How To Track The Initial Traffic Source with GTM (feat. Julius Fed from AnalyticsMania)

Google Analytics by default attributes the last known source to the User. But what if you wanted to know which source initially led to a conversion?

In this video, Julius from AnalyticsMania will show us how we can track the initial source of traffic, save it to a cookie and port it into a custom Dimension.

#InitialTrafficSource
#GoogleTagManager
#Measure

🔗 Links:

Script used: https://gist.github.com/measureschool/47a5ec08dff86ca117196abf5ce746f4
AnalyticsMania: https://www.analyticsmania.com

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, Julius is going to show you how you can track the initial source from where your user came from in Google Analytics. All and more, coming up.

Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. But today we have a guest and he’s back on the channel again. Julius from Analytics Mania has joined us to show us a new tracking technique. Now, you probably know in Google Analytics, how to view your source data and where your user that came from. Well, that’s oftentimes just half the truth because it’s heavily based on sessions, which means that you really just know where your user that came from last but not initially. If you wanted to track that you would need to explicitly track it in Google Tag Manager, for example. Now today, Julius is going to show us how we can track that information in Google Tag Manager, and then forward this on to Google Analytics. So we have it available as a custom dimension. Now we’ve got lots to cover. So Julius, take it away.

Thanks, Julian. One of many awesome Google Analytics features is acquisition reports. Thanks to this information, you’re able to see where your users are coming from, whether it’s a Google search, email, Facebook traffic, or any other sources. Every time a new visitor session starts, Google Analytics checks where that visitor is coming from. But what if you want to track the very first traffic source that drove the visitor to your website? Luckily, that is possible with the help of Google Tag Manager and some custom JavaScript. Before we continue, I would like to mention that custom JavaScript that I will use during this video was based on the UTMZ cookie replicator created by the team of Lunametrics. But keep in mind that the code that I will use is a bit modified compared to the Lunametrics code. All right, so let’s start. Here I have a Google Tag Manager container that has two items in it, the Google Analytics page view tag and Google Analytics settings variable. Now, the first thing that we need to do is to get a JavaScript code that reads the UTM parameters, the referral data, and all other information related to the traffic source of the visitor. And that information is then stored in a first party cookie that we will use in our Google Analytics tag. And here is the script itself, you will find the link to this code in the description of this video. So just let’s copy it and go to Google Tag Manager tags,

create new tag, tag configuration, choose custom HTML and paste the code. Let’s name the tag, CHTML, which stands for Custom HTML. And let’s call it Set that initial traffic source.Let’s fire it o n all pages, at least for now. And let’s take a look at how it works in action. Hit the Preview button and go to the website that you are currently working on. Click Refresh. And here’s our preview and debug mode. Now, we need to check whether the cookie that contains the initial traffic source information was actually created. If you are on a Chrome browser, collect this three dots in the top right corner and choose more tools, developer tools. Go to application, and under the storage section, choose cookies and click the domain that you are currently working on. Keep looking for a cookie that this called initial traffic source, here it is. And as you can see, the UTM campaign source is direct, UTM campaign medium is none, and UTM campaign name is not set. That is because I landed on this page just by entering the address in the address bar. Now let’s see how our custom JavaScript code works under the circumstances. But before we do any test with that code, first, you need to delete the initial traffic source cookie. So let’s do that. And now let’s imagine that I want to find on Google search Analytics Mania. And if I click this link, let’s see what happens. As we can see our custom HTML tag that says the cookie has fired successfully. Now let’s go to our cookie list and see what happens there. Our initial traffic source this time is Google organic and campaign name and the keyword are not set. So as you can see, the custom JavaScript works as expected. And now let’s proceed to another step. By the way, it’s worth mentioning that when a visitor lands on a page, the Google Tag Manager with that custom JavaScript checks whether the initial traffic source cookie exists on a browser. If it doesn’t exist, then the cookie is created. If it does exist, then the script does nothing. So this means that if the initial traffic source cookie exists in a browser, Google Tag Manager will not override it and keep its original data. The next step that we need to do is to create a variable that reads the initial traffic source cookie. Why because by default, Google Tag Manager does not recognize this information. Because for example, if we click on window audit event and go to variables, you will not find any information related to the initial traffic source. So in order to read that cookie and turn it into a variable in Google Tag Manager, we need to go to Google Tag Manager, click variables, and create a new user-defined variable. Choose the first party cookie type and enter the initial traffic source. That’s called the cookie. Click Save. And let’s test whether it’s working properly. So refresh the preview and debug mode. Always refresh the preview and debug mode first, and then go to the website and refresh the page. Choose any event you want. For example, page view. And let’s click variables. What you’ll see is that the cookie, the variable actually returns the value of the cookie. Now what we want to do is to push this data to Google Analytics as a custom dimension. First, let’s go to Google Analytics and create a custom dimension. Go to admin, choose the property where you want to create a custom dimension, choose Custom definitions, custom dimensions, and create a new custom dimension. That is called initial traffic source, choose the scope of the user and create a new dimension. What we see here is that the index of our dimension is one that’s copied. And let’s go to Google Tag Manager and update our Google Analytics settings variable.

Let’s expand the settings of our variable, click More Settings, then choose Custom Dimensions and enter the custom dimension. And we want to pass to the custom dimension number one, the value of our cookie variable. So click the button right here, and choose the cookie initial traffic source variable. Click Save.

Now one last thing that we need to do is we need to make sure that the cookie is set first before the Google Analytics tag fires. Therefore, what we need to do is we need to go to the tags section and click on our page view tag and go to Advanced settings and click the tag sequencing. We want our cookies setting tag that custom HTML tag with custom JavaScript, we want it to fire before that Google Analytics page view tag fires. So here’s how it works. When the page loads, this custom HTML tag will fire first. And after that tag has fired, then Google Analytics page view tag will follow. And it will use the cookie that was created by this custom HTML tag, click Save. You don’t need to set the custom HTML tag and tax sequencing on all Google Analytics tags, it’s completely enough to set it on only Google Analytics page with that because when the page loads, then this tag will fire first, it will set the initial traffic source cookie. If that cookie does not exist yet, then the page view tag will fire. Since we configure the custom HTML tag to fire every time before the Google Analytics page view tag, we can now remove the all pages triggered from that custom HTML tag. So let’s do that. Let’s close this one, go here and remove the all pages trigger. This tag will not have any triggers set but it will fire anyway. Because we have included that this tag and the tag sequencing. And that is displayed right here. So click Save. Last but not least, and it’s very important, we need to test whether this implementation works properly. First of all, let’s refresh our preview in debug mode, go to the page that we are currently working on. And let’s delete those cookies. Because we want to test everything from A to Z. So go to developer tools. And let’s remove the cookie that is initial traffic source. Enabled assistant Chrome extension. And finally, let’s refresh the page.

So what happened right here is that our custom HTML tag has fired successfully. Well, at least we think that it fires successfully. Now, let’s check whether it did the job correctly. Let’s go to developer tools, application. And then we see that our initial traffic source has been set and the traffic sources direct and medium is none. So half of the job is completed successfully. Now, let’s go to the tag assistant Chrome extension, click on Google Analytics and see what data was passed over to Google servers. So click here. And we see that there is a tab called custom metrics. So we see that in as a custom dimension number one the value of our cookie was set. Now do not fear, it doesn’t look that nice compared to the value of our variable right here. That’s because the equal sign is encoded right here. But if we check the Google Analytics reports, we will see that this strange code will be actually displayed properly as an equal sign. Let’s take a look at how the initial traffic source looks in Google Analytics reports. So head over to Google Analytics. Here, I have the acquisition reports of source and medium. And with the default GA functionality, you are able to see the last traffic source that was attributed to goals. Of course, if I had some data right here. But thanks to the initial traffic source, you’re also able to see what was the very first traffic acquisition source of those visitors. So you can do that by adding a secondary dimension and the initial, and here it is.

And here’s the data. Ignore the first line I was just playing around with that custom HTML tag. So this is the result. But as you can see, everywhere else, we see not only the last traffic source but the first one as well. So this might give you some new ideas and insights on how traffic sources are contributing to the success of the business. Now, another thing that you need to keep in mind is that this data will not appear in your GA reports right away. It is not available in real time reports, because real-time reports do not display custom dimensions. Also, this data will not appear pretty soon in your regular GA reports. For example, in my case, it takes up to several hours. But usually, I am ready to wait for up to 24 hours. So this is a really important thing to remember. So that’s it. Now we know how to track the initial traffic source of a visitor. This allows you to see the very first source from which the visitor landed on your page.

Now, before you start implementing the solution by yourself, you need to understand the caveats of this solution. First of all, it is based on cookies. So that means that if a user visits your website from another device, or the visitor just simply clears the cookies in the browser, the initial traffic source data will be lost. And when the visitor lands on the page, again, the initial traffic source will get some new value, which will probably be inaccurate. Another caveat is that if you are using cross-domain tracking, and if the visitor navigates from one website that belongs to you to another, there’s a chance that you will see the self-referral data. And unfortunately, this script does not support the referral exclusion list of your Google Analytics settings. That’s why you might see self-referrals in your Google Analytics reports. Additionally, if a person has visited your website some time ago before you implement this initial traffic source tracking solution, there’s a high chance that the value of the initial traffic source parameter will not be accurate, because the script cannot access the historical data of the visitor. However, if you want to go with a more robust solution, you should cooperate with a developer and ask that if the developer would push the initial traffic source data to the data layer. And then you would use that data in your Google Tag Manager container and push that further to Google Analytics or some other third party tools. So that’s it. I hope that you found this video useful. And if you have any questions, just post the question below the video or go to analyticsmania.com and contact me in person.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can track the initial source of where the user came from in Google Tag Manager first of all, and then forward this on to a custom dimension in Google Analytics. Now, I’d love to hear from you. How would you use that information when once you have it in Google Analytics? If you have already built this in what insights did it give you? Please share with us in the comments down below. Now big thanks to Julius from Analytics Mania. He has a great blog that you should check out at analyticsmania.com. And if you wanted to be on the channel because you want to share a cool tracking technique with us then please reach out to [email protected] and maybe we’ll see you soon enough on this channel. Now, as always, if you like this video, please give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to the channel right over there. Because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian. Til next time

SHOW MORE...

🔴 Connect your Cookie Consent Form with Google Analytics AllowAdFeature flag

GDPR has raised the question how we could enable and disable Advertising Features in Google Analytics via Google Tag Manager – Previously there was no good way of doing this programmatically, but in this Live Stream we want to take a look at the new feature of allowAdFeature flag in the Field to Set options to turn this on/off based a cookie consent

#GDPR
#GoogleTagManager
#GoogleAnalytics

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, I’m going to show you how you can connect your cookie consent form with the AllowAdFeatures from Google Analytics. All and more, coming up.

Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. And on this channel, we do marketing tech review, tutorials and the occasional live stream. So if you want to be here live, then consider subscribing and also click that bell notification so you will be notified once we go live. Now today, I want to talk about with you about the Allow advertising features in Google Analytics and how to connect it to your cookie consent form. We’ve done a video previously on GDPR compliance with Google Analytics. And that video, I basically showed you how to turn off all the different features of Google Analytics to become GDPR compliant. You only do the base tracking that Google Analytics actually allows you to do by default. And in this video, or I got a lot of questions on how to actually turn on the advertising features of Google Analytics. That’s the demographics reports, but also building remarketing audiences by a Google Analytics programmatically. So you’ll be able when somebody clicks on a cookie consent form and says, Yes, I accept to these terms that you will be sending out that data again to Google Analytics, to double click and to Adwords. Now, this was a bit tricky previously, because Google Analytics didn’t have a programmatic flag to actually say, Okay, I want to turn this on, I want to turn this off for this user. But now they have built in a new field that we can trigger with Google Tag Manager in order to connect the form to the actual advertising features. So without further ado, let’s dive into this training.

First of all, what are we talking about here? When we have the ability in Google Analytics apart from the website and clickstream tracking that we have set up with the Google Analytics js code to send our data to different other services. One of the services is double click, which gathers information and then feeds it back into Google Analytics through the demographics report. So you can get data like the rough estimates of the age of the users or their interest, agenda, for example, here as well. And this is a feature that you have to turn on. The other feature that you need to specifically turn on is when you have an audience here, you can always turn that audience into a remarketing audience. So you can build a remarketing audience that then sent this over to AdWords and you can remarket to users directly from Google Analytics. Now, these are not really third services since Google is one company. But it goes out of the scope of Google Analytics. So previously, you had to turn these features on in your tracking information, you have your data collection here. And here are two features, the remarketing features, and the advertising features that you had to turn on in order for this data to be gathered. That will turn something on in your tracking code, and then send that data over to these other services and remarket the user.

Now in GDPR terms, you might want to turn these features off, because the user has consented to actually being tracked through these other services and especially giving that data over to these other services. But it was all right if you actually informed the user about it, and got his explicit permission. And once you have the permission, you may want to turn these features on again. Unfortunately, that was not a programmatic way to do this in Google Analytics to say to Google Analytics, okay, now the user has consented, please now collect that data. But they have now introduced a new field in the analytics JS library that will allow us to turn these on programmatically. And this is the AllowAdFeatures. And it’s a line of code that you would need to programmatically put into your tracking code. Or you can deploy this via Google Tag Manager as well. So whenever somebody has consented to being tracked, you could deploy this tracking code and therefore be able to track this data in Google Analytics and build remarketing audiences. So today, I want to show you how you can actually accomplish this because there were some questions on how can I connect my cookie consent form to this AllowAdFeatures. Okay, first of all, you need to have a consent form. In the basic sense, a lot of people have like a little toaster plugin or something that pops up says, Okay, here’s my cookie policy. And here’s my cookies that I set. And do you agree to this? I have installed on this page, a very simple one that you can download from silktide.com. And it will give you the complete code that you can just pop into a custom HTML tag, that’s what I’ve done. And this will then on every page fire and pop up on your page. Now is this fully GDPR compliant? I don’t want to vouch for this, it is definitely a form of consent, where you have to click a button before something happens. The mechanism here is really that it just wants to once you click the button sets a cookie, and then you won’t be followed around anymore. But if the user doesn’t want to get this pop up anymore, he needs to say yes, to the cookie policy. And it will follow him around. I don’t know if this is best practice. And it’s according to the law. There might be other more sophisticated platforms out there. Nonetheless, the techniques that I want to show you right now about how you can actually connect that it to Google Analytics. So if you have a different cookie consent form, just use that and see how the cookie actually gets set. Now, once I click on this Got it button, a cookie be will be set in my browser. So it can open up the developer tools, which will find up here under more tools we have the developer tools. And then I can go to the application settings, up here is the tab applications and on the left side, we’ll find our cookies down here that are set on our website. Now we have some Google Analytics cookies, but also a new cookie called cookie consent dismissed and it has the value of Yes.

So if I reload this page now, we still have that cookie, it is safe on our browser, and we don’t see our cookie consent form anymore. Now, if I delete this cookie and reload the page, obviously, this cookie consent form will reappear. So here we have the cookie consent form. So it just checks whether it was agreed to or not. And then it will show it or not. For us, we can use that in our Google Analytics deployment. Now, again, if I click on Got it here, I can click on the refresh button for the cookies. And we should see here or cookie consent dismissed is now set to Yes. Now, how can I tell Google Analytics once the user has clicked on God it that he should deploy this advertising features? Well, in Google Analytics itself, you will need to first of all turn on these features. So they need to be toggled on. There’s also another way to do this in Google Tag Manager. But once you decide to turn this on, you can do that on the server side in Google Analytics directly. So you don’t have to mess with Google Tag Manager itself. By default now, all of these people who get tracked by Google Analytics will be also sent over that information. And that’s something we want to avoid. We want to only send it over when somebody has actually agreed to this. So we need to build something into the measurement side extra to this to allow this advertising features only for certain users. And let’s dive into Google Tag Manager. First of all, I have deployed here a Google Analytics page view tag pretty simple and I haven’t chosen to use the Google Analytics settings variable, you can definitely do that. And it sends us over to my account. And now we have here a field to set option. Now in this filed to set option, we can modify this to enter our AllowAdfeatures. Now, this is the name of the field and we can set it to a value, this value is either true or it’s false. Now, by default, the value is actually set to true. So the allow advertising features are sending over this data. And if we now wanted to change this programmatically based on the user input, we would obviously need to somehow have access to the cookie and then pull it into our Google Analytics field. For now, let’s save this and try this out on our page. First of all, just as field and see what the console says, we have, well, let’s go back into our Google Tag Manager and actually put Google Analytics or our Google Analytics tag in a certain mode. And that mode is under Advanced configurations we’ll set the use debug version to true. And that will give us some useful information into the console. We could also do this by the GA debugger extension, which I also have installed. But it’s nicer to do this on where people can actually try it out. And here, we see what data was actually sent over to Google Analytics. And we can see this tracker set AllowAdFeatures to true which is by default, anyway, set to true. So it doesn’t really make a difference. Now, the data would be sent over to Google Analytics to AdWords and to double click so we can get that information into Google Analytics. All right, now, we want to set this off from a perspective of the the user if the user hasn’t yet agreed to our cookie consent form. How would we do that? First of all, we would need to have access to our cookie right here. How can we get access with Google Tag Manager to our cookies? Well, there is a variable that’s built into Google Tag Manager, where we’ll just go to variables over here and click on a new variable. And as a type will choose the first party cookie. And that’s how you can get access to your cookies that are installed on your browser. And for us, we can just take our cookie name here. In our case, let’s go back and see this is the cookie name Cookie Consent dismissed. Let’s copy this and put that in here and click save. Well, I’m going to give this a name as well. So we know what it is. And set Refresh. Refresh our page. Let’s close this. And if you go to variables now, click on an event, we see that our cookie was set to Yes. So our Google Tag Manager now picks up the value of the cookie and it is set to Yes, and in this case, I want to send over the AllowAdFeatures. Now, one hurdle. The next hurdle we need to take is actually that our field our allow advertising features field only accepts values that are true or false. It’s a boolean value. So we can feed into this field the yes or no, we would actually intelligence furthers into a yes or into a true or false. How can we do that in Google Tag Manager? There is another functionality of a variable, which is the lookup table variable. And the lookup table variable basically takes an input and rewrites that into the output that you want. In our case, we can go to the a new variable, build a new lookup table variable, right here, lookup table, it’s what’s called. And here’s where we take our input variable. In our case, that would be our cookie, and whatever is inputted in that cookie. So if the input is yes, we want to actually turn us into true. If the input is oops deleted, true. If the input is no, we want to turn this into false, which is not really a value because we didn’t see that in our cookie, we can’t really set this value to know no. What would be the negative case here if the user hasn’t yet hasn’t yet agreed to our terms? So if we go back here, and just delete our cookie consent, or our cookie and reload the page. Now, in this case, the user hasn’t yet agreed to our cookie, right on our privacy policy. And therefore, we don’t want to send that data over. And what does our input actually say, in terms of the variables that we have in here, the cookie is undefined, it’s not yet set. And therefore, we could take that undefined value and translate it into false. So let’s go over here, undefined, and set that to false. Let’s rewrite this into a lookup table for our cookie consent. All right, let’s save this. And Refresh. Refresh our page. And now let’s look into our variable, we have our cookie consent dismiss is undefined. And therefore our lookup table variable will be set to false. What happens when we click on Got it? Well, first of all, nothing happens. Because we don’t have a new event in here. If we reload the page, now that the cookie was set, we should a new value in our variables the cookie is set to Yes. So our lookup table is set to true. So now we have rewritten the inputs here into true or false. And that’s something we can now use in our Google Analytics tag. So let’s go over to tags and go to GA page view, and then click on the field to set options here. And we’ll set our value not by default to true, but to a variable that we can access here. And this is our lookup table variable. So let’s save this, record refresh. And I’m gonna first of all, clear the cookie again for our test case. Now that’s cleared I’m going to reload the page and Google Analytics fires. Now, what data is actually sent over? We can see that in our developer console because we are still in this debug mode. And we see that our AllowAdFeatures was turned to false we haven’t yet agreed. In every consecutive pageview, if I go around the page without clicking on the gutter button here, I will not be sending that data over to double click and I won’t be setting a remarketing pixel. So that data for this user at least because it hasn’t agreed yet is not available in analytics will not go into our audience demographics reports and also not in our remarketing list. Now once the user has clicked on Got it, every consecutive page view, so if I go to the next page, or just reload the page, this will be set to true automatically. And as long as the cookie is sticking around. So if the user doesn’t go to another device, or doesn’t clear his cookies, or goes into a private browsing mode, we’ll see still be able to use that user or the data will still be sent over to our advertising features, such as a double-click, and Adwords. So it works as expected. And this is really how you can install this and connect your cookie consent form to this new AllowAdFeatures. Now in the end, first of all, let’s get rid of our debug version True. So it doesn’t always log this to the console. And the other thing that I need to tell you if you want to deploy this is obviously to use a Google Analytics settings variable, then you only have to configure this field to set option once in your Google Analytics settings variable. And if you have any other tags, such as event tags, this obviously also needs to be set. But with the Google Analytics settings variable, you only have to do it once in the variable itself, then reuse that variable inside of your Google Analytics tag. I didn’t do this year because we just have a one-page view tag and obviously, if you’re done with your tracking deployment, everything works as expected. Submit this as a version and give this always a name. And publish this to all your users so it goes live. All right, so there you have it. This is how you can build in your or connect your cookie consent form with the help of Google Tag Manager to the AllowAdFeatures in Google Analytics. Now, I’d love to hear from you. What precautions Have you taken when it comes to the GDPR? Do you have more complicated cookie consents form? How have you handled that previously? And if you haven’t yet, then why not consider subscribing right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian, the next time.

SHOW MORE...

How To Test Your Tracking Codes Before Installation

When customizing your JavaScript tracking codes you can run into all sorts of different problems. To avoid never ending back and forth with your developer you should test your codes beforehand. In this video we are going to use the JavaScript Console and Snippets to test our Tracking codes before implementation.

#Measure
#Tracking
#GoogleAnalytics

🔗 Links:

Chrome Developer Tools: https://developers.google.com/web/tools/chrome-devtools/
Snippets in Dev Tools: https://developers.google.com/web/tools/chrome-devtools/snippets

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, I’m going to show you how you can test your tracking codes before you actually implement them in Google Tag Manager onto your website or pass them on to a developer. All and more coming up.

Hey there, welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and today we’re here in our new studio. It’s still a work in progress, as you might hear, but nonetheless, I want to talk with you today about a little technique that I use to test my tracking before I actually implemented into Google Tag Manager or pass it on to a developer. Why is this important? Well, we have all been there, you go through the tracking steps, implement your tracking, and at some point it’s supposed to work but no data has received, there could be a multiple and a host of reasons why this is. But one might actually be that the tracking code that you are supposed to implement is malformed because you may have done some customization sort of tracking code, added some parameters, and suddenly, something is not working. Now to make sure that you’re tracking code is actually working correctly, I often test my tracking codes before I actually implement them into Google Tag Manager or pass them on to a developer that way, we don’t have these feedback loops of going back and forth, and later finding out well, the tracking code, the JavaScript code that we actually are supposed to implement was malformed. Now, Chrome gives us some great tools in order to accomplish this. And that’s what I want to show you today. So let’s dive in.

All right for this tip, we’re going to start out on our website where we want to test our tracking before we actually put it into Google Tag Manager hard coded onto our website, or send it on to a developer. You know these tracking codes that you get from Google Analytics, for example, here in our admin section, we have our tracking information, tracking code and here’s a little bit of JavaScript that you need to install on to the website. So how can we test the beforehand? Inside of our browser, we have access to JavaScript through our developer tools. And we can open them right here on the right side, we have more tools. And there is our developer tools, this will open up our developer tools. And he would get a panel that shows us the HTML markup representation, the document object model of the website that we are looking on right now. By the way, you might be seeing something like this, it’s just that you can’t change the site’s up here of where the panel is displayed. For our purposes, we want to first of all, look at the console, it was this is our direct access to JavaScript inside of the browser. So whatever we type here needs to be JavaScript confirm, and can be executed right away. So for example, an alert statement, press enter, and the JavaScript is right away executed, we get this alert statement from JavaScript, and therefore can use this to execute JavaScript inside of our browser. What if we wanted to execute this JavaScript? Well, it’s not actually just JavaScript here, because we have script tags, which are HTML. And then we have a little script blog right here, that is actual JavaScript. And first of all, what this script does, it loads this library from Google Tag Manager, let’s just copy this URL right here, and open up this new tab, it’s much more JavaScript, this is the complete library of the gtag. And let’s just mark this all and copy it into our browser here and paste it in. Let’s press enter, and it executes, nothing really happens. Because this is just a library. Now, we want to test our tracking. And this is down here inside of the script tags. Let’s copy that, go back to our page and read it as well, press enter, nothing happens again. But inside of our tech assistant, we see that there was a page view generated, we also should be to see this in our real time reporting that there was a page view that was just generated for this account. So here we go. So again, we can already test our tracking inside of the developer tools. Since now the library is loaded. And we have this configuration set up, what if we wanted to send an event into Google Analytics. Or let’s look up in the documentation of the gtag how to send events that’s right here, let’s copy this and try it out. Inside of our developer tools, we need to enter an action. So in our case, it would be test tag or test event,then we have a category and a label, I will omit this last value here.

And as you might notice, I’ve entered valid JavaScript with these quotation marks around my values, that the representation for string, I also got rid of that last comma here because we didn’t want to use the value, which also shows that this needs to be valid JavaScript. Otherwise, you would get an error and it wouldn’t be executed correctly. But again, if I would have the comma in here, press Enter. And that’s doesn’t do anything to the gtag. So correct, says automatically the library. But normally, it wouldn’t be valid JavaScript, and you would have an error in there. But again, you can test this all out beforehand. And now we would see up here that there has been an event fired, and that should also be visible again, inside our events right here. So here is where the event fight, right. So you can test already these codes inside of the console, as long as you provide it with pure JavaScript, so the browser can interpret it. But as you might have seen, it was a bit cumbersome to go through these lines here with my up and down arrow key. And if you make a mistake, you don’t have any way to go back and forth between your versions. So what I would recommend if you have larger code blocks, just like this one, to use another method, which is under sources tab. Now, in the sources tab, you normally look at our HTML, here is the representation it gets downloaded by the browser, different libraries, different platforms. But there’s also a little tab right here on the snippets, if you don’t see that you can probably activated in your settings where you can input complete blocks of code. So for example, I can go here with a new snippet. Lets call this Facebook pixel.

And he I can enter my JavaScript a little code editor right here. So let’s go over to Facebook. Right here we have our code. And this is a bit of HTML bit of JavaScript. Let’s just copy that and input that here. As you can see, we have our code editor, it already complains here about at this is not valid JavaScript. So let’s get rid of our script tags here and also the no script tag. And here we go. This is our Facebook pixel. Here’s the library that gets loaded. And then the initiation call and the track call for the page view. By the way, if you want to prettify something, you can format it here. So the format it and you make it a little bit more readable in terms of functions, for example, that are written out and so on, you can do that with any kind of code. And then if you want to execute it, so press enter, like on the console, you simply click down here, and it will run the code and open up in the window below here the console again, you can get rid of that by clicking the X you can get it back by pressing the Escape key. So this has execute now. And we see in our Facebook pixel helper that the page view was fired. But we actually want to try out a another track call. So let’s go to the second step here, which will let us add events. Let’s say we wanted to add a purchase, we enter a conversion value five and the currency euro and we get our code. Let’s copy this to the clipboard and also paste it underneath here.

Now again, they are script tags in there to delete them. And let’s execute this. We get our message down here that something happened. And in our Facebook pixel helper, we also see that a purchase was now sent over to Facebook. So these are tools the console and the snippets are really great for trying out tracking codes before you implement them by Google Tag Manager, hardcode them or send them on to your developer. By the way, the snippets can be saved. Now this is an unsaved one. But if I press my command or control key S we see that this is now saved. And if I close and open up the browser, again, this will still be here it will be saved with the settings of the browser. So it’s really a great alternative if you don’t have a more powerful text so editor available such as VS code or Sublime Text to edit your JavaScript.

Alright, so there you have it. This is how you can test your tracking before you actually implemented it into Google Tag Manager or pass it on to a developer. If you have other techniques that save you time. This saves me so much time and I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. And if you haven’t yet, then maybe consider subscribing right over there. Because we’re bringing you new videos just like this one every week. Now. My name is Julian. Till next time.

SHOW MORE...

Google Analytics Audit – Our Process for Optimal Data Quality

Google Analytics Audits is the very first thing we do to assess our clients analytics standing and understand their business better. In this video, I will share with you the 5 Google Analytics Audit Steps we do here at Measureschool.

1. Questions & Communication
2. Technical Audit
3. Prioritize
4. Suggestion and Recommendation
5. Reporting

#GoogleAnalyticsAudit
#GoogleAnalyticsAudit
#GoogleAnalyticsChecklist

🔗 Links:

Google Analytics Checklist https://measureschool.com/checklist
Data Quality Score (by Brian Clifton): https://brianclifton.com/example-audit.pdf
Successful Analytics Book https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books/227061-successful-analytics

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

So you want to put your Google Analytics skills to use? Well then in this video I’m gonna show you our process how we do Google Analytics Audits. All the more coming up. Hey there welcome back to another video of Measureschool.com. Teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and today we want to talk about Google Analytics Audits.

Now if you want to put your Google Analytics implementation skills to use, you’re pretty advanced maybe already, and are working as a freelancer and want to start working with clients, where do you actually start? Well, most of the time we start with an audit in our practice of our services because we need to determine what data is already there, how is this data gathered, is this data of high quality, and is it worth going into the data maybe changing something around, tracking more for the client making his implementation more useful, and then also analyzing giving him insights, and the change that he wants. But it really starts for us with this crucial Google Analytics audit in order to determine the state of their analytics. So in this video, I’m gonna show you our process on how we do Google Analytics Audits here at Measureschool. Let’s dive in.

All right the first step is like any analytics project out there is starts with good questions. First of all, you should talk to your clients and figure out what that Google Analytics implementation is all about. How do they use Google Analytics? What kind of type of company is this? How does their business model maybe relate to Google Analytics and what you can track on their website? And crucially what do they want to get out of Google Analytics? Maybe again they’re already set expectation what Google Analytics can do and what it can’t do, and we’re an audit would be helpful. Now you can already do this in your selling portion of the audit or maybe you have that information already available. But an audit is only as effective as you have communicated it to the client and you have gotten the right input to look for the right things in the right lens so to say when you go through the Google Analytics account and determine the data quality. This already will give us valuable hints on how Google Analytics can be implemented on the client’s website and on features that he might be missing out on and how we can proceed after we have done the audit? So definitely you’ll have a long conversation with your client for the audit.

The second step is the Technical Audit portion. Now, this is really where you put your Google Analytics skills to use. You probably have a checklist of different Google Analytics features to check for and make sure that everything is working correctly. We have a list here at Measureschool that you can download. I will link that up down below. But this is really where all your skills come inspiration. You need to be a little bit advanced to understand how the data is actually flowing into the account, how you can make sure that the quality is correct, and maybe also dig into their data to find any anomalies so you can investigate them in their tracking system. Not all of the checkpoints will be relevant to the business that you are looking at. So maybe they don’t need cross-domain tracking because it’s just one website with one URL.  And there are other features that might be more important like UTM parameters and so on. It’s really a useful tool to have your own checklist if you want to go through and make sure that everything is tracked correctly and configured correctly. This will also give you a great documentation for later and a grand overview of how the state is of their Google Analytics account.

 

Then in the third step, you want to Prioritize. Now Google Analytics implementation is not one-size-fits-all. So not all the features will be relevant for the business that you are looking at. There might be a Content business or an eCommerce business completely different feature sets that need to be implemented and prioritized. So how would you do such a prioritization? Now I’m a big fan of Brian Clifton’s approach where he scores the data quality in a report. You can find a template on his website. I’m gonna link that up down below.  And it’s also in the great book, Successful Analytics. But what he does in this report is actually looks at the broader areas of your Google Analytics account and scores them and weights them in accordance to his framework. And that will happen later determine an overall Google Analytics data quality score that will tell him in which percentile clients’ Google Analytics account is in. Then he can determine for example if they are under 50%. And it doesn’t really make sense to start with serious analytics with that data that they have in the account. But rather should work on certain given areas in order to get over that 50% and be able to do serious analysis with that data.

Now once you have prioritized you want to come up with a treatment. You want to suggest or bring up recommendations. So it’s not only enough to just go through the points and say this is not working, this is not implemented. But rather going back to these crucial prioritized points and making suggestions on how to fix them. There might be something easy like fixing the tracking code which would be pretty high on the list if this is not working. Or other things like event tracking that is important particularly for this business and website. Now coming up with these recommendations is a crucial point of the audit portion because you want to bring your clients results. And they shouldn’t just be left with a checklist that determines if something is working or not. But really giving them recommendations what are the next steps, how can you go from maybe and beginner analytics level to an advanced analytics level, and up your game in the data quality department. So definitely come up with some suggestions and some recommendations for fixes in their Google Analytics account or for better tracking in general.

Last but not least, you want to report that data. Now, this can be in different forms and shapes. Some people write a big report where they have treatments and suggestions in there as a word document or PDF that they can also show to the management and be passed around in different departments inside of the company. It could also come in a form of a simple checklist with the recommendations in a sheet. Or you are actually presenting that data and lobbying for the change that you want to see in the company. So this report is really a final delivery to end the project and have a clear cutoff point for your findings and also suggestions. But it’s also a great starting point for further engagements. So if you actually implement these changes or come up with these treatments who would be better suited to implementing them than you.

All right these are the steps that we normally take when we do analytics audits. If you’re interested in getting an audit from us then I have a services link down below. And if you have already done analytics audits for clients then I’d love to hear from you as well if you have any suggestions down below in the comments. Now my name is Julian, till next time.

 

SHOW MORE...

GDPR and Google Analytics – What do you need to change?

GDPR is coming to all of us. How can we get our Google Analytics ready for the privacy changes? There are a few things you need to take care of to be compliant. In this video we are going to have a look at those changes.

1. Avoid PII in GA
2. Anonymize IP
3. Disable Display Features
4. GA Cookies

#GDPR
#GoogleAnalytics
#Privacy

🔗 Links:

GDPR – What you need to know https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nA9NgrvS8vg

GDPR Compliance – The steps that I take to prepare https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khr6sctQjRM

Tools & Widgets to Manage Cookie Consent: https://medium.com/gdprstories/tools-widgets-to-manage-cookie-consent-346a00dc1dff

Discussion about GDPR and GA: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+StephaneHamel-immeria/posts/YcnrmoQQpT4

GDPR Review service: https://www.disclaimertemplate.com/julian/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

– In this video we’re gonna take a look at what you need to change inside of your Google Analytics installation to become compliant with GDPR. All and more coming up. Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and today we want to talk about GDPR again.

Now, in our last videos we already talked about what GDPR actually is, and how I prepared for GDPR, and how you could too. Today we want to talk about a specific tool, in this case Google Analytics, so how can you prepare your Google Analytics account to be compliant with GDPR and privacy laws in Europe. Google Analytics is obviously a tracking tool and it’s gathering data from data subjects, such as people who come to your website from the EU, and that’s why you need to protect their privacy. Google Analytics has come out with certain features, even before the GDPR was actually announced, to protect users’ privacy. In today’s video we want to go through the steps that you need to take in order to get your Google Analytics implementation ready for GDPR. It’s important to remember that there’re actual levels of compliance so you could, for example, turn off Google Analytics completely, then you definitely would not gather any data obviously, but you wouldn’t be able to analyze your user behavior on your website anymore. You could take these steps that I will show you in this video, or leave them out completely and ignore GDPR, which I wouldn’t recommend.

Now, there are steps that you need to take that could impact your data quality. You can mitigate this data quality loss a little bit, but in a sense, if you want to become fully GDPR-compliant, then you need to put these provisions in place. So let’s take a look at these steps. Here we are in our Google Analytics account and we want to get it GDPR ready. The first thing that we want to check is there any personal identifiable information that goes already into this account. This has been a big no-go in terms of service of Google Analytics anyways, and so you want to make sure that you are not inadvertently tracking any personal identifiable information. That might be an email address, first name, and so on. This can happen, for example, if your email tool sends your user to your website with a query string here and the email address is in the query string. Obviously Google Analytics is gonna send over a pageview to the system, and also is gonna send that information of the URL to the system right here. And then it would be saved in the account and you would be tracking personal identifiable information in Google Analytics. So, if you want to spot-check this, you can go into your behavior reports here, and to Site Content, and look in the search bar if there’s any email address with the @ symbol, for example. And if you see anything in your URLs, you could also put in first name, or any other identifiers that you can think of. So the URLs and the page paths seem to be clear. You are also not allowed to send this in as custom dimensions so check your custom dimensions as well. If you have any personal identifiable information that you are sending over to the system. If you find that you are sending data over, you might already be at risk for violating the terms of service of Google Analytics so you might as well start with a new account. But for sure put in filters in place on the management site, so on Google Tag Manager site, where you are filtering out that information before it goes on to Google Analytics so this doesn’t happen again.

All right, let’s go through some concrete steps that we need to take in order to get GDPR-compliant, first step being implementing the Anonymize IP feature. Well, Anonymize IP feature takes out the last numbers of the IP address, and analytics would only use the first digits to actually store and process in that dataset. That might lead to a slight decrease of accuracy in terms of the geolocation that Google Analytics does, but since this is considered personal identifiable information under new GDPR regulations, you need to implement this for the protection of European citizens. So how can your implement this feature? It depends on how you have installed Google Analytics. You need to do this on the tracking site, so on the actual tracking code. In Google Tag Manager you can go into your Google Analytics Pageview tag, or in your Google Analytics Settings variable, and under the More Settings, you’ll be able to implement a Field to Set option, and here is the option Anonymize IP that you will set to true, and that will anonymize your IP in the future. So, just to try this out, let’s save this, refresh our Preview and Debug Mode, go back to our page, let’s refresh that. Let’s actually take our PII out. And our Pageview tag fires now. I have a plugin here called the GA Debugger that you can install, and it will give you some information in your developer tools that you can open up under View, Developer, and then here Developer Tools. Go straight to JavaScript Console, which I have open here, and there you can see what information will send over to Google Analytics, and here we can see that there was an anonymizeIp equals true sent over so the IP address will be masked automatically by Google Analytics. This is a feature that you need to turn on all your pageview and other hits that go out to Google Analytics. If you’re not working with Google Tag Manager, you might be doing this in your analytics.js. For this example you would need to implement the ga set option anonymizeIp to true. Or if you’re using the new Global Site Tag, you need to add to your configurations of your Universal Analytics code the object here with anonymizeIp true so it will be configured in that way. Once you have that turned on, you can go to the next step, which is disable advertising features.

If you are familiar with display advertising features, it’s a feature set within Google Analytics that you can turn on, that gives you, first of all, the ability to build remarketing audiences from your custom segments, and also gives you some pretty interesting data about the users coming to your websites. This is data that is actually derived from different sources and therefore is classified as third-party data, which you also don’t want to connect to your Google Analytics account. So it’s safer to turn this feature completely off. How do you do this? Well, if you have it enabled on the server side, then that means in your Admin section, if you go to the Tracking Info here, then you will see Data Collection. And under these data collections, you see the Remarketing on, and the Advertising Reporting Features on. These need to be turned off.

Now, I don’t have edit rights to this account, but that might be possible in one of my demo accounts here. So you would turn these off, save this advertising feature and you will be safe for GDPR purposes. It might be that you have an older installation, before Google Analytics actually allowed you to turn this on in the Admin section, where you had an analytics.js code where you added this little line to require these display advertising features. Obviously you want to then delete this line so it doesn’t get tracked specifically in your analytics.js codes, or in the gtag you can add this allow display features false, and we would just add this to the object in our configuration file, with a comma, so you are not sending this display feature information onto Google Analytics anymore. And obviously, if you had that implemented in your Google Tag Manager account, you might find this under the More Settings, under Advertising, that this was set to True.

Now, you can set this to No value set or explicitly False at this point. Once you have saved this, we have now taken care of the display advertising features. Last but not least, we have to talk about the Google Analytics cookie. A cookie gets set when you have Google Analytics installed with a pseudonymous ID that gets stored in this cookie, it’s the client ID. GDPR is not super clear on all the requirements we need to take in order to become GDPR compliant in terms of cookies. There has been a lot of talk around this but there’s not yet a real consensus on what needs to be done. If you want to be on the safe side, you might want to install a cookie consent form that actually manages and makes sure that you don’t get tracked when the user doesn’t explicitly consent to this tracking. That would mean you would have a popup where there’s a button and the user actually can read about Google Analytics and then also consent to the data being sent to Google Analytics. As you might have seen in my last video, I’m holding off on what the best practice here is. I want to give you some pointers if you want to install this. There’s a great blog post by Vicky on tools and widgets to manage cookie consent, different solutions out there. I wouldn’t say that I have found the one that I really like yet, but this is a great overview on what kind of providers are out there, and how they are displaying their consent forms. The important part would be that the user actually consents to you sending that data, only then you can send over the hits to Google Analytics or other tools. That would require another set of rules, triggers in your Google Tag Manager, or in your implementation of analytics before this data actually gets sent. So you can’t just install the Google Analytics code on your website anymore. You would need to actually have some kind of opt-in gate that lets the user choose if the information should be sent to Google Analytics. So if you want to install one of these tools, then I’d refer you to look up how this would be done for your situation. Before I leave you to implement these changes in your analytics account, I also want to mention that Google has released a new version of the processing terms that you can send into Google and they will make a processing agreement with you. They’ve also launched a new feature which entails data retention, so you can change when your data should expire. And they will come out with a specific tool to delete data within your Google Analytics account. That hasn’t been released yet as of recording of this video. At the end I also want to mention that this is maybe a pretty extreme step for you because you will lose data in your account. You will be missing out on that great demographics information. So how could you mitigate the damages that this makes to your data quality? Well, you could take these measures that we just went through only for European citizens. So if you have a broad user base all over the world, you may only want to take these steps for European citizens. It is possible to install these features based on the location of the user. For that you will need a geolocation API that actually detects where the user is from at the point of him being on your website, and then enabling showing the cookie consent form, anonymizing his IP, and so on. Again, this would add another technical layer to your analytics setup. There is a API here, for example from geoPlugin, that lets you look up where the user is currently located. This is not something that Google Tag Manager actually provides, it’s not part of JavaScript by default, so you can’t look it up through Tag Manager just through a variable, for example. You will need a third party, such as this geoPlugin API, to locate the user. If you want to do that, then I will link up some resources down below. A great discussion I read on the Google Tag Manager forum on how to do that.

All right, today you have, these are the points that you need to take care of in your Google Analytics account. Again, there are levels of compliance so you could get some data back or mitigate the data quality loss by putting something into place, like geolocation where you only activate certain features for certain users who come from the European Union. But obviously this takes a lot more implementation than we have done today. It’s probable that there will be more changes to come in Google Analytics and to privacy laws, it’s always a work in progress so we will see how the best practices and the lawsuits will inform us. If there’s anything new, then I will inform you on this channel so make sure to subscribe. And also, if you want to find out more about GDPR, we have done several videos on this as well, one of them up there. My name is Julian. Till next time.

SHOW MORE...

My favorite Google Analytics report

Is there too much data in your GA account? At first Google Analytics can get quite overwhelming when trying to find insights. My work always starts at the same place….

In this video, I present to you my favorite Google Analytics report of all time and why I think this is the best starting point for my analysis.

🔗 Links:

UTM Parameters for Source Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNOsldDS_pY
Google Analytics Demo Account: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/6367342?hl=en
Our Google Analytics Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL61v47WyHs&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHfqMHMa_1VmCagYGSxyOeK

#GoogleAnalyticsReport
#GoogleAnalytics
#Measure

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

There are probably over 50 reports in Google Analytics. Which one should you be using? In this video, I’m gonna show you my favorite report in Google Analytics and why I chose this one over the others. Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My names is Julian and today we wanna talk about my favorite Google Analytics report of all times.

Now, Google Analytics implementations, it’s actually pretty custom to what your functionality is in a business and what report you should be looking at. In the end, Google Analytics is really just a question answering machine where you ask the question and you look in the right report and then try to find the answer through the tools that are available and the visualizations that have available but I wanted to show you what my favorite report in Google Analytics is and maybe you have guessed it already or maybe you’re using that report as well and I’d love to hear from you later on down below in the comments if that is the same report that you were thinking about or if you have another special report that you look on often. So, without further ado, let’s dive into my favorite report. All right, so welcome to my favorite report. This is the Source Medium report. You can find it under the Acquisition and the Source Medium.

Now, why’s this my favorite report? It’s actually a report that I would choose to look at if there would be no other reports in Google Analytics. This is the most valuable part of it all at least for a first analysis and it’s really about being an online marketer and caring about where my users come from and this is the question that this report answers quite well and even goes a step further telling me how it’s performing and some instances how I can improve it. Now, first up, what is Source Medium? Source Medium is a classification of Google Analytics determining where your users came from, when they entered your website. As opposed to the other reporting that we have about channels, source medium is really the raw data point that comes in that you can influence through UTM parameters. If you don’t know what UTM parameters are, then I’d urge you to check out the video I’m gonna link up in the description below or you see it up here in the card as well. So, every time a user enters your website, starts a new session, he gets sorted into one of these rows here that tell us where the user came from. We can quickly analyze the most important traffic sources for us, so in this case, the organic source results of Google, any other important referrals, how well paid advertising is doing, Google CPC, for example, and also the traffic that Google couldn’t classify. I always call this dead traffic. It doesn’t really hold any insights because we don’t know where this traffic actually came from. So, my inclination’s always to try to decrease that amount and actually send in traffic with UTM parameters attached.

Now, in these metric fields, we get a great overview of what happens to the traffic once it enters our website. We have this model of ABC analysis. That’s Acquisition, Behavior and Conversions. You might be familiar with these terms from the big reportings up here, Acquisition, Behavior, Conversions. These really are digging deeper into these aspects of our analysis and these really answer the question where does our traffic come from, what do they do on our website, and do they reach our goal of our website? Now, down here everything is broken down by these different source mediums and we can see line by line how these stack up against each other. This is quite great because we can quickly compare different sources against each other. For instance, Google is bringing us most of the traffic but the e-commerce conversion is much lower as opposed to this referral source, much lower traffic but the conversion is much higher. Maybe you should be working on increasing this traffic source here as it has a much higher chance to convert. If you don’t see any data in your e-commerce reports it might be that you have goals installed but if you see no data at all, then it means you don’t have goals installed and this is something that you definitely should do. We have some videos on this channel as well on how to set up goals in Google Analytics. Back to the e-commerce reports, let’s have a another look at the different metrics that we see right where. So, for example, in the Google CPC column, we can analyze how effective our traffic is that comes from our paid advertising on Google.com. We get a decent amount of traffic and that traffic bounces to 57%. What does that mean? Well, 57% of the users that actually enter the website through the source Google CPC only have one page view in that session which gives us an idea how relevant the actual landing page is in connection to the actual ad, so what does the user expect once he clicks on an ad? To come to a website where he can find a product, for example, if he doesn’t find that, he will bounce.

So, overall, you will try to decrease this bounce rate and help the user at least to go to the next page and interact with your page further but this only happens if your ad is really relevant to the user and he finds on the next page when he clicks through that there’s a relevant product that he wants to buy. Well, once the user is on the page, he clicks through and on average looks at 3.61 pages in that session and stays for an amount of one minute 52 seconds. Again, these numbers don’t mean anything by their own. You would need to compare them against your other traffic sources and see where you might need improve a traffic source if that’s in the realm of your marketing efforts and then we see how many people of those people who entered the website and clicked through actually converted and how much revenue they have generated. Now, revenue is also a great indicator if you are responsible for these AdWords ads, you probably know how much you’ve spent on the account in a given period and therefore can do a quick IOR analysis and see if this is still a profitable campaign for you.

So, really quick insights through this report just through asking these questions, where does my user comes from? What does he do on the website? And did he convert and reach my goal? Now, obviously we can go deeper into some of these traffic sources like Google CPC but that’s really what these other reports are all about. You have your AdWords reports, your Search Console reports if you wanna dig deeper into the organic aspect of your traffic and referral reports which help you to analyze these different source mediums under the aspect that is important when comparing referrals to each other or social sources to each other. And once you have a broad overview of what data you wanna dig into, you will have more questions and this is what Google Analytics is all about to actually start investigating, start analyzing, using the tools like the Custom Segment Builder up here or different visualization methods to understand your user behavior whether answering those questions that you have asked and getting to a conclusion, a recommendation or an actual action that you take in your marketing account, for example, to influence these different metrics. But the starting point for most of my analysis is really this Source Medium report that lets me start forming the first hypothesis, the first questions that I want to investigate further and that’s why I think that this is the most valuable report within Google Analytics. All right, so there you have it. This is my favorite report in Google Analytics. I might be biased because I’m first and foremost still a marketer and I want to control where my traffic’s coming form and how it’s performing so I can optimize, and bring more qualified traffic to the website that I’m using. Now, this said, I actually dig deeper into different other reports because this is first my starting point. It’s my favorite report because I get questions from it. I see something in the report that is interesting and then I try to find out or I get a new question and I try to find out in different other reports why that is so and maybe I will go deeper into the AdWords or the SEO section of Google Analytics to find out more about how I can optimize this given channel. Now, that said, if you are a PPC guy or an SEO guy or you are an e-commerce manager, or you are a developer of the website, you might be looking at totally different reports and this is totally find as well. This is just my personal preference and I’d love to hear from you what you find so interesting in the reports that you look at most often. Please leave a comment down below and let others know about your experience with your favorite report. Now, if you haven’t yet, then consider subscribing right over there ’cause we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian, ‘Til next time.

SHOW MORE...

Short Google Analytics 2018 Tutorial for Beginners

Why should you be using Google Analytics on your website? Google Analytics is a powerful web tracking tool that provides real time reports and insights about the traffic and general behavior of users in a website. In this video, I will show you the Core reports in Google Analytics to give you ideas on the appropriate optimization to focus on.

🔗 Links:
[Playlist] Google Analytics for Beginners series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL61v47WyHs&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHfqMHMa_1VmCagYGSxyOeK

#GoogleAnalytics
#GoogleAnalyticsTutorial
#Measure

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video I’m gonna give you a quick introduction into Google Analytics, and why you should be using it on your website. A little more, coming up. Hey there and welcome back to another video of Measureschool.com. Teaching you the data driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and on this channel we do marketing tech reviews, tips and trick videos, and tutorials just like this one. So, if you haven’t yet consider subscribing, and also click that bell notification icon, so you stay up to date with what we do here on this channel. Now today I wanna give you a quick introduction into Google Analytics. Now I condense it down to really show you the Core Reports and why you should be using this tool on your website, to get more insights about the traffic, and what is generally happening on your website, so you can optimize accordingly. So, let’s dive in.

Alright, so here we are inside of Google Analytics. Now this might be a little bit of confusing to you with all these numbers, but bear with me, we’re gonna break it down in the most important reports that you want to look at. First up, before you get started, make sure your Google Analytics is set up correctly. You need to have the tracking code installed, that you get at the beginning, when you installed Google Analytics. So, if you go back here in the admin section, you can look at our tracking code that we need to install on our page, and then also install goals. If you wanna find out more about how to install goals, you have some tutorials on this channel as well. Once you have that set up, you are all good to go. If your account has been running for a while, you will see data here in this home screen. Now this is the Google Analytics demo account, so if you wanna get access to that, I’m gonna link this up in the description below. So inside of Google Analytics, what can we do here actually? You see a lot of numbers, but all you need to care about, is your questions that you have for this tool.

Google Analytics measures your data, reports on it, and then helps you to analyze it. So all you need to have is a good question. Google Analytics itself, gives you already, some good questions on the home screen. So where do your users visit? How do you acquire users? And so on. So you can just look at these different reports here, and already get a lot of insights on the behavior of your users that visit your website. On the left side here, we have different report tabs that actually go deeper into these reports, and we can get a lot of insight if we know what we are asking for. So, what do you I usually look for when I go through these reports? Let me give you some examples. For example, here in the Real-time reporting, we can get an overview, what is happening on our side right now. The users that are on our side, how many there are, and the active pages that they are looking at, really help for when it comes to starting a new marketing campaign, and you want to know if this is effective, if users are flowing in, where they’re coming from, what they’re doing right now, and if the tracking that you have set up is working correctly. Next up, let’s take a look at an Audience report.

Now an Audience report, as the name already implies, is all about the users who visit your website. We can have a look where they’re coming from. So, let’s go over here to the Geo report, and if I wanted to decide where I should focus my marketing efforts, for example. In this chart I will see that most of the users come from the United States, and therefore my money would probably be well spent, as I’ve already have an audience in the United States. But you can have a look at all the different countries that your users come from. The host of other reports here, about the technology that users are using, the browser for example, and demographic state as well, but this is really something that I use on a ad-hoc basis when it comes to, as I’m trying to figure out who I should target in my advertising, for example. Then we get to the Acquisition report, and the Acquisition reports are all about where does your users actually come from, and the report that I normally look at is the Source/Medium report. Why do I look at the Source/Medium report? It’s one of my favorite reports because I know how the Source/Mediums are put together. If you wanna find out more about this then check out our video on UTM parameters. That lets you control how you send the data into these reports. Here it can get the most important data about how my marketing campaigns are performing. So on this account there is a lot of YouTube referral traffic. We can see how many people come in a given period.

Now if you wanna change the period, up here we have the date picker, that we could change around and, let’s look at the last month here. We also see the Bounce Rates. So how do users behave on our website once they come to the website, and a Bounce Rate simply states how many people, just look at one page, and then leave already. So, that way we can determine the effectiveness of our marketing campaign, how deep people go into our website after they enter, and how long they stay. And that gives us a good comparison to the different traffic sources, and which might be more effective in terms of engaging users on our website. Then if you have Goals set up, you’d be able to see how many people actually convert. And this is super powerful because we get a conversion rate per channel, and if you can compare that against other channels, we can see for example, this deals site at Googleplex, is providing us really high quality traffic that converts really well and makes us lot of money. This is all built in with Ecommerce Tracking, if you have goals you will be able to also choose them right here. So, the Source/Medium report is really a great example of a Google Analytics report that I look up very often. Moving on, once the users are quiet and have found their way onto our platform, we wanna know what they do. And this is where the Behavior reports come in. The Behavior reports will tell you all about the pages that are visited on your website. So here we have a great overview on the different pages that are visited most frequently, how many people have viewed this page, how long they stayed on a page, and what they have done afterwards. If they have exited a page, or clicked on to another page. We can also see the value of that page, if we have Ecommerce Tracking installed.

So how many people have actually visited this page prior to their purchase. That lets me identify pages that actually help me to convert people better. So this page right here, is super valuable for us, and maybe I should spend more time optimizing that. Although just three people have viewed this page, so might now be that relevant after all. Better take a page like, the your info page, that has a lot of traffic, makes us money, and therefore should be worth another look at making sure this page is optimized correctly. Now one other question is how do people actually flow through our website from page to page. We have this Behavior Flow report here that lets us see just that. So right here you can choose your pages and events, and this gives us a nice overview where users start their journey, and leave through the website, to get to their page where they exit a website. So, also great report to see how people flow through our website. And then last, but not least, we have Conversion reports, and Conversions reports are all about these goals that you have implemented in your Google Analytics account. It will let you know that the user actually complete the action, or visited the page that I wanted him to visit. So that might be a auto-confirmation page, like here, or a form completion page, or maybe a block post, that he or she, should of read. Once you have implemented goals, you will be able to see if that user reached that goal, within your website.

If you have an Ecommerce side running, and you have Ecommerce Tracking installed, you’ll have many more reports available that let you analyze how people flow through your page, and if they bought products from you, and which products in particular, which how much money these products have made, and so on. So Ecommerce Tracking is really something you should install if you have a Ecommerce website running. With that short overview, I leave you with the homepage screen and I encourage you to click around in these reports and find out more about how your users behave on your website.

So there you have it these are the Core Reports of Google Analytics and why you should be using it on your website. It’s really an awesome tool, and if you get more into it, you an get more out of it as well. So if you’re ready to dive into Google Analytics we have a beginners playlist right here on this channel, that gives you much more information on how to install Google Analytics correctly, how to analyze the data that you get from it, and then optimize your website accordingly. So if you wanna dive into that, click on the video card right there. And if you haven’t yet, and please also, subscribe to our channel because we’ll bring you new videos, just like this one, every week. Now my name is Julian, see you in the next one.

SHOW MORE...

Google Tag Manager Button Click Tracking (2018 version) for Google Analytics, Facebook and AdWords

Tracking Button Clicks used to take serious technical chops to pull off. If you have Google Tag Manager installed you simply need to follow a few steps and will be able to send Events to Google Analytics, Facebook and AdWords. In this video you are going to learn the 4 steps you need to follow to setup your Events correctly with Google Tag Manager

The Steps are:
1. Setup a generic Click Trigger
2. Perform the Click to see what GTM picks up
3. Inspect the variables and refine your Trigger
4. Connect your Trigger to a Tag (such as Google Analytics,
Facebook, AdWords and more….)

#ButtonClickTracking
#GoogleAnalytics
#GoogleTagManager

🔗 Links from the video:

GTM Event-Tracking Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b48PbFCNyOM&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHqk0w9OU2IypiZsH2qqdoS&index=1&t=0s
GTM for Beginners series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCmdRivjvRk&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZEY-rBGG99Y9V10Dc7g7cHt

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

In this video I’m going to show you how you can track button clicks with the help of Google Tag Manager and send an event into Google Analytics, to Facebook, or to AdWords. All and more coming up right after this.

Hey there and welcome back to another video of MeasureSchool.com teaching you the data driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and on this channel we do marketing tech reviews, tips and tricks videos, and tutorials just like this one, so if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing to our channel and also click that notification icon so you stay up to date with what we do every week.

Now today we want to an update video on a very popular video that we did a while back here on this channel, which is about button click tracking with Google Tag Manager. Now once you watch this video you will understand how auto event tracking works with Google Tag Manager and then be able to send an event to Google Analytics, to Facebook Analytics, or even AdWords. So let’s dive in to today’s video.

But before we get started we need to actually learn a little bit of theory on how auto event triggers work within Google Tag Manager. So if you want to install event tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager, you need to be aware that Google Tag Manager can deploy an auto event trigger. And this trigger actually has two functionalities. One is the listener functionality, and the second one is the filter functionality. These combined determine whether a tag like an event tag is deployed and transfers information to Google Analytics. Let’s make this a little clearer. So let’s say you have a website where you have Google Tag Manager installed. And you deploy an auto event trigger, in this case a click trigger.

Now this click trigger will first of all listen to any kind of clicks that happen on the different elements and every time somebody clicks on any of the elements on your website, it will forward an event into the trigger and then the filter functionality will determine whether this event is the right event and then based on that turn true or false and in turn trigger your tag that transfers information to Google Analytics, could also be Facebook Analytics or AdWords. So again there are two functionalities, one is the listener functionality, and one is the filter functionality. And therefore we need to go through steps in order to ensure that both of those functionalities actually work. So in order to build effective event tracking with Google Tag Manager, we need to go through these steps.

First is to build a generic click trigger and then try out to trigger the event. If this can be listened to and we can actually pick up the right event, we can refine our trigger, turn our generic click trigger into a specific one only for our element that we actually want to track, and then connect this all to a tag. So let’s go through these steps. Back in our Demoshop we have here a website where we have Google Tag Manager installed.

Now if you don’t have Google Tag Manager installed then you can follow along this video, it will help you to do just that. And we have Google Tag Manager installed here, if we want to make sure that this is actually installed we can always look in our tag assistant for Google Chrome or go into our Google Tag Manager and actually click on the preview in debug mode which will put our browser and only our browser into a special state, which will give us the ability on our website to see what’s going on with Google Tag Manager by just reloading it and we see this little console pop up down here which will get really important in a second. Now the first step that we want to go through is to actually build a generic click trigger. For that we’ll go over to Google Tag Manager, click on the triggers, and then click on new right here. Then we give this all a name and click on the trigger configurations. Here we can choose our trigger type, what kind of event do we want to listen to. In our case it would be a click trigger and we’ll go with the all elements. You can also use just links, but to keep it more general I will go with the all elements trigger. Now here we don’t have to do anything anymore.

We want to listen to all clicks because it’s a generic click trigger and just see whether this works for our element. We’re going to save this and before we continue, you need to go under variables here. And actually go to the built-in variable tab and go to configure and make sure under the click section here you have these click triggers actually enabled. You only have to do this once. Once they’re enabled you can use them. Now up here in our preview and debug mode we can go to refresh, you can also click that preview button one more time. And this will refresh our Google Tag Manager in the background. And once we reload the page we should have now the listener functionality installed on our page. Now Google Tag Manager should be able to listen to any kind of click that we do on our website. So for example, I can click it here, click up here, I’m gonna do this with command key press so it opens up in a new tab. Gonna click here, and obviously also on our add to cart click to see whether something moves down here and Google Tag Manager is actually able to pick this up. So I’m gonna click on this add to cart button and I don’t want to be redirected to the next page so I’m gonna do this with the command key pressed. I’m gonna go back here and we can see all these different events.

Now what we want to do is actually go to the second tab called variables here and then go through our events that were transferred to Google Tag Manager. So for example here’s the fourth event, and I’m gonna click on it, we have hit variables, and we can see all the click variables that we have just enabled and can see how they get filled. Now every time you click on a different element, these variables get filled differently. So if you go to this fifth click we can see that things are changing inside of this variable menu. Now if you remember I first clicked on this title here and it had the click text Happy Ninja. We can go to the next one and I clicked on apparently something that’s singles that was right here and this was transferred as the click text. Now you also notice that there are other variables that get filled differently. For example, the click element which is a URL. We see maybe the click URL, this is where we are redirected to. And sometimes we also see click classes or an ID, so if your element in the background of the HTML has classes or an ID, it would be perfect because our trigger actually picks this up and puts it into these variables. And here we see the single add to cart button was clicked. And this is the element that I actually clicked on when I clicked on our add to cart button.

Now the key being here that we need to give our trigger now a rule that he can decide on when to actually fire our tag later on. So we want to make it very unique in order to not get mixed up. We could, for example, choose the click text which is add to cart, and which differs widely from the other click text that we have down here. We could also use the click classes which is pretty unique. So for our case I think the click classes is perfect because the others don’t really get filled here, so click classes already is great. So now we’re gonna go over to our second step to refine the filter. We go over to our trigger again and turn our generic click trigger into a specific one which is specific to our button click. We’re gonna click on the configurations and this time we don’t want to fire our trigger on all clicks but only on some clicks. So you’re gonna go to the some clicks function and then we’re gonna choose the variables that we identify to be unique in our button click. In our case that would be the click element. Now we have different matching options here like RegEx, CSS Selector, and so on. I’m gonna make it easy and just choose the contains option. So if the click element contains and what do we have to put in here? Single add to cart button. Let’s just take this part. Then I want to turn this whole trigger true and fire our tag. So let’s save this and we have now turned our generic click trigger into a specific one.

Now in order to test this out we actually need to first connect this to a tag, and we’re gonna send an event into Google Analytics. So for that we’ll go over to tags, click on new here, and give it a name. Go to tag configurations and I want to send something into Google Analytics, I have universal analytics running. The track tag will be an event, as the category, I’m just gonna type click, and as the action, add to cart. And now I have to define where to send this all. If you already have a Google Analytics setting this variable you can choose that, or go to the override settings in this tag and input your tracking ID. Now the tracking ID is specific to Google Analytics, so let’s go over to Google Analytics and in the admin section of your account, under tracking info, you can find your tracking code. Which is this ID right here. Copy that and put it into this field. Now last but not least we need to connect our tag to a trigger and we have already this part prepared. So here is our button click trigger and you can save this now. And click on our refresh button again, go back to our page, let’s close all these pages here. Reload this page, and click on our add to cart button. I will do this again with the command key pressed. We will open it up in a new tab, but we see down here our fourth event was a GTM click. If I click on this I see that no tag was actually fired, why is that? We can click on our Google Analytics event tag and maybe I did something wrong in the trigger, so I’m gonna scroll down here and I can see that the click trigger failed, so that’s the X here. And I can see that the click element didn’t contain single add to cart button. Now that wonders me, so I need to check out what is the state of the click element. So I’m gonna go over to variables and I see that here it says click element and this was what it was filled with. Now I actually originally wanted to use the click classes, so we can all learn from here you need to have the right variable and the right value in place in order for your trigger to turn true.

So let’s correct this mistake, go over to triggers again. And look quickly in here and we’ll choose the click classes instead of click element. Let’s save this, refresh. Go back to our page, reload. And click on the add to cart again. And this time we should see our tag fired, GTM click. On this click we had our event tag fire. You can also look that up in our tag assistant if there is anything sent to Google Analytics. So here we see one event that happened. And we now should also see this in our Google Analytics account and we go over to the real time reporting and under events we should see a new event entering our account. Now later on you will be able to see such click events under the behavior report under events here and that will give you all the statistics about the different events that came into your account, but this takes up to 48 hours to fill correctly. So now we have deployed our Google Analytics tag.

Now obviously we can also deploy other tags because we already have that trigger now prepared, we can reuse that trigger, so for example here I have a Facebook event that sends over a track event, add to cart, to Facebook. And we can just attach our click trigger to also fire this to Facebook. Or our AdWords conversion tracking if we want to track our add to cart click as a conversion and also use this tag with this trigger. Let’s save this, refresh, go back to our page, reload that. And click on add to cart, see if this all works. And as you see when I clicked on it we had three events fire into AdWords, Facebook, and Google Analytics. You can also see this here in our tag assistant. We have now our Google AdWords conversion tracking, we have our Facebook pixel helper, we also have received our add to cart event. Now once you have made sure that everything of this works correctly, there’s only one step to take this live onto your website and this is actually publishing this as a new version in Google Tag Manager. So click on the submit button here, enter a descriptive name. And then you can publish this onto your website and it will now be tracking the button clicks on that add to cart button for all your users on the website.

Alright, so there you have it, this is how you can track button clicks with the help of Google Tag Manager. If you are new to Google Tag Manager then I encourage you to check out our video playlist for beginners on Google Tag Manager. We have a whole tutorial series on that as well. And if you like this video then please give us a thumb’s up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian, see you in the next one.

SHOW MORE...

Google Analytics – Still the best Tracking tool in 2018?

Google Analytics has been the most used tracking tool for a long time. But there are numerous alternatives out there – So does GA still fit your needs? Or should you switch or even upgrade to GA360? Let’s weigh the Pros and Cons in this video….

🔗 Links from the video:

Google Analytics 360: https://www.google.com/analytics/360-suite/#?modal_active=none
Mixpanel: https://mixpanel.com/
KissMetrics: https://www.kissmetrics.com/
Snowplow: https://snowplowanalytics.com/

#AnalyticsTool
#GoogleAnalytics
#BestTrackingTool

Similar Videos:

Mixpanel vs. Google Analytics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TI_DvDx-DXw
5 Tracking Tools
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rijTRmtI39A

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

– Is Google Analytics still the best tool that you can use on your website in 2018? Well, let’s find out.

Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and today we wanna talk about Google Analytics and if it’s still the best analytics tool out there that you can use for your website tracking in 2018. Now, it’s definitely very popular. I actually use it religiously and I have many clients running on Google Analytics but there are certain circumstances where I would recommend a different tool.

Now, what are the advantages and disadvantages of this number one analytics tool out there? Let’s dive into some of the pro and cons. So, the number one or that everybody can think of when they think of Google Analytics is that it’s free. Now, Google Analytics came out with a free version after they bought a company called Urchin and made that website data available to their advertisers of AdWords so they can make better decisions on changing around their website and convert more people and spend more money on advertising but the tool was really powerful already at the beginning, so it widely spread all over the world and is now one of the most used analytics systems out there for website tracking. That obviously brings a lot of perks to the system. It is gathering a lot of data, it has huge support out there, so if you have any question, you can go into one of the forums and find out what you can do about your problem and since it’s connected to AdWords and that is Google’s money maker still they actually invest into the tool on a continuous basis so there are always new features coming out which is also great but on the con side the free model is not the holy grail and that’s what Google actually also discovered and they brought out a paid version of Google Analytics in their marketing suite Google 360.

You can pay everything from $20,000 a month upwards to actually get better and more data into your analytics system but also the other systems that they have out there and really get better data here. So, up to a certain level, Google Analytics is free but once you get more sophisticated, especially the sampling issue that you have in the free version is pretty annoying, then you might need to think about different systems that are out there and Google Analytics is just one of the many paid systems that you can install on your website and get click stream data from. Now, on the pro side it is pretty feature rich. Now, you need to think that the system Urchin was actually a paid product before and then Google brought it out continuously evolved it, so it has a lot, a lot of features that you can implement and customize in your Google Analytics installation and that’s a good thing, right? Well, only kind of because on the con side, Google Analytics gives you a very strict model on how to look at the data. Now, this is mainly based on their model of page view data, so when we think back 10 years, analytics and websites were not that complex and therefore Google Analytics built on that model of page views and sessions and users and they calculate a lot through that. That brought in a lot of problems as well because we had a lot of privacy issues, we have different features that we should be able to track and to use but we can’t connect that to data, the data is stored in the US so it’s under US privacy laws. That’s what the Europeans don’t really like and that’s why you can’t send any personal identifiable information into Google Analytics which is not really suited to our business model.

So, yes, Google Analytics has a lot of features but maybe you are better off with a different tool that gives you more specialized data that can connect to your business model better and give you better data and more meaningful data for your business and it’s maybe possible to build it into Google Analytics but not the best way to look at that data later on. So, be aware of these limitations once you start customizing your installation which brings us to our next point, the plus side, Google Analytics is customizable, so it’s not just out of the box although you can use it out of the box and just track page views which is not worth much anymore but you can customize a lot, so from event tracking to actually sending user IDs or custom dimensions, custom metrics, you can really spice up your tracking and transfer the requirements of your business model to this tool as well. Now, on the con side here again we have more specialized tools that might be able to track your business better. In that sense we might have different business models with mobile apps or gaming that might be suited for a different tool a little bit better or if you need to have very deep insights about your customers’ behavior because they log into your system, maybe Google Analytics is not the right tool because it makes it really hard to connect that data back and forth with personal identifiable information because they’re not allowed to send that in. So, different other tools like Mixpanel or Kissmetrics have a different model in the background and are specialized on these different customizations that you can do on the tool. So, keep that in mind, once you try to transfer your business model to your tracking model, and try to input that into Google Analytics and customize it. And last but not least, the connections. Now, on the plus side, Google Analytics is well connected. We get information automatically from AdWords, we can send it to Google Data Studio, we have Google Tag Manager available, so well-connected tool. Also, on the third-party front we have different other tools like super metrics that let us pull the data right into Google Sheets or different plugins on the WordPress side that let us install Google Analytics really easily. It’s wildly used and therefore it has very many connections out there to actually pull data in, pull data out and connect Google Analytics to different systems but on the negative side, we actually don’t get access to the raw data.

Now, in essence, Google Analytics just takes up our data and puts it into a bucket of page views and that data is very valuable if you wanted to connect it to different other tools or wanted to do deeper analysis on this raw data but Google Analytics by default at least in the free version doesn’t give us this data, so other systems might be more useful in that sense if you think about Snowplow analytics that let’s you build your own data service and when it comes to privacy reasons obviously you also want to keep your data on your own servers and that’s simply something that Google Analytics doesn’t give you once you have the free version of Google Analytics.

So, in conclusion is Google Analytics still the tool that you should be using in 2018 for your website tracking? Now, it depends. In the end, if you are heavily into customization and really want to have a business impact with your analytics, then you probably have the manpower and team and resources out there to actually search for a better solution of Google Analytics out there. If you’re not yet at that stage where you really want to make an impact with your analytics and just need standard tracking data to optimize your marketing campaigns, then Google Analytics is still one of the tools out there that is well supported, that is free and it gives you standardized data that a lot of the marketers out there understand, so I would still install it on our website but also look out for other tools that may make my analytics implementation a bit more customizable, so if I think about heat map tracking, video tracking or simply data that I can send to different other marketing tools so I can make it really actionable that might be for example Facebook analytics and the Facebook Pixel, then I really want to stress that you don’t just have to Google Analytics. It gives you some base tracking data but see what other questions, what other data you can get from other analytics systems, maybe try them out and put them onto your website as well. And that’s already it with this week’s video. If you have any questions about this or anything was missing or if you see any kind of new advantages or cons that I have missed, then I’d love to hear from you. Please leave that in the comments below and if you haven’t yet, then consider subscribing to our channel right over because we’ll bring you new video just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian, til next time.

SHOW MORE...

5 Tracking Techniques you should be using

Google Analytics tracks Pageview by default, but there is a lot of data that needs to be setup additionally to fully complete a Tracking installation. In this video we are going to take a look at 5 Tracking Techniques you should be using in your Analytics setup.

🔗 Links mentioned in the video:
Conversion Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGuiuRBYLpE
Source Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNOsldDS_pY
Event Tracking with GTM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b48PbFCNyOM&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHqk0w9OU2IypiZsH2qqdoS
Site Search Tracking: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1012264?hl=en
Error Tracking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKIyvycJbzs
Visitor Labelling: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2709828?hl=en

#TrackingTechniques
#Measure

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: http://measureschool.com/products

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool

In this video I’m gonna show you five techniques that I’m using to spice up tracking installations. All and more coming up.

Hey there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian and on this channel we do marketing tech reviews, tutorials and the occasional tips and tricks video just like this one. So, if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing and if you haven’t yet, then also click that bell notification icon so you’ll stay up to date with all the videos that come out on this channel.

Now, today we want to talk about five techniques that you can use to spice up your tracking with Google Analytics, Google AdWords but also other marketing tools out there and get better data with your tracking. Now, these are really basic tracking techniques out there but you might find that you haven’t really thought about one or the other techniques, so definitely let me know in the description below if I missed anything that you would like to see in this video as well. Now, we’ve got lots to cover, so let’s dive in.

So, the first tracking technique that you really need to take care of is your source or your campaign tracking. Now, in Google Analytics it’s already tracking a lot of sources by default, so when a user comes from one website to your website, then you can see that in the source reports or your campaign reports in Google Analytics or on other tools but sometimes you want to be very explicit about where the user actually came from, that might be the case when he come from an advertising or an email campaign because sometimes this actually gets obscured in your Google Analytics and then it goes direct into the direct none column and that’s their traffic, you don’t really know where your traffic is coming then from and therefore you should be tracking your campaigns correctly. Now, this is normally done with UTM parameters. If you want to know how to use them, then check out this video right here. But once you have them set up and know how to use them regularly when you put a new marketing campaigns, then you can get a rock solid tracking on where your traffic is coming from, where your sessions are generated from and even transfer that information further into other tracking tools, into other marketing systems, into other CRM systems so you will always know where the user originally came from once he entered your website.

Now, the second tracking technique that is very basic but a lot of people don’t have it installed is conversion tracking or goal tracking, how you call it in Google Analytics. Now, this all about the most important interactions that a user takes on your website. That might be a click, an interaction with a form or visiting a certain page on your website that is very important that actually signifies that the user has reached a certain goal or is converted or can be counted as a conversion. So, really make sure that you have something like this set up in your tracking systems in Google Analytics that would be done through goals. In something like Facebook, you would send a purchase event for example when the user has purchased something and that is interactions that you need to track in these tools in order to connect your existing data, your existing page U data with that one goal, so how many people actually converted or how many people that did one interaction also did this very important interaction. That will always give you a goal post and a better comparison of the data at hand.

Now, the third point is a bit broad but this is all about event tracking, so the interactions that a user can take on your website. By default, Google Analytics and most of the tracking tools out there do click stream analysis, so they actually send over data point once the user enters a web page and this is commonly also referred as a page U. Now, a user, especially with newer websites can do much more on a website than just go from one page to the next page to the next page, but also do interactions, so for example, click on something that changes something on your page, they can scroll down, they can view a video and so on, these are all interactions that are trackable. We have tons of videos on this channel that show you how to track certain interactions on this page with the help of Google Tag Manager which is my preferred way of doing things when it comes to event tracking but you could also build that into different other systems and make use of that but the interaction data gets very important and more and more important so in the context of tracking your website user, so definitely think about all the interactions that a user can take on your page and how important those can be for your tracking as well and how much more data you can gather that is important let you make better decisions on your analytics. Now, just to give you some example, there’s outbound link click tracking, there is form submit tracking, there’s scroll tracking, there is interaction tracking with a video or a certain element on the page. I really love the new trigger, the visibility tracking within Google Tag Manager, so you can track when something pops up on the screen and the user actually sees it. So, these all interactions that might be very relevant for your user and also could feed into the conversion tracking later, so definitely think about event tracking in your tracking setup.

Now, number four here is an oldie but goodie and this is the site search tracking. Now, this is all about if you have a search bar or a search field on your website where the user can look through your website, defined to your website. You should definitely track that because it holds a lot of value about what the user is thinking at the time of what he is searching for so you can track the intent of the user. Now, Google famously took away these keyword data that we were used to get from Google directly once the user came to our page and we could see our keyword reports in Google Analytics. That’s not very accurate anymore but the site search tracking is your next best bet to actually find out what are the users that are actually already on your website searching for and wanting to find on your website and maybe even combine that with a search result page that has zero results. How could you make this better or maybe build more relevant pages or find more relevant products for the user, create research tool as well. So, definitely install site search tracking on your website in order to pick up these search intents from your users.

And last but not least, number five, the error tracking. So, you know these nasty errors that come up when somebody comes from a search engine to your website and doesn’t find a website, a 404 error is most commonly showed to the user and these can actually be tracked, so every time somebody comes to a 404 error page, you should track that, for example, as an event in Google Analytics but also where the user actually came from and what he requested, what kind of resource did he request. That’s very important to later go through and find out what are the pages that are maybe broken on my website or that I have linked up incorrectly and then you can correct that on your website or redirect the user to a relevant page and helps so the user doesn’t leave your website right away. So, these are the five tracking techniques that you definitely should be using.

One bonus tip here, number six is actually the visitor labeling. So, once a visitor comes to your website, a visitor is just an anonymous person coming to your website but for example, he undertakes maybe an interaction like a log in or he does something like sends out a form field, then he becomes something else, he becomes a user that actually interacted in a certain given way with your website and maybe can be classified as a certain different type of visitor and that is information that you also should be tracking in your analytics systems. So, maybe you can then segment your users into paying customers, to regular users, returning users, or people who have already an account with your company and that will make your work in Google Analytics and in the analysis later on so much easier because you can actually segment and filter those people out and only look at certain given groups that actually make sense for your analysis. So, definitely think about the visitor labeling as a tracking technique as well.

And that’s already it with this week’s video. If you found something that was missing and you always install with your Google Analytics installations, or with any other tracking setup, then I’d love to hear from you in the comments below if I forgot anything and if you like this video and it helped you out, then why not give us a thumbs up, share it to a friend or a colleague and definitely also subscribe to our channel, click that bell notification icon because we’ll bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian, til next time.

SHOW MORE...