one is a revenue.

And I’m going to change this one to show a compact number. Next up average order value. So as you can see, I can just type in here to search for all the metrics that are available in my data set. It’s a drag and drop them to the left to change the metric. Now let’s create some room for our final metric which is ecommerce conversion rate. I’m using my keyboard to move the scorecards around. And I can even control C and control V on my keyboard to copy and paste and create a new ecommerce. Now let’s see from which countries are we getting our revenue from. For this purpose, I’m going to add a map to the report. Now each shade represent the number of sessions, but we’d like to replace it with revenue. See which country bringing more revenue to our commerce store. And just to make it clear for the end user that what metric is being represented by this graph. Let’s add a title and call it revenue by country. Next, let’s see some trends. By adding a time series charts to our report. Just like the scorecards above, I’m going to give it a border and also change the radius for the corners. Let’s decide what numbers do we want to show on this chart. I’m going to head over to the Data tab and search for some metrics. I want sessions to be either, but they also want to see product detail we use product adds to cart and transactions.

Let’s duplicate this and create another chart for revenue. Right click and select Duplicate. Ok. So now I’m going to remove the metrics and replace the final one because I’d like to see the trend of revenue over time. But for this chart, I’d like to see how revenue builds up over time during this time period. Now if you’re going to duplicate this and create not a chart to show e-commerce conversion rates over time. I’m using my keyword to move this around. Just like before, you can head over to the Data tab, search for metric and replace the metric on the chart by dragging dropping the new metric over the previous one. For this one, however, I don’t want it to be cumulative. So uncheck this but I do like to see a trend line. Cool, isn’t it. Now let’s add a pie chart. To see the distribution between male and female users. Drag it over here choose gender as the dimension for this pie chart, and we can leave the metric to be the number of sessions. I’m going to head over to style tab. But I want to move the legend over the top just to make some room for the next visualization we want to create.

Now let’s use this space to create another chart and see which cities are we getting the most revenue from. For this purpose. let’s choose the bar chart, the horizontal bar chart. Move it here, resize it to fit, adjust the size to make room for the name of the cities, changed the metric to revenue. Premium sessions and change a dimension to city. Our ultimate commerce reports is almost finished. Let’s see how does it look for the end user. Looks nice, doesn’t it. But there is a problem. This report is a static and the user cannot interact with it. They cannot choose the time period or take a look at different segments of data. So let’s go back to edit mode and add some features and interactivity to this report. The first thing we’re going to do is to allow the end user to change the time period after report. And this is done by adding a date control filter just like this. Going to head over to this time tab and change some colors to make it visible. Now, the reviewer of the report can easily choose the timeframe for which they want to look at this report just like this. Now let’s go back to edit mode and add some more cool features to this report. I’m going to select these all, bring them down to make some room for the extra features we’re going to add.

First, we’re going to add a drop down menu that allows users to take a look at traffic from different source mediums. This is done by adding a filter control to report. By default it sets to medium as its dimension, we’re going to change it to source medium. Again, we’re simply dragging and dropping. Next, I’m going to duplicate this. Create another one for device category, which basically means desktop, mobile or tablet and allows them to look at traffic only from desktop devices, the tablets or mobiles. And finally, I’m going to duplicate again and allow the end user to filter my user time. Which basically means is that the new user or a returning users. Now let’s review our report again and see how does it look. Now it’s possible for the end user to filter this report base on any of these criteria. For example, they can choose to only look at desktop traffic. And all the numbers and charts will be updated to reflect the choice.

Now that we created this ultimate ecommerce report together, it is time to share it with others. Let’s take a look at different sharing options we have access to in Data Studio. The first option is to download the report as a PDF form. And we can even protect it with a password. The next option is to set up automatic delivery of the report via email. So Data Studio, emails a PDF version of this report to the email addresses that you choose on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. We can simply create a link to this report. Or we can share it with other people, just like any other Google Drive document. Just like a Google doc or Google Sheet, you can get a shareable link, or you can share this report with the specific emails. So as you can see, there are lots of options for you to share a report with the people who need to review it. Okay, I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s video, in which we learned how to use Google Data Studio to connect to a data source and create a beautiful, interactive and fully functional report and share it with others in about 15 minutes. I’m going to post a link to this report in the descriptions. So you can review it and grab a copy for yourself to play around with. To make a copy of the report inside your own Google Data Studio account, simply click on this little icon. That’s it for today. Thanks for watching.

All right, so there you have it. This is a quick overview on Google Data Studio, how you can use it and hopefully you know now if you should use it for building your dashboard. It’s pretty easy actually. But there are some quirks of it. So I also encourage you to check out our playlist which I’ve linked up right over there which will show you a few more details of Data Studio and a few more specific details on how you can utilize the tool for effective dashboard building. And as always, if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing right over there to our channel because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian. See in the next one.

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Most Important Chart Types in Google Data Studio (feat. Ahmad Kanani)

Google Data Studio has several chart types thus allow users to create and design their reports in unlimited ways. In todayโ€™s video, Ahmad of Siavak is back, this time to show us the 6 most significant charts in data studio. Plus, he will give us some tips and tricks on how to design your data visualization dashboards more efficiently.

๐Ÿ”— Links:

Siavak – http://siavak.com/

Google Data Studio – https://datastudio.google.com/

Chart Types Reference – https://support.google.com/datastudio/answer/7398001

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿ”€ GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, Ahmad is going to introduce you to the most important chart types within Data Studio. And he’s going to give you some tricks on how to build more effective dashboards in Data Studio. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measure geeks. Julian here back with another video for you. Today, we want to talk about Data Studio and data visualizations. Now, you’re seeing we are remodeling right now our little studio here and I’m thinking what should I put in the background? Let me know in the comments down below. Today, we gonna talk about Data Studio. And this is a quite new tool in a Google universe. So it’s always evolving further and further. There’s always stuff I learned from different people. And today we want to learn from Ahmad who’s going to show us the different chart types within Data Studio. He’s also going to give us his tricks on how to become more effective in building a dashboard. He’s actually going to build a very small dashboard in this video

in a very short amount of time. Now we got lots to cover. So Ahmad take it away. Thanks, Julian. This is Ahmad from Siovak. And today I’m gonna show you 6 useful charts in Google Data Studio and we are gonna create this simple report dashboard together. Okay, let’s begin. First, I’m going to create a new blank Data Studio report. And I’m going to create a new data source for it. For this tutorial, we’re going to use Google Analytics and we are going to connect to Google Analytics demo account.

Let’s choose the Master View. And connect. It takes a few seconds, and then you can add it to your report. Click Add to report. And we are ready to go. The first data visualization side we’re going to create is a scorecard. Scorecard is best to show KPIs with key performance indicators. To do this, let’s go and add a chart. Choose a scorecard.

Resize it a bit and position it our canvas. As you can see the scorecard chose a metric, we can change the metric, for example, to sessions.

We can drag and drop sessions over page views for it to change. We can see the date range of this metric. So this is the number of sessions over the last 28 days. And we can also have a comparison to the previous year, previous period, or a custom time period. I’m going to choose previous period and hit apply. We can also filter the scorecard to show the number of sessions only for segments of our audience. To do this, we can add a filter.

Let’s for example, say viewers only say countryย equal to United States. Hit Save. Now it reloads to reflect the number of sessions from users from United States. We can also change the name and title of the metric to US only sessions. So it’s clear what’s number is a scorecard is going to represent. Let’s revert it back to default. And remove the filter. Because I’m going to show you at the end of this video, a really cool trick and a new feature of Data Studio that is actually more useful. The scorecard right now is pretty basic. So the next thing I’m going to do is to apply a bit of a styling to the scorecard. We can go to the style tab, choose a background and border and border radius. For background, we can use a solid color, or you can use a gradient from top left to bottom right. And let’s choose from white to a light gray.

Let’s change the border radius to four and add a light gray border as well. Okay, this looks much better. Now let’s copy and paste it to create three more scorecards. So control C and control V to create another one. For this, I’m going to show revenue.

For the next one, I’m going to show transactions. And for the final one, I’m going to show e-commerce conversion rate.

That’s it. Now, let’s say we want to see the trend of sessions over the time period of last 28 days. This is only the total number. But if you want to see the trend, we can use another data visualization chart, which is a trend line. We can either add a trend line or time series directly from the menu. But because I want to keep this styling, I can do this from another way. Let’s see, I can copy and paste this to create a new one. As you can see, the metric is still sessions and the comparison time period is set. I make it a bit bigger to come here to this menu and change the type of the chart from a scorecard to time series chart. That’s it. So we have our time series here, which we can adjust. It’s already showing sessions during the timeframe of last 28 days. Now let’s create another type of visualization that shows us the top five acquisition channels that send traffic to this website during last 28 days. I’m going to copy and paste again because I want to keep this styling. And now I’m going to change the charts type from time series to a horizontal bar chart. Let’s close this. And for the dimension, I want to use default channel grouping,

which is the acquisition channel for these sessions. I want to sort it not based on the name of the default channel grouping, but based on the number of sessions descending. And then in this time tab, I can choose to show only the top five channels. Now I’m going to make it a bit smaller and resize it a bit. That’s it, we know the number of sessions, we can see the trend of sessions over time. And we can see the top channels that have been sending these users to our website. Now let’s say we want to know the geography of and the countries that are sending traffic to this website. I can copy and paste this again, resize it a bit to make it bigger. And then I can change the type to a geo map. The dimension automatically changes to show the country and in shows the number of sessions per country based on you know the shade of the blue color. The darker the country, it means the more sessions we had from this country. The next chart I want to create is an area chart. An area chart helps us to see both the channel contribution to the traffic and the trend of users over time, we already know what to do copy, paste. And the reason for copy pasting is just simply retaining the styling. Otherwise, you can come here and add a area chart quite easily. And once here, we can change it to this area chart. For the time dimension we’re using date, of course. And for the breakdown dimension, we’re going to use the default channel grouping.

Here, we can also go to this style tab and change the number of series to five. Because we want this to match to the bar chart above. As you can see, we can now see boosted trend of sessions over time, and also the distribution of the default channel grouping per date. Next, let’s see some demographic data. We’re going to use a pie chart to show the ratio of male and female users to this website. Let’s copy and paste the bar chart and change it either to a pie chart or a donut chart. They’re basically the same, they only look different I like the donut chart. Let’s make it a bit ticker. And in data, let’s choose gender as the dimension of this pie chart. Now also, I’d like to come to the style tab and change the position of the legend. That’s it. Congratulations our simple dashboard is ready. We can preview the dashboard. Or you can also share it with your client or the end user. If they hover on any piece of the pie, or bar, or any data into the top online, or any country, they can see the actual number of sessions or any other metrics that you have on your visualization. But other than that, it’s a static report, they cannot interact with it. So if they click, nothing happens, it’s basically stays the same. So now it’s time for the cool trick that I promised to show you. Let’s go back to edit mode, we want to make this dashboard a bit more interactive. Let’s start by making the pie chart interactive. You can select the visualization widget. And on the Data tab at the end, we have interactions, and we can choose it to apply filter. Now let’s see how it behaves. Now that we’ve enabled the interactions for this pie chart, if we hover and click on any piece of the pie, every other widget in this dashboard will get updated to show us the data for that segment only. Let’s try. Now every other widget on this dashboard is updated to only show the number of sessions for male users. We can click again to reset it and go back to default. Now let’s go back to edit mode and enable interactions for the rest of the widgets, for the map, for the area chart and for the timeline. And so we have a totally interactive report dashboard. We can click on organic search to see data all for organic search which is coming up with an error. I don’t know why. We can click back to reset, we can click on the US to only see the other data for US users, just like what we did with the manual filter or the sessions at the beginning, and then can click back to return it. We can also apply two or more filters at the same time. So let’s say female users from United States. Let’s click again and reset. So we have two types of filtering and a report interaction Data Studio. The first one is filtering which is clicking on a segment on a graph to filter the rest of the widgets on the same report dashboard. The second one is called brushing, which is the selection of a time period on a chart like time series on an area chart to update the rest of the widgets in the same document to only represent the data for that time period. You can select the date, or any time period that you want.

That’s it. So to recap, today, we learned about six most useful charts and Data Studio and how to use them to create a simple report dashboard like this and it looks good and beautiful as well. We bring scorecards, time series, bar charts, area charts, a map and a pie or donut chart. Plus, we learn how to make our dashboard interactive for the end user. Now it’s your turn, go make some cool dashboards and share the links in the comments section. Thanks for watching and good luck.

All right, so there you have it. Thanks Ahmad for this quick introduction to the different chart types and how you have actually built this dashboard in such a short amount of time. I’m still amazed by this trick of duplicating your data visualizations and then there’s changing the chart types so you don’t have to do all the styling over again. Something I will keep in mind the next time I build a dashboard. What have you taken away from the video? I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. And if you haven’t yet, then maybe consider subscribing right over there to the channel because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian.

See you in the next one.

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๐Ÿ”ด First Look: Data Blending in Google Data Studio

Google Data Studio Data Blending lets you combine data sources in one visualization. Letโ€™s take a look at the new Data Blender together and see how the new feature works.

#DataVisualization
#GoogleDataStudio
#Dashboard

๐Ÿ”— Links:

Google Data Studio Tutorial https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGijmrFPjYSeKwLbnsqwq1e

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, we’re going to take a first look on the new data blending feature in Google Data Studio. All and more coming up.

Hey there, welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data driven way of marketing. My name is Julian, and we are live right now talking about the new Data Studio feature of data blending. Now, if you are aware of our other tutorials we did on data studio, you might know that we took the work around at that time, at least to pull in data to Google Sheets blend it together and then importing it into our Data Studio dashboard. This gave us a lot of flexibility. But at the same time was a little bit inconvenient. Now Google has done something about it, or at least the Google Data Studio Team, because they have announced the community connectors that actually let us pull in data from different data sources, then the Google products into Google Data Studio. So we can now pull data through third party connectors, like super metrics directly into Data Studio with these new functionalities of these data connectors. And that is important for Facebook ads. Now,what we are not what we were not able to do is actually take that data and then blend it together with other data sources. What do I mean by blending? Well, if you wanted to have data from Facebook ads, and Google Analytics in one table on one visualization, that was not possible to do within Google Data Studio, you would still need to go back, for example, to a third party system like Google Sheets, or a database blend the data there together and put it then into Google Data Studio. This has now been fixed with a new feature of data blending within Google Data Studio and we’re going to take a first look. So without further ado, let’s dive right into our little demo here.

So I’m here at Data Studio, let’s just come up with a completely new report. And at the beginning, we are asked to choose our data sources. Now, I’ve already connected my facebook account and my Google Analytics account, I actually want to just demo this. And let’s find out how many clicks we had on our Facebook ads campaign. So I’m adding this to my report. And we get our familiar Canvas em, now I will work with dates. So I’m going to just put this date picker right here and select the range,let’s go to some old data we have in the system from November,let’s go with the 15th year. Okay, so this is already pre put in here. Now, the next thing I want to do is actually make a table. And in this table, I want to show my Facebook ads not by campaign name, but actually by that date. So up here, we can choose our dimensions and our metrics, what I want to do is choose the data dimension, so we have appear time and this the super metrics connector to Google Data Studio, that you can then connect to your Facebook ads account, I have done this in this case, we are simply go with the date dimension. And as you might know, dates are in a in a spreadsheet, they are really the columns that you put in here. Now for the rows, I actually want to not have impressions here, I want to show the actual clicks that we had on our campaigns. So I’m going to go here to campaign and go with the link clicks.

And let’s get rid of, well, we can leave in the impressions doesn’t really matter. Now, what I want to do is actually know how many people converted. What I can do from my Google from my Facebook data is, obviously if I use the conversion tracking of Facebook, I can put that in as well. But Facebook will always give me different data, maybe that will be a great thing to actually compare if I can find the right metric here. Because as you might be aware, the website conversion value, Facebook API gives us a lot, a lot of data to look into. And I don’t, I’m not quite sure how I tag this, if this is just a custom conversion.

Let’s see if that does the trick. Yes, we have custom conversions here. So this is what Facebook actually records from the facebook pixel. Now, I want to compare this with Google Analytics data, right? Google Analytics has a different attribution modeling going on. Because you might know that Facebook is really looking just at how many people come to their website, click or come to the website, and then convert and they look back, if there was any contact point with Facebook, it will be attributed to Facebook. And Facebook will show that Google Analytics is different to that because its last click wins, or the last source that brought the traffic to your website, and then converted how many people that and how does that compare to Google Analytics. Now, I could do this in spreadsheets, obviously. But for demonstration here, we want to actually blend this data with our Facebook Ads data. And there is this new functionality here in the data sources where we see blend data. And I’m going to click this,ย  this opens up this new menu down here, where we have our data sources. And we can blend multiple data sources to each other or into each other I guess. The data source that we are predominantly using right here is Facebook ads, this will be our primary data set, I’m going to add a data set to it. And available sources here, I’ve already connected this is my Google Analytics account. So I’m going to add this to the report.

Now, we have two reports in here. And we want to join this. Now, in order to join data with each other, you will need to have a Join key. Join key and databases, they’re also called primary keys are date metrics that you have in both data sources that are aligned to each other. So in our case, it would be the date obviously, the data is not is in Google Analytics and in Facebook ads, and it would atch that up correctly. What you could also do, if you have tagged your UTM parameters in your Facebook ads correctly so that through, for example, the source medium or the landing page so, you need to have a join key in order to align this to the data sources together. And we have date here so that is all fine. Now the last thing I want to do to make this a little bit bigger is to actually add a metric to this, now that that data is aligned, we can add the metric. And in our case, I want to just take a goal completion on my case, it would be the email sign up, find the right one here. That is the goal completion. Yes. And we’ll just drag that in. Let’s save this and see what it does for our table. Now we have our email signups in here. Now, you might notice that this is kind of screwed, because we have that many link clicks. And we have so many email signup. So it’s much higher than we would expect here. For the clicks that we are getting on this day. Maybe it’s much higher, it’s actually a little bit beneath it. But what you always need to keep in mind is that when you pull data from a second data source, that doesn’t mean that it’s automatically filtered based on the data source that it’s connected to. So in our case, we actually would need to say, or these email signups that we see right here are email signups that are originated from maybe different sources that came into our Google Analytics account. These are the totals of all goal completions on that day, just added to this, this table here. And therefore, we need to go in and actually implement a filter. So we can add a filter here. And we’ll just call this Facebook traffic. We want to the data sources master and only include we have here our dimensions, let’s go with the source medium and condition should contain Facebook.com. I think that’s what I entered as the as the UTM parameter so that should be correct. Let’s just save this, save this again. Now our data should be filtered down, or at least that column of email signups to only the Facebook data. So here we go, we see that it’s much lower, and the sources have been attributed differently. So we can look at what Facebook actually says it generated 71. What Google Analytics says it generated from our Facebook source quite interesting to see. Now if I would be honest, I would like to know the conversion rates, right. So I would like to put in a another column here saying what is the conversion rates between the link clicks and a website conversions. This is easily done for a native data source. So if we have Facebook ads, just as a data source or just Google Analytics, we could build a custom metric or a custom calculated metric from this. Unfortunately,this is not something you can easily do or not something I found in the interface at least to be something that you can do in the blender data form. So once you use blender data the custom metrics out of the play you can’t know the you can’t calculate the link clicks, conversion rate to the email signups of goal completion for. That said,probably something that they’re gonna fix at some point. For now, if you really need to do this, I guess you would need to go to something like Google Sheets Connector again, and do this first and Google Sheets and then import the data.

But overall, a pretty interesting feature that they have added and it was something that people needed. It also just simply breaks up the whole data silos, silos, right? You have data silos. Now you can import them into one dashboard. But they’re still silos in itself. But now you can blend them together and have much more interesting insights, I think in terms of comparing data, putting it together from different systems. That is really the power of building a custom dashboard. Then just looking at a dashboard and Google Analytics or on Facebook ads, this is something that we really needed and it’s now implemented into Google Data Studio.

Alright, that’s it for this little demo. If you have any more questions, then please leave them in the comments below. We also have new videos coming out all the time and live streams so be sure to subscribe to this channel and also check out this video.

My name is Julian. Till next time.

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๐Ÿ”ด First Look: Pivot Tables in Google Data Studio

Pivot Tabes in Google Data Studio give you the ability to display your data in a table with multiple dimension at the same time. This gives you the ability to use Data Studio for Data Exploration but also it gives you a new ability to display your data in this Dashboarding Tools.

#PivotTables
#GoogleDataStudio
#DataVizualisation

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๐Ÿ”ด Google Data Studio Connectors (for Facebook Ads and more…)

Letโ€™s chat live about the new Community Connectors announced for Google Data Studio. We now have the ability to Facebook Ads and more directly to Data Studio, which opens up a lot more capabilities.

#GoogleDataStudio
#Measure
#DataVizualisation

๐Ÿ”— Links mentioned in the video:

Suerpmetrics: https://supermetrics.com/blog/data-studio-connectors/?aff=1014
Offical Announcement: https://analytics.googleblog.com/2017/09/google-data-studio-quicker-and-broader.html
Ben Collins: https://www.benlcollins.com/data-studio/community-connector/

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

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๐Ÿ”ด Data Studio Course: Summary und Live Q&A | Lesson 4

We have build a Dashboard. Letโ€™s summaries our approach, see some more resources about data visualization and answer your questions Live.

Watch the full Course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVsSXFhjyUc&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHchZpGaCBD6EA8kWrBEhYf&index=1

Q&A Section:
19:32 How to change the default Week day start?
21:40 Alternative to Supermetrics?
27: 40 One Report different sources?
28:57 Report Drop Down menu for sources?
30:29 Best way to compare 2 date ranges?
31:49 Best report for overall performance?
34:34 Connect DataStudio and Google Optimize?
37:35 Supermetrics is it an Agency license?
39:49 What data is available in Supermetrics?

๐Ÿ”— Links mentioned in the video:
Supermetrics: http://supermetrics.com/?aff=1014
Data Vizualisation Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/data-visualization-books
Ben Collinโ€™s Course: https://benlcollins-data-school.teachable.com/?affcode=69396_b3spab2w
Davidโ€™s course: https://learn.codingisforlosers.com/data-studio-the-lazy-way?coupon=MEASURE
Data Studio Gallery: https://datastudiogallery.appspot.com/
Tableau Gallery: https://public.tableau.com/en-us/s/gallery
YouTube Channel: DataSaurus Rex https://www.youtube.com/user/datasaurusrex
Stay up to date with Data Studio Changes: https://support.google.com/datastudio/answer/6311467
Lea Picas Present Beyond Measure Podcast: http://www.leapica.com/podcast/
Facebook Ads Manager for Excel: https://www.facebook.com/business/m/facebook-ads-manager-for-excel

#LiveQandA
#GoogleDataStudio
#DataVizualisation

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

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Facebook Ads Dashboard with Google Data Studio | Lesson 3

Facebook Ads Dashboard with Google Data Studio | Lesson 3

Facebook Dashboards can be easily built with Google Data Studio if you have prepared the data correctly. In this lesson we are going to visualize our data set and build our Dashboard complete with date control, filters and calculated fields.

You are going to learn how to calculate custom metrics, change their metrics name, layout your dashboard, build the visualizations required, build filter and date controls and make it all look pretty.

The template can be found at https://measureschool.com/facebookdashboard

Previous video: http://bit.ly/2uoa4qA

#GoogleDataStudio
#FacebookAdsDashboard
#FacebookPixel

๐Ÿ”— Links mentioned in the video:

Full Playlist: http://bit.ly/2hkwUx4
Google Data Studio: https://www.google.com/analytics/data-studio/
Google Sheets: https://www.google.com/sheets/about/
Supermetrics: http://bit.ly/2hmxvOR

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

– Alright, so now that we have prepared our data in Google Sheets, we are ready to visualize it. We’ll first calculate our metrics, then lay out our dashboard, and then, finally, implement our data in Google Data Studio. All and more coming up right after this. Today our journey starts in Google Data Studio where we’re finally gonna visualize our data in our dashboard. Let’s start out by clicking on a blank sheet here, blank new sheet, and then choosing our data sources. So we can create a new data source and we’ll choose our Google Sheet. Now, from our Google Drive account, we’ll pick the sheet that we had prepared in our last lesson. Let’s do that. Now we can see that we can actually choose the different worksheets as a source. This is actually something that is unfortunate because you can only choose one worksheet as one data source. So you couldn’t say okay, I wanna choose the GA data from here and the Facebook data from here, and combine it all into one data source. No, you need to have them on one sheet in order to make this work. That’s why we prepared the data this way. Okay, let’s go over to Google Sheets and choose our combined datasheet, and then we can choose under the options to use the first row as headers. That is fine with me. If you look at the datasheet, this would describe our data, so we can pull that in. And we can include any kind of or filtered cells, which is not the case in our sheet, so I can untick this. You can also choose an optional range if you have data on that sheet in a special range. This will be all for us under the configuration. Let’s connect this all. And we will pull in our different dimensions and the different metrics. Now, as you might remember, in our last lesson we actually prepared that and looked into the metrics and dimensions that we want to pull. Unfortunately, first of all, these are not exactly the same name that we want to display them on the actual dashboard, and therefore I would recommend to actually rename them right here. It’s pretty easily done. For example, link clicks should just be clicks. You can just click on that and change the name around here. The amount spent will just be our ad spent. Our transactions are just our conversions, and our transaction revenue is actually the revenue. The campaign name, let’s rename that in just campaign, and the ad set, and the ad name can stay the same. All right. So now we have renamed our dimensions and metrics, but we also wanted to calculate some metrics. So for example, here’s the CTR which is impressions divided by our clicks, and we can easily input that by going into Google Data. So we’re clicking on this Plus button, and it will let us input a name, which in our case was the CTR, the click-through rate, and then the formula would be impressions, and it already pops up, our impressions from down here, divided by our clicks. Alright, let’s create this field, and it’s now part of our dataset. With calculating metrics, these are custom, so Google Data Studio doesn’t always know what kind of type it is, and this is actually a number but it’s actually a percentage. So you need to make sure that you choose that correctly. We’ll auto-aggregate that, that’s actually something we can’t really change. So let’s go ahead and do our other calculated metric, CPC. CPC is the cost per click. So let’s click on the Plus button here, CPC, and this would be the ad spent divided by the clicks. Alright, create this field. This is a number, that’s correct, but it’s also a currency, so we can choose that as well. Let’s pick US dollar here. And we have all CPC metric. Let’s go ahead and calculate the CPO, the cost per order. So let’s click on the Plus button, cost per order, that would be the ad spent divided by the order transactions. We called it conversions. All right. Create this field. And we have one more left, return on ad spent. Return on ad spent. This would be our ad spent divided by the revenue. Alright, that should do it. Now, we have a few more left that are actually manually inputted. This is something we could put into our sheet but it’s actually easier to update it manually in our sheet. Because sometimes Google Data Studio can actually pull the data from a sheet for certain cells. Okay, we have our data sources ready, let’s add this to our report. And here we go, now we have that available in our data sources if we choose to visualize anything. Right we you see our data range and our metrics, these are now available here. Okay, before we start out visualizing anything, let’s get clear on what we are trying to do. Fortunately, we have prepared a wireframe in our first lesson, so we know what we want to build and have an idea of what elements should be on our dashboard. So on this dashboard we have kind of like a three column layout here, and three columns here. Let’s mock that up really quickly in Data Studio, and we can choose the rectangle tool to do all this, just so we can get the proportions right. Because we don’t wanna mess with all the layout later on once we have our data together. This will make this whole process a whole lot easier. So let’s just mock this up. So now we have laid out our information, what goes where, and this is actually also a great template that we could use later on if you would like to build a new dashboard. So you can go ahead and actually make a copy of this and rename this in some kind of fashion to template so you have that available later on as well. Okay, let’s continue here with our report. Let’s fill this all with data now. So we’ll go ahead and fill out these panels. Up here we would have our controls, so that would be our campaign but also our date picker. So let’s put that in place. Date picker and filter control. Right here there’s actually a new filter control. This is for the different views of Google Analytics. That’s not something that we would use here. Okay, so we can get rid of the panels in the background, and this should give us capabilities of showing us the right campaign and the right date. Let’s view this and here we can see our different campaigns. There’s null. That is something we would investigate with our raw data again. And then we have our date picker, so that is all working as expected. Alright, let’s continue with these metrics groups here. Before we start out, I want to actually select the date range so we are working with dates that actually make sense for us, and in our case it would be the July date range. So I’m just gonna change this to this week here, and that will make all our data appear in that realm, and if anything goes wrong here, we can also adjust it later on. So let’s go ahead and build these metric groups. Now in our wireframe we see that we have these groups of acquisition, cost and conversion, and inside of them we have these different metrics that are represented by the actual impressions, the CTR and the clicks, and then also the comparison if it went up or down over the last period. So how do you implement this? You can do this with the scorecard elements. So we’ll just draw on the canvas here our scorecard element and choose the right metric, so in our case it would be impressions. And we can actually, this is a pretty big number, go into Style here and press on Compact Numbers, and this will make this a bit more compact so we can actually read it. We want to have our comparison metric, and for that to actually appear we need to implement this second date range so to compare date range, and this should compare to the previous period. This will give us this little number. Now you don’t see this actually, so I’m just gonna change this around and make the inside transparent. Okay. And before we move on and copy this over, let’s style this a bit so we don’t have to do this later on. We can easily copy it over and change the data around. So we want to have our CTR. That doesn’t make any sense so maybe there’s something wrong in our metrics. Let’s create a new metric or go to this menu and we have here our CTR. This should be not clicks, impressions, but clicks divided by impressions. Okay. Let’s update this field. And we see our data also changes. Now we als

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Combine Data Sources in Google Data Studio | Lesson 2

Combine Data Sources in Google Data Studio | Lesson 2

In this lesson we’re going to setup our data sources in Google Sheets with the help of Supermetrics. We’re going to pull data from Facebook Ads and Google Analytics and prepare it to later be used in Google Data Studio.

Google Sheets combined with Supermetrics is a great way to control data that later goes into our data dashboards – it gives you the possibility to change data around, clean it up and even combine data sources (which is not possible in Google Data Studio itself).

Previous video: http://bit.ly/2f4FgZl

#GoogleDataStudio
#DataSources
#DataVizualisation

๐Ÿ”— Links mentioned in the video:
Google Data Sheet: http://bit.ly/2tUX3EF
Full Playlist: http://bit.ly/2hkwUx4
Coding is for Losers: http://codingisforlosers.com/
Ben Collins: http://benlcollins.com/
The Dashboard Plan: https://measureschool.com/dashboardplan
Google Data Studio: http://bit.ly/2bcb7zt
Google Sheets: http://bit.ly/1GAUvK5
Supermetrics: http://bit.ly/2hmxvOR

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

– In this lesson, we’re gonna set up our data sources in Google sheets with the help of Supermetrics. So we’re gonna pull the data from Facebook ads and Google Analytics. And then prepare it so it’s ready to be used as a source within Google Data Studio. All and more coming up right after this. Welcome back to this course. So in this lesson we’re gonna prepare our data sources in Google sheets. Now why do we go the route of Google Sheets as a source rather than all the other data connectors that are available within Data Studio. Well there are multiple advantages, but the first reason being that Google Data Studio doesn’t have a connector for Facebook ads yet. I don’t know if they’re gonna implement it at some point. I hope so, but it’s a Google product. So maybe they’re gonna leave themselves some time with the Facebook ads. But there is actually a tool that we can use in order to pull the data in and that is Google Sheets and the combination with Supermetrics. Now Supermetrics is a third party tool, an add on that you can install to your Google sheets account and then you can pull data in from various sources. They have many more data connectors than even Google Data Studio has and it’s a very versatile tool, and we’ll get into that in this lesson. But that’s not the only reason. Google Sheets gives us the opportunity to work with our raw data that we get from the tool like Facebook ads or Google Analytics before we then import it. We can actually change the data around, we can clean it up and most importantly, we can combine data sources. So that’s not possible within Google Data Studio itself to combine different data sources and then calculate metrics from that. So really, with the sheet, we have much greater control about the data that actually goes into our dashboard and if you run into any issues, we can investigate our data sources first and find out the error there. And that’s really why I love using Google sheets as this bridge between our raw data that comes from the tool and Google Data Studio that we will use for our visualization. Alright, enough said. We got still lots to cover in order to make this work. So let’s dive into today’s lesson. Alright, we will start out with a new Google sheet. And let’s think about what we actually need to make this dashboard work. We need our metrics and dimensions. Now just a recap, metrics are basically the numbers that you will have in your table later on, and the dimensions are the different properties that you want to divide your data by. And the table metrics will be represented by the different rows here and the metrics that would be in those rows. And the dimensions would be on top and represent the different columns. That’s important to think about, so we pull the data correctly. Next up, where do we pull the data from? Let’s go through a little bit of an exercise here. Let’s look at these metrics and decide where we would get them from and the impressions would come from Facebook. The clicks, as well from Facebook, then the CTR would actually be calculated. So this will be a calculated metric. The ad spent, as well from Facebook. The CPC, as well calculated, as well as the CPO. Then we have the revenue, which would actually come from Google Analytics and the conversions, also from Google Analytics. Now this is actually an attribution topic here. If you trust more the attribution of Google Analytics, then you want to pull that into your dashboard and we will do this in our example. Next up the return on ad spend, which is also calculated at the end. The ad budget, which will be put in manually. As well as the target CPO and the target CPC. So now have a good overview of what metric comes from where and what data we have to pull. Let’s talk about briefly about the dimensions because dimensions are the different columns that we want to pull. Now, these are obviously heavily based on our Facebook campaign. We have our date, campaign name, ad set, and ad name. But as we have seen, we want to also pull data from our Google analytics account. Now how would that be represented in Google Analytics? We may have the date available but not the campaign name, ad set and ad name at least by default in Google Analytics. And that’s what we need to actually connect both tools together in order to have all these dimensions in both tools. And that is done through UTM parameters. Now if you’re not familiar with UTM parameters, we have another video on that. But basically you need to make sure that when you input your campaigns into Facebook, you need to be clear on the campaign name, campaign content and campaign term that you would choose beforehand. Then you can go ahead and tag your link. So in this sheet, we have a link that we prepared in order for our campaigns to be tagged correctly and then when the user clicks on that link or goes to that URL, he will be automatically registered in Google Analytics with these campaign parameters. So make sure in Facebook, in your ads campaign, that your campaign name, your ad set name and your ad name actually, is tagged up correctly. So there’s an option for that which is called UTM parameters. You need to have these UTM parameters attached to your link in order for Google Analytics to register this correctly. So once the user clicks on the link, it will be registered in Google Analytics itself. So once you go to your source medium reports, you have here Facebook CPC. And then we would have our campaign name. So let’s put that in as a secondary dimension. This is called campaign in Google Analytics. Then we would have our ad content, which is the UTM content parameter. So here we have interest brands. And we would need to have our keyword, which is our UTM term, that we also fill with these parameters. So again, you need to make sure you tag them up correctly and send the user to the right link in order for this data that we want to break our metrics down by is available also in Google Analytics. So this actually only works if we have these dimensions in both Google Analytics and Facebook. Now in Facebook, these might be called date campaign name, ad set and add name. In Google Analytics itself, these would be called date campaign, ad content and keyword. Different naming convention, but essentially we should get the same data in Facebook when we query for this then in Google Analytics for these different parameters. So be sure you have the same data so you can connect it in your Google sheets later on. Alright, now that we are clear on what we need to pull from where with what dimensions, let’s go ahead and prepare our data sources. I’ll open up a new sheet here and call this Facebook data. And the second sheet called Google Analytics data. Now we can go ahead and pull our data with the help of Supermetrics. Now if you’re not familiar with Supermetrics, you can actually install it by going under the add-ons and go to get add-ons, and simply enter Supermetrics, and you can install it to your account. Now the capabilities that were used within Supermetrics are a paid feature, so you would need to upgrade your account. But for anybody who’s trying this out, you can use the Pro features for 30 days. So once you have it installed, you can go to add-ons and then on the Supermetrics, launch the side bar. And now you will be able to configure your query. Alright, first up, we will choose our data source. Now, Supermetrics has many data sources available and therefore it is more powerful than what the building capabilities of Google Data Studio actually provide. So you can pull in a host of other data into your dashboard if you choose so. And we will go obviously with our Facebook ads account. Now we need to enter our Facebook details. So you need to go through the process of registering this with Supermetrics, so it can pull the data into your account once you have that you can choose your account and then select the account, if you have multiple accounts, under you log in, then you can choose your different data sources and different accounts that you want to select. And we go on to actual date selection. Now how much data should be pulled here? There are differ

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Google Data Studio Dashboard Preparations | Lesson 1

Google Data Studio Dashboard Preparations | Lesson 1

Donโ€™t start implementing your Dashboard without having gone through some preparations. In this video weโ€™re going to go through the essentials steps to prepare your implementation of an effective Dashboard.

1. Exploration
2. Definition
3. Sketching / Wireframing

Previous video: http://bit.ly/2uwbUIh

#GoogleDataStudio
#DataVizualisation
#Dashboard

๐Ÿ”— Links mentioned in the video:
Worksheet: https://measureschool.com/dashboardplan
Google Data Studio: https://www.google.com/analytics/data-studio/
Google Sheets: https://www.google.com/sheets/about/
Supermetrics: https://supermetrics.com

๐ŸŽ“ Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

๐Ÿš€Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

๐Ÿ“š Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

๐Ÿ“ท Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

๐Ÿ‘ FOLLOW US
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

– Welcome back. In this lesson we are gonna talk about the preparational steps that you need to undertake in order to build an effective dashboard. We’ll go through some questions you need to ask your audience, assemble all the different metrics and dimensions you want to pull from your tool and sketch out your different visualizations that you later want to implement in Google Data Studio. All and more coming up right after this. Alright. In this course we’re gonna go through a three-step process in order to build our effective dashboard. First of all, we go through the preparation steps which we’ll do in a second here in this lesson. In the next lesson we’re gonna talk about the data setup and get our data sources ready so we can then in the last lesson visualize our data in Google Data Studio. But for now we are just gonna go through the preparational steps and these are very important. What does this actually entail? Well, before you begin implementing anything into different tools, you might want to ask yourself a few questions and this really goes into the exploration phase, what kind of dashboard are you trying to build, talk to your target audience, look into how they are analyzing their data maybe nowadays and what your dashboard will bring to the table. Then we’ll go into the definition phase where we’ll actually look at all the different metrics, dimension data and the sources that we need to have ready in order to build our dashboard and once we know what data we want to visualize we can actually start sketching out our wireframing, our dashboard on paper or in a wireframing software. So, let’s go a little bit more in depth into these steps. So, first of all, in the exploration phase you would ask questions. Now, who’s this data dashboard actually for? Be very clear about your target audience and then actually talk to your target audience, what they see the dashboard actually doing for them, what’s the goal of the dashboard, why do they want this dashboard to be built? How should this dashboard make their lives easier? Now if it’s for example about data analysis, then you might want to dig deeper and find out how they are doing data analysis without the dashboard at the moment. How can it actually save time? What data points are they looking at? What analysis are they going through? What are the different steps that they’re going through in order to get to insights. Now, all of that feedback should be taken into account once you conceptualize your dashboard so your dashboard actually fulfills its purpose for the target audience. Now, this might look like, in our case, take the Facebook optimizer that actually you would ask for questions asking what are your most important KPIs? What do you want to have on this dashboard. When you log into Facebook in the morning what steps are you going through? Why is that frustrating? How can that be solved through a dashboard? And you might get answers just like these that actually tell you a lot about what this dashboard should accomplish for the client, for the audience, for the user and that’s also how the dashboard can be really meaningful to the user because it actually saves some time and you’re actually using it in order to make decisions or get a quick overview in order to know where to dig deeper. So, this Facebook optimizer would maybe say I need an overview over my KPIs, I’m really going through these steps in order to optimize my campaigns, I’m looking at that data, I’m doing this analysis, and if the dashboard would help me to do this all faster, then it would be something that I would use. Now, there’s nothing worse than putting time into building an awesome dashboard that nobody uses. So, talk to your target audience and find out what they want on this dashboard before you start implementing anything. Now, once you’ve gone through that phase, you need to actually get some definitions straight. From the interview you probably elicited different metrics, different dimensions, and different sources where this data comes from and this is something that you need to write down in order to be ready for the next part when we pull the data actually from the system and prepare it in Google Sheets. If you don’t prepare that beforehand, first of all, won’t get clear on your visualization but may also find yourself going back and forth between your data extracts, the data that you want to display and the actual visualization which can be very distracting and not very efficient. So, get clear about the metrics, so for Facebook ads dashboard you might want to know how many clicks, how many impressions, what was the click through rate, what was the ad spend and so on. Put that all down onto a sheet of paper or into a document, so you’ll know what to look out for once you prepare your data in the next step. Now, once you have all the different data points that you want to visualize, it actually comes down to thinking about the visualization. How can I tell a story with my dashboard? And I’d recommend that you actually take time to look through other dashboards, look through other implementations of Google Data Studio dashboards, as for example the Google Data Studio gallery that you can see different visualizations from but also ask yourself how useful is this for my dashboard? Does it actually make sense to display the data in that way? Will it help my target audience to do what they want to do with the dashboard, for example, get you insights or keep a clear overview? Don’t overcrowd your dashboard and actually you can also look through other dashboards of other companies, of other tool vendors. There are also great examples that we will link up in the description below that you can check out and get inspired before you start actually sketching and wireframing. Now, for our example in this course I went ahead and built a little sketch in a tool called Balsamic. You can check that out in the description below as well, where I thought about okay, what story do I want to take my user through? What would be the visual layout? How would we segment the data later on? What is important to my target audience? And this is where I came up with this little sketch here where I said I want to have on the top my control panels where I can choose the date but also dig deeper into a campaign, then we would have our most important metrics in the first row and in these columns we would have the acquisition, the actual costs and the conversations, so we get a quick overview on how that is doing. Then we’ll go through and answer the most important questions such as how is this stacking up to my ad budget, my targets that I have in place already? Give some more context on the click versus cost per click price, the spend versus the revenue, we also probably also put in the whole return on investment metric and then down below we would have some more analysis in form of a table where the user can really dig into what campaign didn’t do so well, what was the driver of the growth of my campaign, or to the client and which ad sets should I be looking into further? Remember, the real goal here was to give a quick overview for a Facebook ads manager on how the performance of the campaign is doing and maybe also giving some points in order to ask more questions, dig deeper into the data, go into the Facebook ads interface and optimize his campaigns. So, I’d recommend for anybody to sketch out or wireframe your dashboard beforehand and get very clear about the visualizations that might make sense for your target audience to reach their goal. Alright, so there you have it. These are really the essential preparational steps that you should go through to build an effective dashboard. Now, if you want to think through this by yourself for your client or the dashboard that you are building we actually prepared a worksheet for you that you can download at measureschool.com/dashboardplan and there you can fill out this worksheet and really get clear on the message that you want to convey to your audience. And if you’re ready to proceed, then head over to the next video right over there and if you haven’t yet, then consider s

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