Google Data Studio Tutorial (2019) 📊 – How to build a Dashboard with GDS

Google Data Studio is Google’s prime tool to build Data Visualisations. Today, Ahmad of Siavak is going to show us how to make the most of this Analytics tool and build a quick dashboard for us.

🔗 Links:

Google Data Studio Tutorial Playlist – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0rV4ZS-ruQ&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGijmrFPjYSeKwLbnsqwq1e

Google Data Studio – https://datastudio.google.com/navigation/reporting

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

It’s 2019. And one of the hottest products from the Google Analytics line is probably Google Data Studio. They have improved the tool so much over the last few months and over the last few years that I wanted to update our tutorial on Google Data Studio. Now, I’ve asked Ahmad to come up with a quick overview video on talking you through the most important features of Google Data Studio, how to build a dashboard with it, and go through the general process of creating a dashboard and sharing it out to your stakeholders. Now, this is by no means a complete tutorial. All the features that are out there, and Google Data Studio this will take far too long. But we have a playlist on Google Data Studio where we explain certain features in mode, so check those out as well if you’re interested. But for now, we got lots to cover, so Ahmad take it away.

Thanks, Julian. This is Ahmad from Siavak. And in this video, I’m going to give you a quick overview of Google Data Studio. Data Studio is a free tool from Google that allows you to connect to and pull data from different data sources like Google Analytics, Google Ads, Facebook Ads, or even Google Sheets, and then easily create visual reports to share with your clients, stakeholders and team members. In this video, I’m going to show you many features of Google Data Studio as we create this awesome ecommerce reports together. Exciting, isn’t it? Let’s dive in and see how it works. This is the main interface of Google Data Studio. We can see your previous reports in the middle and at the top, you can choose to start with a template or create a blank report.

We are going to start with creating a blank report. The first thing we need to do is to connect our report to a data source. We can do it by clicking on Create new data source. Google Data Studio can connect to a lot of different data sources. There are free connectors available for Google products, such as Google Ads, Google Analytics, Google Sheets, or even Google Bitquery. And for everything else, we can use partner connectors. Partner connectors allow us to connect to many different data sources like Bing, Facebook, Instagram, Adroll, etc. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’re going to hit cancel. And it starts with the sample Google Analytics data provided with Google. collect data reports, and we are good to go. First things first,let’s give our report a name.

Next, let’s add the header. We started creating a rectangle, resizing it and changing its color. Next, we’re going to add a title. You can select the text, change the color, and change the size of the font, and also resize the widget and move it to better place. Now let’s add some numbers to our reports by adding some scorecards. Score points are good for showing KPIs or key performance indicators. Basically, any number. I’m going to head to is style tab to give our scorecard a border and round the corners. Let’s adjust the padding as well. And then I’m going to head over to the data and enable the date range comparison. So I’m going to compare this metric to the previous period. And here he appears. Now that we are happy with the scorecards, we can duplicate and create more. This retains the styling and the configuration for the date. The only thing we need to do is to change the metric. For this one, let’s choose transactions. We can drag it over to replace the metric. Or we can continue this process to make more scorecards. For this, I’d like to have product detail list. Drag and drop, and we’re done. Next one is a revenue.

And I’m going to change this one to show a compact number. Next up average order value. So as you can see, I can just type in here to search for all the metrics that are available in my data set. It’s a drag and drop them to the left to change the metric. Now let’s create some room for our final metric which is ecommerce conversion rate. I’m using my keyboard to move the scorecards around. And I can even control C and control V on my keyboard to copy and paste and create a new ecommerce. Now let’s see from which countries are we getting our revenue from. For this purpose, I’m going to add a map to the report. Now each shade represent the number of sessions, but we’d like to replace it with revenue. See which country bringing more revenue to our commerce store. And just to make it clear for the end user that what metric is being represented by this graph. Let’s add a title and call it revenue by country. Next, let’s see some trends. By adding a time series charts to our report. Just like the scorecards above, I’m going to give it a border and also change the radius for the corners. Let’s decide what numbers do we want to show on this chart. I’m going to head over to the Data tab and search for some metrics. I want sessions to be either, but they also want to see product detail we use product adds to cart and transactions.

Let’s duplicate this and create another chart for revenue. Right click and select Duplicate. Ok. So now I’m going to remove the metrics and replace the final one because I’d like to see the trend of revenue over time. But for this chart, I’d like to see how revenue builds up over time during this time period. Now if you’re going to duplicate this and create not a chart to show e-commerce conversion rates over time. I’m using my keyword to move this around. Just like before, you can head over to the Data tab, search for metric and replace the metric on the chart by dragging dropping the new metric over the previous one. For this one, however, I don’t want it to be cumulative. So uncheck this but I do like to see a trend line. Cool, isn’t it. Now let’s add a pie chart. To see the distribution between male and female users. Drag it over here choose gender as the dimension for this pie chart, and we can leave the metric to be the number of sessions. I’m going to head over to style tab. But I want to move the legend over the top just to make some room for the next visualization we want to create.

Now let’s use this space to create another chart and see which cities are we getting the most revenue from. For this purpose. let’s choose the bar chart, the horizontal bar chart. Move it here, resize it to fit, adjust the size to make room for the name of the cities, changed the metric to revenue. Premium sessions and change a dimension to city. Our ultimate commerce reports is almost finished. Let’s see how does it look for the end user. Looks nice, doesn’t it. But there is a problem. This report is a static and the user cannot interact with it. They cannot choose the time period or take a look at different segments of data. So let’s go back to edit mode and add some features and interactivity to this report. The first thing we’re going to do is to allow the end user to change the time period after report. And this is done by adding a date control filter just like this. Going to head over to this time tab and change some colors to make it visible. Now, the reviewer of the report can easily choose the timeframe for which they want to look at this report just like this. Now let’s go back to edit mode and add some more cool features to this report. I’m going to select these all, bring them down to make some room for the extra features we’re going to add.

First, we’re going to add a drop down menu that allows users to take a look at traffic from different source mediums. This is done by adding a filter control to report. By default it sets to medium as its dimension, we’re going to change it to source medium. Again, we’re simply dragging and dropping. Next, I’m going to duplicate this. Create another one for device category, which basically means desktop, mobile or tablet and allows them to look at traffic only from desktop devices, the tablets or mobiles. And finally, I’m going to duplicate again and allow the end user to filter my user time. Which basically means is that the new user or a returning users. Now let’s review our report again and see how does it look. Now it’s possible for the end user to filter this report base on any of these criteria. For example, they can choose to only look at desktop traffic. And all the numbers and charts will be updated to reflect the choice.

Now that we created this ultimate ecommerce report together, it is time to share it with others. Let’s take a look at different sharing options we have access to in Data Studio. The first option is to download the report as a PDF form. And we can even protect it with a password. The next option is to set up automatic delivery of the report via email. So Data Studio, emails a PDF version of this report to the email addresses that you choose on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. We can simply create a link to this report. Or we can share it with other people, just like any other Google Drive document. Just like a Google doc or Google Sheet, you can get a shareable link, or you can share this report with the specific emails. So as you can see, there are lots of options for you to share a report with the people who need to review it. Okay, I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s video, in which we learned how to use Google Data Studio to connect to a data source and create a beautiful, interactive and fully functional report and share it with others in about 15 minutes. I’m going to post a link to this report in the descriptions. So you can review it and grab a copy for yourself to play around with. To make a copy of the report inside your own Google Data Studio account, simply click on this little icon. That’s it for today. Thanks for watching.

All right, so there you have it. This is a quick overview on Google Data Studio, how you can use it and hopefully you know now if you should use it for building your dashboard. It’s pretty easy actually. But there are some quirks of it. So I also encourage you to check out our playlist which I’ve linked up right over there which will show you a few more details of Data Studio and a few more specific details on how you can utilize the tool for effective dashboard building. And as always, if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing right over there to our channel because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian. See in the next one.

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How to Install the Twitter Universal Website Tag with Google Tag Manager

The Twitter Universal Website tag provides Twitter Conversion Tracking and Twitter Retargeting conveniently through one Tag. If you have Google Tag Manager installed you can now easily implement it. In this video, learn how you can set up Twitter tag properly and also define your audience and conversion tracking.

🔗 Links:

Twitters ads – https://ads.twitter.com/login

Twitters offical documentation – https://business.twitter.com/en/solutions/twitter-ads/website-clicks/set-up-conversion-tracking.html

Google Tag Manager – https://tagmanager.google.com

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Twitter has their own tag, the Twitter universal website tag. And in this video, I’m going to show you how you can install it via Google Tag Manager. Now, my name is Julian and you’re watching measureschool.

All right, today our journey starts in our demo shop where we already have Google Tag Manager installed. And we now want to add to this our Twitter ads tracking. So obviously, you would need to have a Twitter account, we have one here at measureschool. So follow if you want to stay up to date with everything that we do. And connected to this account is our Twitter ads account. Now, just like in Facebook, you can get your Twitter pixel by going to tools and then conversion tracking. And here we have our universal website tag that needs to be installed. And you can view the code instructions right here. Here’s the code that we need to install through Google Tag Manager. But really all that we need is this little part of our Twitter universal website tag which will identify us to Twitter. So let’s copy that and go over to Google Tag Manager. And here we’re going to create a new tag. This will be our Twitter ads tag. It’s our universal tag which we’re going to deploy on all pages.

As a tag configuration, we can choose a template here from Twitter, which is already in the system to the universal website tag. And we put in our pixel ID which was these few characters from our pixel. Now, we can select different events. But since we are the deploying on all our pages, just go with page view and not put in anything specific right here. Let’s choose our trigger, which is all pages trigger, and save this.

Refresh our preview in debug mode, go back to our page, refresh that.

And we can see we have our Twitter ads universal pixel for tag deployed. Now there is actually a Chrome extension that you can install in order to check whether this was fired correctly. And this is what I have installed here, the Twitter pixel helper. And it shows us that the Twitter pixel has fired successfully. Unfortunately, there is no way in Twitter to see any kind of debug information or if this pixel was sent over correctly, at least not in real time. What you would need to do is either set up a new conversion event with the universal website tag in order to see if conversions are tracked correctly. And you can specify like in the Facebook pixel, as well, if you want to filter this down to an exact URL. Or you would need to actually set up an audience. Again, you will need to utilize the website visitor collection tag here, which is based on the universal website tag which we have just installed. And deploy this on the page and then see whether data is coming through. But this can take a while till the audience needs to be populated by your website tag. So no real way to verify this within Twitter ads directly. Our best bet is to utilize our Twitter pixel helper. Now that we have verified this, at least with the pixel helper and our debug console; let’s go ahead and actually publish a version by going back into our Google Tag Manager account, clicking on Submit and giving our version of name.

And then publishing this so it goes live to our users.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can install the Twitter universal website tag onto your website with the help of Google Tag Manager. Now you saw a little more options within the Google Tag Manager interface on how you can configure this tag. I will just leave it up to you to try this out and build your conversions for your audiences of this pixel. I’d love to hear from you if you want to have a closer description on this whole feature of how to track conversions. And let me know in the comments down below and we could do another tutorial on it. Otherwise, why not give us a thumbs up if you liked this video and also subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian till next time.

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How to install the LinkedIn Insight Tag with Google Tag Manager

LinkedIn Insight tag can help you track your conversion, website demographics and retargeting for your LinkedIn ad campaigns. With the help of Google Tag Manager, let’s go through the easy steps on how you can properly add this tracking code snippet to your website.

🔗 Links:

Google Tag Manager https://tagmanager.google.com

LinkedIn Campaign Manager https://www.linkedin.com/ad-beta/login

LinkedIn Insights Tag Documentation https://www.linkedin.com/help/lms/answer/65521/the-linkedin-insight-tag-frequently-asked-questions?lang=en

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Google has their Gtag. Facebook has their pixel and LinkedIn as their Insights tag. Today, I’m going to show you how you can install this via Google Tag Manager onto your website. My name is Julian, and this is another episode of measureschool.

All right, welcome back to our demo shop where we want to install our LinkedIn tracking. Now, to do this, we need to have Google Tag Manager already set up. So this is the case on this page, we are in the preview mode. So Google Tag Manager is installed correctly. And you will need to have a LinkedIn account that you can connect to your ads. By the way, we also have a measureschool LinkedIn page that you can follow to stay up to date with what we do here. But inside of your Linkedin account, you can go over to this work tab here, go to advertise. And this will put you into the LinkedIn campaign manager. So here we have our demo shop account which we have already set up and we’re going to go ahead and click on account assets up here to install our insight tag. The first thing that you should do here is to add your domain. Now I’ve already done this, as you can see here, this is important. So we’ll be able to later check if our tag is working correctly. Now let’s go ahead and click on this manage insight tag to see our actual tag. And if you click on this first point, I will install the tag myself we get our code that needs to be deployed. Now, all we need from this code is actually this number right here. So I’m going to copy this. Unfortunately, we can’t copy the number. So I’m just going to go ahead and open up the developer tools. Here we have our console, just going to paste this in here, just so I can copy out this number that we would need. Close this again and go over to Google Tag Manager. In order to install the Facebook inside tag, we just go to new tag gives us a proper name.

And in the tag configurations, we already have a tag template available to search for it. And here we go. We have our LinkedIn Insight tag. And all we need to do is input the partner ID. Now there are some more settings here. But we can safely ignore them as we don’t want to customize our tracking in any way. And all we need to do now is to deploy our tags on all pages. LinkedIn insights tag will provide us with information about page views. Will also let us retarget and to conversion tracking. So let’s see if it works by refreshing our page in the preview and debug mode, going back to our page right here. And we can see our LinkedIn insights tag already fired. Now there is no tag extension that we can install in order to see if LinkedIn is working correctly. So we need to trust our Google Tag Manager console down here that it deployed correctly. The ultimate test would obviously be inside of our LinkedIn campaign manager if we see that there would be a signal that it was sent. Unfortunately, this takes a while. So we’ll be able to test this right now. Depending on your website traffic, as it says here, up to 24 hours. So you might want to check back later if there has been a signal received by LinkedIn. With that in place, we can go ahead and now deploy our tracking to all our website users by going to the submit button, entering a version name.

And publishing this to all our users. So it goes live on our website. And this way, we have installed the LinkedIn insight tag via Google Tag Manager on to our website. Now, what if you would like to install conversion tracking for your LinkedIn ads campaigns. This is also something that’s possible. Let’s go over here to conversions. And we can create a conversion by entering our conversion name, for example, the thank you the purchase of a product, let’s call this purchase.

And entering our settings, we choose a type here, for example, purchase. And we can estimate a conversion value that we want to enter. Now, unfortunately, we will not be able to port this over dynamically. So you could put an average value in here or nothing at all if you don’t want to put in a value, that’s fine as well. You can then choose the attribution window, select the campaign that you want to attach this to I don’t have a campaign set up right now. And then define whether you want to set this up through the insight tag, which is already installed on our page. Or want to deploy a specific pixel that fires when the user tags this specific action. If you go with the first option is pretty easy. But you can only track if somebody views a page. So for example here, we have ecommerce store. So I’m just going to go through a conversion really quickly.

And we get to our order receipt page, somebody has bought something. So this is the URL that we could now utilize in order to tell our linked and campaign manager that we want to count it as a conversion. So for example, we can choose different methods here, have the URLs that contain a specific text in our case, would be auto receives because the other parts will change over time. So order receipts would be fine. And we can create a conversion. So every time a user clicks on an ad, then converts gets to that page, it will be counted as a conversion. If you want to be a little bit more specific and use the capabilities of Google Tag Manager, we can obviously also utilize the event-specific methods. So let’s go ahead and set up a second conversion here, which will be again, a purchase, which leave everything untouched. But this time, we want to install an event-specific pixel. And this will give us an image tag.

Now we’re going to copy this, just be aware that this image tag is specific to the conversion that we set up. So if you want to be in any kind of way dynamic, you won’t be able to do this. This will only count a conversion for this one that we have set up right here. And what do we do with this code? In Google Tag Manager, we can go ahead and add a new tag. And this tag, this time is not a LinkedIn insights tag. And unfortunately, there’s also no specific event specific pixel that we can use for LinkedIn. So we will go with the option of the custom image tag right here. And we simply enter the image URL. Now, we don’t need this whole HTML that is around the actual URL of our image. So we’re going to get rid of that, which starts right here after the source attribute, let’s get rid of that. And in the end, we also get rid of the HTML here. So this part would be our image URL that we want to fire when the user succeeds. If we wanted to recreate exactly what we have right here, can look into our preview mode. And we see there’s a custom event here called GTMForWP.ordercompleted, this is custom to my website because I have set up the Google Tag Manager for WordPress plugin. And based on that, I can build a custom trigger. So I’m going to build a new trigger that will fire on a custom event, which is this GTMForWP.ordercompleted, let me just see the exact event name right here. I’m going to copy that. And as the trigger configurations, I’m going to choose the custom event. And he going to put in GTMForWP.ordercompleted. Now, this is just an example, it might be that you want to for example, use a button click as a conversion goal or a form submit, then you would obviously need to change this trigger around. Let’s get this whole tag a name. This is still our LinkedIn tag. This time, it’s an event-specific tab for our purchase. Let’s save this and refresh and go back to our page, Now, we will need to go through a conversion again.

And here we go. We get to the order receive page. And we see our LinkedIn event purchase pixel has now fired it’s a custom image tag. And that sends the information over to LinkedIn. Again, you need to be patient here in order to see data showing up. Especially the conversion tracking only works when you actually have clicked on a LinkedIn ad, and then went through and purchase the product. So that’s the only reliable way to ensure that this is actually working correctly. So since we only can see this in our preview mode, we would actually need to deploy it to all our users by again submitting a new version, publishing this and now goes live on our website.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can install the LinkedIn ads insights tag. I need to get used to the names of so onto your website with the help of Google Tag Manager. It’s such a pity that we aren’t able to put in dynamic values such as our conversion value into this tag so Linkedin would actually pick that up and put it into our reporting. What do you think? Let me know in the comments down below. And as always, if you liked this video, then why not give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian till next time.

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How to use a dataLayer variable to pull data from the GTM dataLayer [Quick Tip]

If you have GTM dataLayer on your website you can extract data from it and make it available in a Variable in Google Tag Manager.
In this video, let’s look out how we can utilize the data layer variable to pull out values from a data layer by knowing the key and the nested values.

🔗 Links:

DataLayer: https://support.google.com/tagmanager/answer/6164391?hl=en

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hey, there measure geeks. Julian here. Back with another quick tip video. Today, we want to talk about how you can pull out data from the data layer variable. Now, if you’re familiar with data layers, you know, you can push them in the background of a page and they look a little bit something like this in terms of the code so the user wouldn’t see a data layer push actually happening. But this data is now available within the data layer which is Google Tag Manager’s central repository of structured data. And we can send information into the data layer by different methods. Once they are in the data layer, you should be able to see that information in different ways. So for example, if you have the preview and debug mode open if you go to the data layer, you should see the information that was pushed into the data layer here under the data layer tab. You should also be able to see a push, depending on how it was pushed in the developer tools under elements.

Let’s look here for data layer, we have different data layers here. And here we go. This is the formation that we pushed earlier on this page. Actually, it’s here. And so you should also be able to see it in the console. If you simply type in data capital layer. In here, we open up the data layer array. And here we have our different objects. Now each object has key and then value pairs. So you always have this pair of a key, which in this case, would be event. And the value, in this case, would be blog post view. Now what if you wanted to pull out one or the other value from the data layer and make it available to your tags or your triggers, you would need to utilize a data layer variable. For that, you will need to know the key in order to pull out the value in our case it would be the author, and we should be able to pull out the value of admin. So let’s go over to Google Tag Manager on the variables, we simply going to build a new data layer variable, I’m going to name this with pretending DMV, and then my data layer would be for the author.

And now I’m going to go into the configurations and choose data layer variable. And here I will put in the data layer variable key. It actually says name here. But I find this a little bit confusing. I would rather remember this as key. And this key needs to be corresponding to whatever we have in the data layer as this first key that is tied to our value. So in our case, it would be author. And we can put in different configurations. You don’t really need to care about those unless you have a specific reason for it. Let’s go ahead and save and try this all up. We’re just going to refresh our previous debug mode, and then go back to our page. Reload that. And now under variables, we should be able to see our key. Now it’s always important variables are resolved based on these events. And the events are really like little checkpoints that you have on the page. So if you want to utilize your variable, your author variable upon page view, you would see that this is still undefined. On the second event here, we would see that now the dlv author is actually filled and it will stay filled unless it’s overwritten by the later events.

So if you would like to use this later in a trigger or a tag, be sure to fire it on the right event. So your data layer variable gets filled. Now it’s as easy as that, you will just need to know the right key, and then input that in your data layer variable to pull data out. But not all the data layers look like this. This is a pretty flat data layer. So you will just have a key and then a value. But you can actually nest these data layers within each other. So here we for example, have the GTM key which holds an object and I can see this in these curly brackets. And within this object, there is another key value pair. You might be familiar with a data layer that comes from an order received page, for example. Here we have the enhanced ecommerce tracking data layer. And this is pretty nested already. So we have our data layer object of first one, then we have within that our data layer ecommerce within ecommerce. Within that we have another data layer object, and then we have different keys. And within that, again, data layer object. A little bit hard to read within the preview and debug mode. So let’s open up our JavaScript console here.

And I’m going to look into the data layer by simply inputting again data layer, so we have four objects right now. And we want to look at this ecommerce which is up here. So we have this triangle which we can click on to open up. And here we can see the nesting pretty well at work. We have an ecommerce data layer object and we can open that up. We have within that a currency code and a purchase. Within the purchase, we have an action field within the actual field, we have, for example, the order ID in this case, it would be 309. If we wanted to pull out this 309, it would not be enough to just know the key here, the ID. We would actually need to utilize a special notation which is the dot notation. In order for Google Tag Manager to go down the tree and find the ID within our object. What would this dot notation look like? Or if you hover over it, you already see here, ecommerce purchase action field ID. And in between those days I was a dot. And this is exactly what we would need to write into our data layer variable if you wanted to pull out the order ID. So let’s try this out. Let’s go over two variables and build a new data layer variable for order ID.

And we go again to data layer variable. And we’ll start out with our first object here which was ecommerce. And I will separate this with a dot further into this ecommerce object, which the next object would be purchase. dot and here again, action field. And here we get to our ID. So we’ll put this one in here as well.

Let’s test this all out, Save and refresh, I’m going to reload this page, unfortunately, I will need to go through another another order right here. And here we go get to the next order receipt page. And if I click on the right event here, let’s go with the page view and I go to variables, you should be able to see now our dlv order ID was filled with our 315, which should be our new order ID that we can see right here. So it pulled out the right ID by using the dot notation to get into the nested values of this data layer object. Now, there is one last specialty about these nested object you might encounter that you want to pull out a value from a key pair that is actually inside of an array. What is an array? In JavaScript terms, it’s simply a list that is marked by these square brackets. So depending on how many products I bought here, so we have exactly two products, we should have a list of two products with some information in there. And here we go. If we had three products bought or have four products bought, this list would obviously get longer.

Now, you will need to tell Google Tag Manager explicitly that you want to pull data from the first product or the second product. So for example, if you wanted to get the product price here, we would need to access this array. And this would be done again with the dot notation. But this time, we will use numbers in order to find the right member of this array. Let’s try this first out in inside of our developer tools. Under console, I’m going to put in data layer again and go to our ecommerce object. We’re going to click once and then purchase, then we get to product. And here you can already see this special notation here. If I click on those, we have these numbers up here zero and one. And this is how our area is actually counted the first numbers zero, the second number is one. So if I wanted to get the product price for this first product, I would need to use the dot notation with zero and then our price key. So let’s try this out. Go again into our data layer variables, create a new one, product price of product number one and go with the data layer variable. Put in the same thing again, it begins with ecommerce dot purchase dot product this time.

And then as with the dot notation, we’re going to go into the first product which is zero and get to our price. See if I didn’t make any mistake, that should do it. Yes, save this and refresh. And I’m going to go through another order here.

And we get to our order receipt page. Our happy ninja one is the price is $35. So now if I go to the variables, if you done everything correct should see our $35 right here. It pulled it out out of the data layer for this first product. Obviously, you will need to repeat this for your different other products if you want to pull out the price of those. And that’s already with our little quick tip video. You now know how to utilize data layer variable to pull out values from a data layer by simply knowing about the key and then the nested values that might be within the data layer and how to structure your key in order to find the right product within a nested data layer.

Hey there it’s me again. Thanks for checking out our quick the video. Was that helpful? Did you understand something not quite? Then I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. But if you liked it, then why not give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian, til next time

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The best way to Install Google Analytics on to a WordPress Website?

Adding Google Analytics to your WordPress site can help you track your website visitors. In this video, I will show you these 3 methods on how you can install GA to your WordPress site so you can choose which one to implement.

1. Use of Plugins
2. Install and hard code in the theme file
3. GTM deployment

🔗 Links:

GTM for Beginners series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPEdkc_feNM&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZHGni1H-mz2P7lbZ7PmAn1B

MonsterInsights: https://wordpress.org/plugins/google-analytics-for-wordpress/

Google Analytics https://analytics.google.com/analytics/web/

WordPress www.wordpress.com/‎

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, I’m going to show you the best method on how to install Google Analytics on your WordPress website. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measuregeeks! Julian here back with another video teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. Now, today we want to talk about how to install Google Analytics on a WordPress website. And as always, there’s not just one way of doing things. So today, I’m going to show you actually three ways on how to install Google Analytics on to your WordPress website. And later on, you can pick which one suits you best. I will also give you my recommendation at the end of this video. Now, we’ve got lots to cover so let’s dive in.

All right, welcome to our demo software we want to install Google Analytics on. Now, in order to do this, we need to have two things in place already. First of all, we need to have access to the admin area which we can reach under our domain name slash WP admin login and now be able to install Google Analytics on your website. Be sure to have access to the back end. Second part would be to have an actual tracking ID. And this is what you can get at analytics.google.com login with your Google account, and then navigate to the account that you want to install. If you don’t have an account set up, you will be greeted with setting up a new account. Let’s quickly go through this. First of all, we want to track a website. Let’s choose an account name. Normally, you would choose your company name, then you can give your web property or the web tracking code a name. So for example, for us, it would be our demo shop. And then you enter your website URL.

In our case would be right here. Now, be sure to not have the HTTP part up here at the beginning. You can choose if you’re on HTTP or SSL in this drop-down menu. And then you can choose your industry and also your reporting timezone. Now, this is very important because you want to ensure that the timezone matches up with the timezone on your website to be able to compare data later. So make sure that this is set correctly. And you can choose if you want to take part in some more data options that Google Analytics provides. I’ll just leave them tick for now. And we can now click on Get our tracking ID. We need to agree to the data processing terms. This might differ from where you are located at. And I’ll accept this. And now we should get our tracking code. We jump right into the section. Now if you already have an account set up, you can simply go here to the admin section. And then on the property section, you find the tracking info that you can open up and go to the tracking code.

So you get to the same place here. And here’s where we get our tracking ID that we will utilize to install Google Analytics on our website. Let’s get to installing it. And I’m going to show you three methods here. The first method is through a plugin. So we’ll go down here to our plugins section and add a new plugin. And we simply type in Google Analytics. There are different plugins out there that will help you to install Google Analytics or choose the most popular option which is the Google analytics dashboard plugin for WordPress by monster insights. So let’s install this and activated and will put us in this setup screen. And we simply follow along with our Setup Manager here will connect monster insights to our Google Analytics. It will authenticate us to Google, we allow the settings and then we can choose our account. In our case, we had our tracking ID already available here, just going to copy this. And we’ll find here our view that we want to connect. And we will complete the connection. We can choose different tracking options. I will leave them untouched for now. But this is really about the customization of your tracking code. And that should do it we exit our wizard. And we should have now Google Analytics installed as easy as that. How can we verify that this is actually working?

Well, one is an extension by Google that you can install to your Chrome browser which is the Google Tag assistant. And we see here that Google Analytics is installed, but there is no HTTP response. And this is because Google Analytics is actually blocked for people who are admins and logged in to WordPress at the moment. So let’s open up a private browsing mode here. And I’m just going to navigate to my page. And now we are not logged in. And we can see here, Google Analytics is now deployed. Now depending on if this green or blue, this doesn’t really matter. But it seems like Google Analytics has been deployed correctly. We can also test this by going into our Google Analytics here. And here we see the status. And what we can do is test our implementation by going into the real-time traffic reports through this link. And here you can see that a page view was just generated. So this means that the user that is right now on the website which is us has generated a page view. So if we would go to the next page here should have another page view enter the picture. So Google Analytics is correctly installed. And this is our first method of how we can install Google Analytics via a plugin. I’d recommend this for everyone who doesn’t want to get technical and install Google Analytics in a very easy way. But the downsides might be that you have to install an additional plugin. This can potentially bog down your WordPress installation and slow down your page. So I want to show you another method of how you can install Google Analytics on your website. And this is through the installation in the theme files directly. So let’s head back into our WordPress back end. And I’m going to deactivate our plugin.

And now let’s go ahead and install Google Analytics again through the theme files. For that will go over to appearance, then theme editor. Now as it says here, it’s recommended that you have a child theme already set up that will let you install these codes into your child theme so that don’t get overwritten next time your theme updates. So definitely have a child theme set up first, then we can go ahead and proceed here. Click on I understand, select your child theme. And then find the header.php. Now, this needs to be set up in your child theme in order to edit this. So we’re going to click on it. And now we have access to the theme that governs our website, and especially the header of that theme. Now, we go back to Google Analytics and click back into our tracking information to get our tracking code. And here we have the global site tag, we can just simply copy. And it says here that we should install this in the head section. So with our theme open right here, we can add our information.

And I’d suggest to put this right under the meta tags right here. Just paste this in. The earlier the Google Analytics code will fire, the more likely it is to send data of so even if the user navigates on before the site has ended loading, you’ll be able to capture information. So now that we have this setup, let’s update our file and head back to our page. Now, we should see in our tag assistant, the global site tag is installed and Google Analytics so it’s already sending data over. Let’s look into our real-time reporting inside of Google Analytics. And here, we also see that there are page views already generated. If we go on to another page here, we should again see data coming in right here we see a new page view. So Google Analytics is installed correctly for our page. And this was also an easy method to install. If you are comfortable with copy-pasting code into your theme file if you have a child theme set up and don’t want to use a plugin to install your Google Analytics on your page. Now let’s go on to the last method that I want to show you. And this is installing Google Analytics through Google Tag Manager. Now Google Tag Manager is a tag management tool. So it manages all your tracking in one central place. And this is a Google Tag Manager container. To get started with Google Tag Manager, head over to tagmanager.google.com and create a new account, you can follow the steps as we’ve done before in our Google Analytics set up. So we had your company here, and then your website.

You’re going to go with web, and create this and then we’re entering our Google Tag Manager container. Now the first thing that we need to do, we also need to install a container snippet onto our page into our theme files just like we did before. So let’s get go ahead and follow again the steps that we just did earlier, I’m going to copy the first code that needs to be in the head section. We’re going to go into to our theme settings and our theme editor, choose our child theme here, go into our theme header PHP. And this time, I’m going to get rid of our global site tag that we have installed right here. Instead, paste our code of Google Tag Manager. Then there is a second code that we need to place beneath the opening body tag. So we’re going to look for the body where it starts right here. And right underneath going to post our Google Tag Manager, no script tag. Let’s update this file.

Now we can head back to our page, reload that. And in our tagging system, we see that we have Google Tag Manager now installed. But Google Analytics is actually not yet part of this implementation. We will need to deploy Google Analytics through Google Tag Manager. How do you do this? Well, in Google Tag Manager now, you have access to the website itself through that central snippet that we’ve installed on all the pages. We just need to deploy the tracking tool that we want to install through this Management Console. And you do this by going into Google Tag Manager and clicking on new tag and give this all a name. So we’ll be able to recognize this later. And then when we click on tag configurations, we can see all the different tools that you can install through Google Tag Manager onto your page. Now, we are interested in Google Analytics, which is right on the top right here. So I’m going to click on that. And we want to set over a page view, Now, we need to specify the account which we can do by setting up a new Google Analytics settings variable.

Here, we need to implement our tracking ID. Go over to Google Analytics, go into our tracking information and copy the tracking ID right here. Go back to Google Tag Manager, paste it in here. I’ll also take this as a name here. So I will be able to recognize this later. Let’s save this. And this is really what we would need, we just need to define a trigger right here. And there’s already one available which is the all pages trigger. So it will be deployed on all the pages. Let me fix this typo up here. And we are good to go. Let’s save this. And now we have implemented one tag into our tag manager. We can try this all out by going into the preview mode. This will put our browser into a special mode. So we will be able on our page when we reload our page to see a debug console down here which will show us which tag have fired on our page. Very practical to see if your tracking is actually deployed. And he will see our Google Analytics is deployed, we can also cross check this in our tag assistant. Here we go. The tag assistant shows that Google Analytics is deployed. And also in our real-time reporting. There’s one user right now. And here we go our page was sent and received by Google Analytics.

Now be aware once we’re in the preview mode, this is actually only deployed for you on your browser. This is not yet live on your website. In order to push this live to the website, we will need to submit a version. This is what this big Submit button is for click on here and we can give our version a name. So you’ll be able to see all the changes we have done to our container later on. Let’s publish this and it’s should be now live on our website. So if I go back here and leave the preview mode, reload our page, you now see Google Analytics is installed and Google Tag Manager. Now, don’t worry if those are not green. This just means that it’s a nonstandard implementation since you have done it through Google Tag Manager. But your data is still safely sent and received by Google Analytics.

Now you have seen that we have gone through quite some steps in order to set this up with Google Tag Manager. The big advantage to this setup is that you will be more flexible once you want to do customization and really get into advanced tracking techniques. Because not only can you deploy easily Google Analytics, but also your facebook pixel, Google Ads tracking, conversion tracking, or even set up certain triggers that trigger on interactions such as a button click or when something comes into view, or form Submit. So very versatile when it comes to expanding your tracking beyond the scope of just deploying a tracking code like Google Analytics onto your page. It also decouples what you set up in your WordPress installation. So if you ever wonder what tracking code is firing where you would be able to look this up in your central tracking tool which is in this case, Google Tag Manager. So for me, setting up Google Analytics through Google Tag Manager is the best way to set up Google Analytics as it brings a lot of advantages of expanding our tracking later on.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can install Google Analytics onto your WordPress website. I showed you three ways. One is the plugin. One is to install and hard code, essentially, the code onto your theme file, and then the deployment through Google Tag Manager. Now, I made it already clear that I prefer the more hard way of doing things, which is the deployment through Google Tag Manager just because it makes me more flexible later on. If I want to install the Facebook pixel or Google Ads tracking later on, then I’d be able to do this seamlessly through Google Tag Manager. There are a lot of advantages. And if you want to find out more about Google Tag Manager, we actually have a Google Tag Manager for beginners course up right here that you can view and learn more about now. I’d love to hear from you. Which implementation method did you pick? Or will you change your implementation method right now onto your WordPress website? Let me know in the comments down below. And as always, if you liked this video, why not give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian till next time.

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How to Scrape Data Using Chrome Dev Tools and GTM [Quick Tip]

Chrome Developer Tools have several uses. In this quick video, let’s go through the steps on how you can utilize the Chrome dev tools to build a custom JavaScript variable that can pull out any value from the document object model.

Use .innerHTML to get the inside of the DOM node

Full code template for the custom JS variable

function(){
return document.querySelector(“CHROMEDEVTOOLS”).innerHTML
}

🔗 Links:

Chrome Developer Tools https://developers.google.com/web/tools/chrome-devtools/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hey, there measuregeeks! Julian here back with another quick tip video. Today, we want to talk about how we can utilize the Chrome dev tools to build a custom JavaScript variable that can pull out any value from the document object model. So for example, if I wanted to pull out this product name here, how could I transfer this into Google Tag Manager? Now, the obvious way is to utilize a data layer. This is the most reliable and standard way to send data into Google Tag Manager. But if you don’t have a developer at hand, or can install a data layer, you might want to utilize the scraping method. And this is the method of pulling out values directly from the document object model. And this comes with some downsides. Because if the site changes in any way, your variables and with that the data might not work anymore, and it’s not as consistent. So just be aware once you utilize this method and no of the downside.

So how can we pull this in with the help of the Chrome Dev Tools? Simply go to the element that you want to pull in, we have the inspect button on the right click that you can click. It will open up the developer tools in the elements pane. Now, here we have the element that we have selected. If you right click on this title, we can go to copy and click on copy JS path. Once we have clicked on JS path, we can go over to console and try this all out. What this will do and I’ve just pasted it in, it will give us a document query selector. And here we have the selector that should pull in the title right here. So if you click enter, you see that we now have this whole element that this JavaScript command pulls it. Now, what we want to get from this is actually the name here in between. And we can append a simple dot inner HTML to get what is in between the HTML tags. This is what we want to pull into Google Tag Manager. But before we go the next step, actually want to go to another page here and try this command out again. I’m just going to click the up arrow to get the last command back and press ENTER again, and we get an error. And this is probably because our query selector so what the tools have selected here is too specific to the page that we had earlier, and it cannot pull out the next product name. And this is probably because there is a product ID of 73 defined here. What we can do is to get rid of this 73 part.

Press Enter again. And here we go, we have now our Ninja. Let’s go on to the next page, see if we can get the right product in there. So it’s very important to test your scraping methods with different use cases. So you know that they work correctly. So here we go, we should be able to reliably pull this out, even if we have different other products in front of us. So now we can go ahead and copy this command right here and go over to Google Tag Manager and build a new custom JavaScript variable. This will be your custom JavaScript variable for our product title. And we’re going to go ahead and utilize the custom JavaScript variable. Now, we will need to fill this with first of all an anonymous function right here with a return statement that needs to be inside. And here we can post our text that we have copied earlier. Let’s try this all out. Save this and preview.

It’s important to know that these scraping methods normally only work on the DOM ready. So once the DOM has loaded, we’ll be able to retrieve custom product title, not on the pageview. But here, it’s already alright on a pageview apparently. Let’s go over to another product.

And see here we have happy ninja. This is the product name. If we have another product here, you can see that it pulls in the right product name. So this is how you can utilize this method of right clicking and copying the JS path. You can build a custom JavaScript variable with the help of the Chrome Dev Tools and Google Tag Manager.

Hey, there it’s me again. Thanks for checking out our quick tip video. Was that helpful? Did you understand something not quite? Then I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. But if you liked it, then why not give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian. Til next time.

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5 Data Studio Functions for Calculated Fields you should know

Calculated Fields in Google Data Studio let you create and add custom metrics or dimensions to your data set. You can utilize Formulas to calculate your fields just like in Google Sheets. Today I’m going to show you 5 Functions you should know.

🔗 Links:

All Functions: https://support.google.com/datastudio/table/6379764?hl=en

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, I’m going to show you the five formulas you need to know in Data Studio to build your calculated fields. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measure geeks. Julian here back with another video teaching you the data-driven way of Digital Marketing. Today we want to talk about Data Studio again. And Data Studio is really interesting because it’s always evolving, it’s a pretty new tool. So there’s always new features. And recently, they’ve added formulas to the mix. Now with formulas, you can actually upgrade your game when you build a calculated field in Data Studio. This is something that we all know from Google Sheets. We probably use the sum function or the average function sometimes to add up fields or a row of data. In Data Studio, you can actually add now to your data set with calculated fields and utilize formulas event. And today, I want to show you five of these formulas that you should utilize in your calculated fields. Now, we got lots to cover so let’s dive in.

All right, let’s start out in Google Data Studio, looking at what formulas actually are. So if you have a chart, you can use formulas and input formulas in two ways. One is on a chart basis itself by adding a metric or dimension right here, then creating a field. And here you can see you can enter a formula to calculate that particular field. But this is then only available within this chart. If you want to make it available within the data source, you need to create a new field down here. And it will open up the Create new field editor where we can also enter our formula. So let’s get started with our first formula. If you have an example just like this one where you have sources that are kind of the same, but as you can see, we have different uses of Facebook and Google here with capitalization, without capitalization, and so on. So these really screw up our numbers, as we know that all of these should actually be Facebook.com.

Now, we can utilize a formula to calculate a new field that simply takes this dimension and makes a new one with all lower case sources. So let’s create this. We go to create new field, and this will all be our lower case source. And as a formula, we’ll use our lower formula to simply use our source field as an input field. And once we get a green checkmark down here, everything should be good to go. Save this and edit to our chart right here. And you see the input was taken from the source field, and then rewritten in lower case. And this is the case for every variation now here. So if you get rid of the source field have a much smaller, much more readable data set that we can now visualize appropriately. So the lower or even the upper formula can be used to lowercase or capitalized strings text and rewrite them in a new dimension. Let’s move on to the second formula. This is our concat formula.

You might be familiar with a case like this, where we have your page path, especially if you have multiple domains attached to your Google Analytics account, for example, it might be a bit deceiving. So let’s add here, our hostname to this dimension. And as we see it actually splits it up and shows us that, for example, the homepage belongs to different subdomains right here. So what if we wanted to actually combine both of these so we have a more understandable data set. Or we can do this with text as well, by creating a new field. And using the formula of concatenate a call this full URL and will simply use the concatenate formula which has concat as an input field, it takes the hostname and the page path. Here we go. Let’s save this. And look at our result. We have our full URL here, pull that in. And now we can see what’s in between right now

let’s put this down here. This plus this equals this new full-page path.

And again, we can get rid of our other dimensions and just have the full path for our understandable data. So concatenate is another formula you can use with text in order to string together different text dimension values into one. Let’s move on to the next example, which is regex extract. So an example here would be that you have a page path, which is clearly the search of your website. And in the back of the URL, you have this Q equals parameter, and afterward the search string that was used on your website. Now, this clearly shows the search. But to make it all more readable, why not pull out and extract the search query and put into a separate report. Again, here, we can use a formula. Let’s go ahead and create a new field, which is our search term. And here we’re going to use the regex extract formula, which takes a field as an input, which is our page path. And then our regular expression, you would need to learn a little bit of regex in order to be able to use this correctly. But it’s well worth learning. I won’t get into it right now. But it has many use cases and data analysis. So definitely look into regex, we have a separate video on this as well on the channel, the regex that we will use here is simply looking for the Q equals.

And then using a capture group to pull out anything that is in the back of this capture group that should do it. Let’s save this and have a look at how this works. As we can see has now pulled out these search terms from our page path. And we can get rid of our page path variable to have a nice search term report. Moving on. Next up our regex match. And this is a search query report for a language learning website. As you might expect, users are often searching for the target language that they want to learn. But there are some more hidden key phrases that reveal that more about what the users up to. So if you go here into the view, and look down here, maybe you can find one of those How are you was actually something you need to really dig through. But here, for example, why French is… Why French is not as hard as you think, interesting. These search terms that start with why, what, when, where are oftentimes more telling about what the user actually wants, and might give us some ideas on future content generation, or keywords that you might want to book in Google Ads. So let’s try to pull them out and actually filter them out. There are different methods of doing so. But a formula that you can use here is the regex match option.

Let’s try it out. We go over to create a new field. And we’ll try to pull out our what, when, where and so on questions. We’ll utilize the regex match formula.

As an input, we take our query string and type in the regular expression to detect whether there is what when aware inside of the text.

And you do this by separating it with the all functionality, which is a pipe so why, how, when, where, who or which. Now, since these words can appear in any order at the beginning or the end or in the middle, I’m gonna also prefix them with a dot star, which means if as long as they couldn’t, in the sentence, we should be able to pick this up.

There we go. Let’s save this and add this to our sheet. Now what this reg ex match option does it spits out a false or true. And in this case, all of these are false. But we should be able to find one or two of these trues. Let’s see here we have a true for how to learn French. Now this field can actually be used for a filter. So there are a lot of different ways of filtering data. But now that we have that new column, let’s use it for filter, simply filter out our w questions. And we only want to include when, what, where equals true, let’s save this.

And voila, we get our list filter down to these terms like this a bit larger. So we’ll be able to see this. But we don’t actually need to have this column right here, we could also take it out and only look at this data and call this the one where report. So the regex match option can be used to classify and search through strings of data. And then it could be used for example for filter. Or, as we can see in the next example, for bit more sophisticated filtering, which brings us to our last formula, which is probably the most used one is the case formula. This is a very popular and also very powerful formula. Here we have the same report as before. But this time, we’ll use the case formula to build a more dynamic filter that we can utilize with a dynamic chart, let me show you what I mean.

Now the case formula is really a if this, then that formula, we will call this w class. And our case formula always starts with a very succinct syntax. And it starts with a case keyword and follows with when clauses. So when x happens, then do y. And you can have multiple of these conditions in here. But at the end, you might want to have an else clause, which would then say, if none of the above are true, then just put this one in place. And all everything is ended with the end clause. So this is the syntax of a case formula. And let’s fill this out right now. What do we want to happen? Well, on the first classification, we would like to use our reg ex match option again, to filter by our query. And this time, we only put in as a reg ex our who question for example, and when the who is found in the string, then I would like to classify it as who question mark. Now, we can do this with all the different w questions.

So we would have why, and so on. And at the end, if none of them are true, we just put this as others. Now, let me fill this out really quickly here. So here we have all our questions in here now, why, how, when, what where, and it shows green. Let’s update this. And now put our new dimension in the report. And we should see if we put this in the right order. We now have the how questions, the why questions, all classified in different categories. So it’s kind of the same as we have a true or false but it’s more categories. Now, how can this be useful? Well, if we duplicate this, and now get rid of our query right here, we only left with the y which our categories that we imported in to our custom dimension. Now, there is a feature within Data Studio that actually lets us use this table as a filter. How can you classify this as a filter? Well, there’s an option down here on the interactions apply filter.

And now if you have this in your report, you can click on any of these. And then it will filter the whole report page based on this data point if it’s within the same data set. So now our report on the left side is filtered based on what we have clicked on. So if you go to why, which great for exploration of these when, why, how and so on questions that oftentimes appear in search things. Now there are many other use cases for the case formula. But in general, if you want to classify something and aggregated together, you might want to use the case formula for this purpose. Use Cases might be general grouping or content grouping. And, importantly, you can do this retroactively. So even if your data set doesn’t provide the channel grouping, by default, you can go in and edit in later. So case formula is really a powerful tool within Data Studio to have available for your data visualization.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can utilize the five formulas in your Data Studio calculated fields. Did I forget any of the formulas that you oftentimes use in your Data Studio dashboards? Then please let me know in the comments down below. And as always, if you liked this video, why not give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to the channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian till next time.

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Most Important Chart Types in Google Data Studio (feat. Ahmad Kanani)

Google Data Studio has several chart types thus allow users to create and design their reports in unlimited ways. In today’s video, Ahmad of Siavak is back, this time to show us the 6 most significant charts in data studio. Plus, he will give us some tips and tricks on how to design your data visualization dashboards more efficiently.

🔗 Links:

Siavak – http://siavak.com/

Google Data Studio – https://datastudio.google.com/

Chart Types Reference – https://support.google.com/datastudio/answer/7398001

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, Ahmad is going to introduce you to the most important chart types within Data Studio. And he’s going to give you some tricks on how to build more effective dashboards in Data Studio. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measure geeks. Julian here back with another video for you. Today, we want to talk about Data Studio and data visualizations. Now, you’re seeing we are remodeling right now our little studio here and I’m thinking what should I put in the background? Let me know in the comments down below. Today, we gonna talk about Data Studio. And this is a quite new tool in a Google universe. So it’s always evolving further and further. There’s always stuff I learned from different people. And today we want to learn from Ahmad who’s going to show us the different chart types within Data Studio. He’s also going to give us his tricks on how to become more effective in building a dashboard. He’s actually going to build a very small dashboard in this video

in a very short amount of time. Now we got lots to cover. So Ahmad take it away. Thanks, Julian. This is Ahmad from Siovak. And today I’m gonna show you 6 useful charts in Google Data Studio and we are gonna create this simple report dashboard together. Okay, let’s begin. First, I’m going to create a new blank Data Studio report. And I’m going to create a new data source for it. For this tutorial, we’re going to use Google Analytics and we are going to connect to Google Analytics demo account.

Let’s choose the Master View. And connect. It takes a few seconds, and then you can add it to your report. Click Add to report. And we are ready to go. The first data visualization side we’re going to create is a scorecard. Scorecard is best to show KPIs with key performance indicators. To do this, let’s go and add a chart. Choose a scorecard.

Resize it a bit and position it our canvas. As you can see the scorecard chose a metric, we can change the metric, for example, to sessions.

We can drag and drop sessions over page views for it to change. We can see the date range of this metric. So this is the number of sessions over the last 28 days. And we can also have a comparison to the previous year, previous period, or a custom time period. I’m going to choose previous period and hit apply. We can also filter the scorecard to show the number of sessions only for segments of our audience. To do this, we can add a filter.

Let’s for example, say viewers only say country equal to United States. Hit Save. Now it reloads to reflect the number of sessions from users from United States. We can also change the name and title of the metric to US only sessions. So it’s clear what’s number is a scorecard is going to represent. Let’s revert it back to default. And remove the filter. Because I’m going to show you at the end of this video, a really cool trick and a new feature of Data Studio that is actually more useful. The scorecard right now is pretty basic. So the next thing I’m going to do is to apply a bit of a styling to the scorecard. We can go to the style tab, choose a background and border and border radius. For background, we can use a solid color, or you can use a gradient from top left to bottom right. And let’s choose from white to a light gray.

Let’s change the border radius to four and add a light gray border as well. Okay, this looks much better. Now let’s copy and paste it to create three more scorecards. So control C and control V to create another one. For this, I’m going to show revenue.

For the next one, I’m going to show transactions. And for the final one, I’m going to show e-commerce conversion rate.

That’s it. Now, let’s say we want to see the trend of sessions over the time period of last 28 days. This is only the total number. But if you want to see the trend, we can use another data visualization chart, which is a trend line. We can either add a trend line or time series directly from the menu. But because I want to keep this styling, I can do this from another way. Let’s see, I can copy and paste this to create a new one. As you can see, the metric is still sessions and the comparison time period is set. I make it a bit bigger to come here to this menu and change the type of the chart from a scorecard to time series chart. That’s it. So we have our time series here, which we can adjust. It’s already showing sessions during the timeframe of last 28 days. Now let’s create another type of visualization that shows us the top five acquisition channels that send traffic to this website during last 28 days. I’m going to copy and paste again because I want to keep this styling. And now I’m going to change the charts type from time series to a horizontal bar chart. Let’s close this. And for the dimension, I want to use default channel grouping,

which is the acquisition channel for these sessions. I want to sort it not based on the name of the default channel grouping, but based on the number of sessions descending. And then in this time tab, I can choose to show only the top five channels. Now I’m going to make it a bit smaller and resize it a bit. That’s it, we know the number of sessions, we can see the trend of sessions over time. And we can see the top channels that have been sending these users to our website. Now let’s say we want to know the geography of and the countries that are sending traffic to this website. I can copy and paste this again, resize it a bit to make it bigger. And then I can change the type to a geo map. The dimension automatically changes to show the country and in shows the number of sessions per country based on you know the shade of the blue color. The darker the country, it means the more sessions we had from this country. The next chart I want to create is an area chart. An area chart helps us to see both the channel contribution to the traffic and the trend of users over time, we already know what to do copy, paste. And the reason for copy pasting is just simply retaining the styling. Otherwise, you can come here and add a area chart quite easily. And once here, we can change it to this area chart. For the time dimension we’re using date, of course. And for the breakdown dimension, we’re going to use the default channel grouping.

Here, we can also go to this style tab and change the number of series to five. Because we want this to match to the bar chart above. As you can see, we can now see boosted trend of sessions over time, and also the distribution of the default channel grouping per date. Next, let’s see some demographic data. We’re going to use a pie chart to show the ratio of male and female users to this website. Let’s copy and paste the bar chart and change it either to a pie chart or a donut chart. They’re basically the same, they only look different I like the donut chart. Let’s make it a bit ticker. And in data, let’s choose gender as the dimension of this pie chart. Now also, I’d like to come to the style tab and change the position of the legend. That’s it. Congratulations our simple dashboard is ready. We can preview the dashboard. Or you can also share it with your client or the end user. If they hover on any piece of the pie, or bar, or any data into the top online, or any country, they can see the actual number of sessions or any other metrics that you have on your visualization. But other than that, it’s a static report, they cannot interact with it. So if they click, nothing happens, it’s basically stays the same. So now it’s time for the cool trick that I promised to show you. Let’s go back to edit mode, we want to make this dashboard a bit more interactive. Let’s start by making the pie chart interactive. You can select the visualization widget. And on the Data tab at the end, we have interactions, and we can choose it to apply filter. Now let’s see how it behaves. Now that we’ve enabled the interactions for this pie chart, if we hover and click on any piece of the pie, every other widget in this dashboard will get updated to show us the data for that segment only. Let’s try. Now every other widget on this dashboard is updated to only show the number of sessions for male users. We can click again to reset it and go back to default. Now let’s go back to edit mode and enable interactions for the rest of the widgets, for the map, for the area chart and for the timeline. And so we have a totally interactive report dashboard. We can click on organic search to see data all for organic search which is coming up with an error. I don’t know why. We can click back to reset, we can click on the US to only see the other data for US users, just like what we did with the manual filter or the sessions at the beginning, and then can click back to return it. We can also apply two or more filters at the same time. So let’s say female users from United States. Let’s click again and reset. So we have two types of filtering and a report interaction Data Studio. The first one is filtering which is clicking on a segment on a graph to filter the rest of the widgets on the same report dashboard. The second one is called brushing, which is the selection of a time period on a chart like time series on an area chart to update the rest of the widgets in the same document to only represent the data for that time period. You can select the date, or any time period that you want.

That’s it. So to recap, today, we learned about six most useful charts and Data Studio and how to use them to create a simple report dashboard like this and it looks good and beautiful as well. We bring scorecards, time series, bar charts, area charts, a map and a pie or donut chart. Plus, we learn how to make our dashboard interactive for the end user. Now it’s your turn, go make some cool dashboards and share the links in the comments section. Thanks for watching and good luck.

All right, so there you have it. Thanks Ahmad for this quick introduction to the different chart types and how you have actually built this dashboard in such a short amount of time. I’m still amazed by this trick of duplicating your data visualizations and then there’s changing the chart types so you don’t have to do all the styling over again. Something I will keep in mind the next time I build a dashboard. What have you taken away from the video? I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. And if you haven’t yet, then maybe consider subscribing right over there to the channel because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian.

See you in the next one.

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3 ways to use the google_tag_manager JavaScript object

google_tag_manager is the magic command to access the GTM object in your JavaScript. With it you can access the internal data model GTM and access what is currently in the dataLayer through JavaScript. In this video I’m going to show 3 advanced ways how you can utilize the GTM object in your tag deployment.

Commands used:

google_tag_manager[“GTM-XXXXX”].dataLayer.get(“DLKEY”)

google_tag_manager[“GTM-XXXXX”].dataLayer.get(“gtm.element”).getAttribute(“ATTRIBUTENAME”)

google_tag_manager[“GTM-XXXXX”].dataLayer.get(“gtm.element”).matches(“CSSSELECTOR”)

🔗 Links:

Google Tag Manager’s Data Model (Simo Ahava): https://www.simoahava.com/analytics/google-tag-manager-data-model/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

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How to link Google Ads to Google Analytics [Quick Tip]

Connection Google Ads to Google Analytics let’s you get better data in GA, let’s you built audiences directly from your custom segments and enables conversion tracking. Learn how you can connect Google Ads and Google Analytics with these quick and simple steps.

🔗 Links:

https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/1704341

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hello there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. And in this video, I’m going to show you how you can connect your Google Ads account to your Google Analytics account. So let’s dive right in. Why would you actually want to do this? If you connect your Google Ads to your Google Analytics account, you will get much better data. So for example, here, if your accounts are connected, you will be able to get data about, for example, your keywords that will use to visit your website. This is not possible if you have Google Analytics and Google Ads running in parallel, but they are not linked. So you get enhanced reporting if you connect accounts. You will furthermore be able to build retargeting audiences of your segments.

So if you have any kind of segments that you have built in your Google Analytics account, you can go ahead and build an audience of these segments without dropping any kind of pixel on your website in order to really target people. And awesome example is this e-commerce report here, do you have that setup, you can build an audience of everybody who dropped off the cart. And then you’ll be able to build an audience of that and send these users right back into your Google Ads account to be retargeted. And of course, you will be able to utilize any kind of goal conversions that you have as conversion tracking within your Google Ads account. So you’ll be able to set up conversion tracking base of the goals that you have set up in Google Analytics. So how do you connect both accounts?

First of all, you need to make sure that you are logged in with the same email address, the same Google account that you are logged in with your Google Analytics account. So right here we have both accounts are the same, then we need to make sure that we have the right access. So in Google Ads, go over to your tools. And then in your account access, you need to have administrative account access level set up with your email address. If that’s the case, go over to Google Analytics and check here as well, go over to your admin section. And then under the property settings, under user management, you need to have edit access to this account, then you will be able to connect accounts. And it’s simple as clicking on the Google Ads linking button here in the property settings. And then if you’re logged in to the right account, you will see here, your Google Ads account ID. And that’s the same account ID that you want to connect. So we simply click here and then continue, then we can choose an account name. So for example,

that way, if you have multiple accounts that you connect to your Google Ads account, you can know where this is coming from. And then you choose the views that you want to connect and where you want to pull data from. In our case, that will just be the master view. I have three views here set up which is best practice. But you can choose any view that you want to pull the data from. You can even choose multiple here. And last but not least, you can enable auto-tagging, this is the setting that pulls in all that data from your Google Ads account into Google Analytics. So I would recommend to enable this auto-tagging feature unless you have a good reason.

Like for example, you are utilizing UTM tags, and don’t want to mix it up with the auto-tagging feature. But in most cases, I would recommend to use auto-tagging, in order to pull in all that data into Google Analytics as well. And then you simply click on link accounts. And your accounts are now linked. As it’s described here, you will be able to see more data in your Google Ads and Google Analytics account, you will be able to import goals and ecommerce conversions and also build remarketing audiences of your segmentation feature in Google Analytics. So this is how you link your Google Ads account to your Google Analytics.

Hey, there it’s me again. Thanks for checking out our quick tip video. Was that helpful? Did you understand something not quite? Then I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. But if you liked it, then why not give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian, til next time.

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