How to link Google Ads to Google Analytics [Quick Tip]

Connection Google Ads to Google Analytics let’s you get better data in GA, let’s you built audiences directly from your custom segments and enables conversion tracking. Learn how you can connect Google Ads and Google Analytics with these quick and simple steps.

🔗 Links:

https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/1704341

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hello there and welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. And in this video, I’m going to show you how you can connect your Google Ads account to your Google Analytics account. So let’s dive right in. Why would you actually want to do this? If you connect your Google Ads to your Google Analytics account, you will get much better data. So for example, here, if your accounts are connected, you will be able to get data about, for example, your keywords that will use to visit your website. This is not possible if you have Google Analytics and Google Ads running in parallel, but they are not linked. So you get enhanced reporting if you connect accounts. You will furthermore be able to build retargeting audiences of your segments.

So if you have any kind of segments that you have built in your Google Analytics account, you can go ahead and build an audience of these segments without dropping any kind of pixel on your website in order to really target people. And awesome example is this e-commerce report here, do you have that setup, you can build an audience of everybody who dropped off the cart. And then you’ll be able to build an audience of that and send these users right back into your Google Ads account to be retargeted. And of course, you will be able to utilize any kind of goal conversions that you have as conversion tracking within your Google Ads account. So you’ll be able to set up conversion tracking base of the goals that you have set up in Google Analytics. So how do you connect both accounts?

First of all, you need to make sure that you are logged in with the same email address, the same Google account that you are logged in with your Google Analytics account. So right here we have both accounts are the same, then we need to make sure that we have the right access. So in Google Ads, go over to your tools. And then in your account access, you need to have administrative account access level set up with your email address. If that’s the case, go over to Google Analytics and check here as well, go over to your admin section. And then under the property settings, under user management, you need to have edit access to this account, then you will be able to connect accounts. And it’s simple as clicking on the Google Ads linking button here in the property settings. And then if you’re logged in to the right account, you will see here, your Google Ads account ID. And that’s the same account ID that you want to connect. So we simply click here and then continue, then we can choose an account name. So for example,

that way, if you have multiple accounts that you connect to your Google Ads account, you can know where this is coming from. And then you choose the views that you want to connect and where you want to pull data from. In our case, that will just be the master view. I have three views here set up which is best practice. But you can choose any view that you want to pull the data from. You can even choose multiple here. And last but not least, you can enable auto-tagging, this is the setting that pulls in all that data from your Google Ads account into Google Analytics. So I would recommend to enable this auto-tagging feature unless you have a good reason.

Like for example, you are utilizing UTM tags, and don’t want to mix it up with the auto-tagging feature. But in most cases, I would recommend to use auto-tagging, in order to pull in all that data into Google Analytics as well. And then you simply click on link accounts. And your accounts are now linked. As it’s described here, you will be able to see more data in your Google Ads and Google Analytics account, you will be able to import goals and ecommerce conversions and also build remarketing audiences of your segmentation feature in Google Analytics. So this is how you link your Google Ads account to your Google Analytics.

Hey, there it’s me again. Thanks for checking out our quick tip video. Was that helpful? Did you understand something not quite? Then I’d love to hear from you in the comments down below. But if you liked it, then why not give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian, til next time.

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How to install Google Tag Manager on Wix (feat. Mike Sale)

Wix is a popular website builder that makes website building easy. But what about website tracking? If you install Google Tag Manager you should be able to quickly take your tracking to the next level. In this video Mike is going to show you how to install GTM on a Wix website.

🔗 Links:

Sign up to Wix – https://www.wix.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, Mike is going to show you how you can install Google Tag Manager on a Wix website. All and more coming up.

Hello there. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. But today we have Mike Sale from michaelsale.com on this channel to show us how we can install Google Tag Manager on to a Wix website. Now spoiler alert, you will need to have an upgraded account in order to do this. But if you’re serious about building your website on the Wix system then you’ve probably done this already. Now, Mike is actually gonna show us in multiple videos how you can then take the next steps of installing Google Analytics, Facebook Ads, or the tracking for Google Ads on to this account. So definitely subscribe to this channel down below because there are new videos coming out every week. Now we got lots to cover. So Mike, take it away.

Hello, Julian, thank you very much. Hi, everyone. This is Mike from Michaelsale.com. And we’re going to show you today how to install Google Tag Manager on your Wix website. So to do that, we need to validate two key prerequisites from your Wix.com account perspective. So you need to go into your site dashboard, and validate that you have a plan here a premium plan, or basically a plan that does not say free, if it says free. Under this location, you’re going to need to upgrade your plan. It can be the smallest lowest that you could possibly have. But it just needs to be not free. The other one is that you need to have your domain connected. Your domain is your website address like for example, Michaelsale.com, or in this case, Michael.sale, it will handle anything in terms of domains, like for example, that .com .net, .gov, .org,

all those will work just fine. Once those two prerequisites within Wix are met, you need to go to tagmanager.Google.com. In TagManager.Google.com will require that you actually have a Google account, that Google account will be used to login and create a business account or a company account within Google Tag Manager. So to do that, we’re going to go ahead and click Create Account. And this is where I’m going to put in my company name.

And then I’m going to go ahead and create a container, that container is your site. In this case, it’s going to be Michael.sale, right? And what kind of container will you need for your Wix website? Well, guess what? It’s a web container, no big shocks there. Let’s go ahead and make sure that we select web container. And that will now allow us to create both our account that’s our company, as well as our container which is our website.

We now have to go ahead and select the terms of service agreement.

And now Google tells us that we need to install Google Tag Manager by copying and pasting in some code into our website. Wix has a special integration just for Wix that allows you to only take the container ID and copy that.

You can also find that tag that container ID right here. And we’re going to go back over to Wix.

Now that we’ve got both our tag manager container setup and our Wix connected domain, and premium plan, we can go over to where it says marketing tools. Under marketing tools down at the bottom, you will see marketing integrations. Under marketing integrations, you’ll see Google Analytics Facebook Pixel, Google Tag Manager. Google Tag Manager allows us to manage all of these other tags and more beyond what may be set up for marketing integrations within your Wix website. So we’re going to use Google Tag Manager to do that. So we’re going to connect Google Tag Manager, as you see up in the upper right. Click that and it will ask you for your tag manager ID basically your container ID. We’re going to paste that in and hit save. Now,

our Wix website is connected to that particular container. What that means is that that snippet of code Wix is actually taken that snippet of code and put it into place for us on our Wix website.

Now, we need to validate and understand if we actually have that Tag Manager properly installed on our website. So right now this is this is the plain Jane website that I’ve set up just for this demonstration.

And we’re going to go into a special mode that allows us to see

what it would be like if we were to publish this particular setup or this initialization on our website. So to do so we’re going to go ahead and go into preview mode. Preview mode is exclusive to this particular web browser. So now what we’re going to need to do now we’re in preview mode, we’re going to go back over to our website, and we’re going to do a hard reset. So we’re going to go ahead and reload the page.

And what will pop up at the bottom here is the Tag Manager preview window. This allows us to look not just at whether or not we’ve installed Google Tag Manager. But have we set up the tags within Google Tag Manager correctly and are they firing where we expect to fire them at what events we have all that good information. So understanding this will show you that there are no tags. But we can go ahead and set that up right now in Google Tag Manager. The other way we can validate and verify this is using something called the tag assistant. This is a Google Chrome assistant, Google Chrome extension. And Google Tag assistant will actually tell you Yep, when I look at this, and this is only in the preview mode, I can actually see that this is up and running, that Tag Manager is there. And it does not currently have any tags but the Tag Manager is installed. And you can see that this is the code snippet.

And we can now go back and turn off preview mode or leave preview mode.

When we do that, what you’ll find is if you go back over to our website, and we reloaded again,

you’ll see that the Google Tag assistant first of all the window down below that tells us about what things would be like if we were to publish this container is gone. And number two, you’ll see that Google Tag Manager is there. But it is it’s it’s not quite correctly set up something’s wrong.

So we need to go over to Google Tag Manager. And we need to publish or submit our container. So now that we’ve seen it in preview mode, everything is working as we expect, we’re going to go to submit this particular container. And in this case, we’re just going to initialize the install of Google Tag Manager.

You can put anything you want here in the description of what it is. And when we hit Publish.

Now, we’ll see that we have this version that has been published. Tells you when, there are no tags installed yet. We can install tags for Google Analytics.

You can see those tags right here. Google Analytics, Google Ads, remarketing. There’s also not just google tags, but for example, the

Facebook Pixel, LinkedIn, and a variety of different tags that have nothing to do with Google whatsoever. We’re not going to do that yet. We’ll do that in a subsequent video, we just want to verify that the live version of Google Tag Manager is now running on our Wix website. So we’re going to come back over to our website, do another hard refresh. And now what you could see is the Google Chrome tag assistant is showing us that we do have the Google Tag Manager is now in a green state and is working properly.

Next, we will need to go ahead and add new tags, for example, Google Analytics. And Julian, I know that you have plenty of videos and tutorials that will help people understand how to do that. So at this point, I’m going to go ahead and hand it back off to you. Thanks, everyone, Mike from MichaelSale.com signing off. Bye.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can install Google Tag Manager on a Wix website. Thank you, Mike for explaining this to us. And if you want to follow along with the next videos that are going to come out in the series, then definitely subscribe to our channel right over there. Now, my name is Julian. See you in the next one.

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Delay Facebook Pixel with Google Tag Manager (feat. Ahmad Kanani)

Delaying the Facebook Pixel from firing when the user enters the website will have the effect of filtering out any user who isn’t really interested in what you have to offer. We can implement such a delay with the help of Google Tag Manager. In this video we’re going to find out how.

🔗 Links:

Timer Trigger for Google Tag Manager: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7gqv7ASSAE

How to Build a Scroll + Timer Trigger with Google Tag Manager https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71pCKRouabc

Siavak – http://siavak.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, Ahmad is going to show you how you can delay your Facebook pixel to build a higher quality audience in your Facebook ads. All and more coming up.

Hello there. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian. But today we have Ahmad from Siavak.com on the channel. He is the web analytics specialist there. And he’s going to show us how we can refine our Facebook audience by delaying our Facebook pixel. So in the end, we have a higher quality audience to do for example retargeting to. Now, we got lots to cover. So Ahmad take it away.

Thanks, Julian. My name is Ahmad and I’m the web analytics especially sets your work. Today I’m going to create a Facebook audience of people who have stayed at least five seconds on my webpage. The reason I’m doing that is because it gives me a better quality audience by excluding those who have clicked on a link by mistake or just closed the page immediately and didn’t have the chance to even look at the page or see the branding or see the offer on the page. We can use this audience for retargeting purposes. And hopefully we can get better results by advertising to a better quality audience.

Let’s begin by creating our base Facebook tag. For this, let’s go to tag manager and create a new custom HTML tag. I’m clicking on the tag, new, and then see HTML for custom HTML, and then Facebook based pixel. Now,

I use the custom HTML as a tag type and copy paste my code, my pixel code from Facebook to the tag itself. Now, I want the Facebook base tag to fire immediately on all pages. So I set the trigger to all pages and safety Facebook base pixel. That was easy was it. Let’s preview the tag and see how it actually performs on our website.

Now, Google Tag Manager is in preview mode. And we can go back to our website and refresh the page. As you can see, our custom HTML Facebook based pixel has fired one time. And here in my Facebook pixel helper, I can also see that the page view of its my pixel has been fired.

Now, let’s create a custom some events for this Facebook pixel that fires five seconds after the page load. For this, let’s go to Google Tag Manager. And first of all create a trigger. We want to create a trigger that fires five seconds after the page load. Luckily for us, there is a built in trigger inside Google Tag Manager which is a timer trigger. We can choose the trigger type as timer, put the interval, which is 5000 milliseconds which is equals five seconds, and then limit it to fire only once. If we put 10 here, this trigger fires every five seconds for 10 times, but we only needed to fire once. Now, we need to set the conditions for this trigger. We want this trigger to fire on all pages. That’s why I’m going to set whenever the page path matches regular expression.star. And .star in regular expression means basically everything. Okay, so this time a trigger fires just once after five seconds on all pages.

Let’s give it a name, timer five seconds and save it. Now, we have our timer. Let’s go to tag and create a tag that fires the Facebook event. Tags a new tag. Again, this is a custom HTML tag for Facebook and it fires after five seconds.

For the tag configuration, we choose the custom HTML tag type. And here we need to type exactly like this. First of all, because it’s a piece of JavaScript, and then fbq track custom because it’s a custom event that we’ve created. It’s not one of the standard Facebook events. And we can name it whatever we want. In this case, let’s use five seconds, so we can identify in Facebook ads interface. Now, we’re going to link this tag to the trigger that we’ve just built. So this piece of code fires five seconds after each page load. Let’s save it.

And let’s preview our container. We can either hit preview button here, or hit refresh while we’re on the preview mode. Now, let’s go back to the website and refresh the page.

As you can see, we only have the Facebook base pixel. And then just after five seconds, this new tag fires. If we look at the page view, we can see that the base pixel and these other tag they fired on the page view but five seconds after that GTM timer has fired and with that our five seconds tag has fired. If you check the Facebook pixel however, we can also see that page view has fired and also our five seconds new event.

Now that we have created our events and pixel base pixel, and we are seeing that they are firing and Facebook pixel helper is showing that they’re firing. We also need to go to Facebook to ensure that Facebook is receiving these events. Now here in Facebook events manager, I’m in the test Events tab. Okay. And as you can see, it’s receiving activity, it’s receiving page views. And it’s also receiving five seconds events. If I clear the activity and refresh this page again, and come back here. We can see in real time that first it received the page view. And after five seconds, it receives our five seconds event. Ok.

Now, the final piece that we need to ensure is to come to Google Tag Manager. And for our Facebook base pixel said something names tag firing proceed because we always want our base pixel which contains the initiation part of the Facebook pixel to happen before any other events that we send afterwards. We need to click on Advanced setting and give a higher number like 10 to detect firing priority and then saved the tag.

Any tag with higher priority fires before any other tag with lower priority. So in this case, our base pixel always fires before our event because this is just a piece of code that needs the initiation pixel to be there in order to perform.

Now that we have our tag and triggers set up properly, we can go back to our Facebook Ads Manager within the Facebook pixel interface and create create audiences.

We choose the accounts, we choose the pixel. And then we can choose to create an audience of people who have stayed for more than five seconds for at least five seconds. And then we can set for how many days do we want this audience go. So the people who have stayed for five years seconds in the last seven days. You can give the audience a name and save it.

That’s it. Now it’s time for you to go and try it out yourself. Thank you for watching. Bye.

All right, so there you have it. This is how you can delay your Facebook pixel to in the end build a higher quality audience. Now if you liked this video, then definitely give us a thumbs up and also subscribe to our channel right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian til next time.

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Cross-Domain Tracking with Google Tag Manager

Cross Domain Tracking for Google Analytics needs to be installed if you have two separate domains you want to connect to one Google Analytics account. We will utilize GTM to install this on our website and test if it’s working.

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

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Google Ads Website Call Conversion Tracking with GTM

Call Extensions are extra snippets you can add to your paid Google Ads to display a phone number directly on the ad. But what if the user comes to the page and sees a different ad? You can use the Website Call Conversion Tracking feature to automatically change around the number on your website so it displays the number the user saw on the ad and that way transfer conversion information to Google Ads. In this video, I’m going to show you how to accomplish this with GTM.

🔗 Links:

Google Help: https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/6095882?co=ADWORDS.IsAWNCustomer%3Dfalse&hl=en

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/measureschool
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

In this video, I’m going to show you how you can install the call conversion tracking feature of Google Ads onto your website with the help of Google Tag Manager. All and more coming up.

Hey, there measure geeks, Julian here back with another video for you guys. On this channel, we do all about data analytics and marketing. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing down below. Today, we want to talk about the call conversion tracking feature of Google Ads and how to install this on to our website. Now, what is this called conversion tracking feature? If you have a search result, just like on a search result in Google on your mobile phone, you might notice that there’s a phone number that you can actually click and then are connected to the advertiser directly. But what if the user clicks on the search result then goes to the website and you have a different phone number displayed there, but Google Ads gives us a call conversion tracking code for our website that can change this dynamically. So it mimics whatever is on the ad, we just have to install it. And today, I’m going to show you how to do this with the help of Google Tag Manager. So fire up your Google Tag Manager and your ads account. And we’re going to get started right now.

Welcome back to our demo shop on this demo shop, I have installed a phone number right here that can be called by our customers. And if the customer actually goes through Google AdWords and comes to the page, he might have seen an ad just like this one, where there is a call extension feature. So the user can click on this button and then be connected with us right away, these features can be installed, they are not available for every country. But if you go into your Google Ads account on the ad extensions, you can look, if you are able to install them right here, you can create a call extension, this will give you a number by Google, which will then connect right to your phone.

And if the user calls through Google while he’s still on Google, this can be counted as a conversion. Now obviously, if the user clicks on the ad itself and comes to our page, he will be greeted with a completely different version of the number. And this is where Google AdWords wouldn’t be able to count this to a converted user. But luckily, they gave us a tracking code that we can install that mimics whatever number is called right here and ports that over to the number and replace actually the number right here. So we will be able to still track conversions in Google AdWords. So let’s install this with the help of Google Tag Manager. First of all, what you would need is to have a call extension already running, then you can go ahead and go to Tools up here. And under conversions, we can set up a call conversion. So go to the plus button. And we already greeted with a tracking field for phone calls. And then we have three options here. And we will go with the option to track calls that actually happened on our website. So right here we gonna go with continue.

And we can give this all a name. We can choose a category lead is fine with me. But you might want to change this based on your website. We can assign our conversion of value, I won’t do this for now. And decide if you want to count every call that comes from a user or count the user as converted one time, I will go with every. And then there are other configurations such as when you want to count a user has converted. If the call length is longer than 60 seconds to conversion window is 30 days, and choose whether you want to include this in conversions. And also, you can choose the attribution modeling here. Don’t worry, you can always change them later on if you choose so. Let’s go ahead and create and continue. And then it will ask us how do we want to install us in our case, we want to install with Google Tag Manager. And it will give us a conversion ID and the conversion label. Now, in order to install this, we need to install a new tag that’s called Google Ads conversion tracking which is actually not quite right anymore because they already have a new tag template, which we’ll gonna use. And then also make sure you have the conversion linker tag enabled on your page. So let’s go ahead and set this up. We’ll go over to Google Tag Manager. And here we’re going to go with a new tag that we want to install. And this will be our Google Ads

Call extension tag. We’re going to find this on all pages as our phone number is on all pages of our website. But you might want to restrict this, if you just have the phone number on a certain page. Now as a tag configuration, we’re not choosing the Google Ads conversion tracking, but rather the call tracking which is a new template, which is a little bit down the page here. If you can’t find it just like me, then you might want to utilize the search functionality up here. But here we go. It’s a Google Ads calls for website conversion. This is we’re going to use and then we need to enter the phone number that is displayed on our website. And this needs to be exact because the script will actually look through the website and try to find these numbers and then replace them.

So we’re going to copy this and put us in right here. Then we need a conversion ID and the conversion label which we have right here. So let’s copy this and set up the trigger which is simplicity all pages trigger. We’ll save this. And before we test this, we’re also going to configure our conversion linker tag for Google Ads.

This tag will also be deployed on all pages, as it’s a tag to ensure that our information when the user comes from Google is correctly written to the cookie. So here we go, we already have the conversion link attack. If you have cross-domain tracking, you might want to enable this but in most cases, you will need us and we can go ahead and simply triggers on all pages. Simple as that. Now, let’s go into our preview and debug mode which will put our browser into a special mode. And if you go back to our page and reload it.

We can now see our Google Ads call extension and our conversion linker has been deployed correctly. If you have the tag assistant by Google installed, you’ll also see a new tag website called metrics. This should be deployed. Now in order to test this correctly and see if data is received in your tool, you will actually need to click on an ad and see if the phone number changes. But there’s also another trick to see if this actually works. And this is by entering a piece of code at your URL which is the hash and then Google WCC debug. This will put your browser and the code will recognize this little snippet into a special mode. So when we go ahead and reload this.

And we’re going to close down our tag assistant here we should see some. Now, this sometimes doesn’t work because it’s cached. So we’re going to go to another page here. Let’s enter our code again, Google minus WCC minus debug, and reload.

And this time, here we go. We should see if we minimize this a little window here where our Google Ads website call conversion will try to replace this phone number. So we can click on force here. And we see our phone number has been replaced. So the code actually works and would change your phone number. In the instance, if somebody came through a call extension ad through Google. But again, if you want to make sure that this is working correctly, you would need to click on your own ad in order to see the phone number being replaced. Now that we have these two tags installed, we can go ahead and submit a version and publish this to a version that all our users will now be tracked. And this is how you can install call conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager.

Yes, that’s right. This is how you can install Google Ads call conversion tracking with the help of Google Tag Manager. If you run into any problems or if you have any questions, please give there’s a shout out down below in the comments. And if you liked this video, then we have tons more on this channel. So if you haven’t yet, consider subscribing right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now, my name is Julian. See you in the next one.

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Saas Analytics Stack Recap Part 5

We have come to the end of our Saas Analytics Stack series. Ruben will be giving us a quick recap of everything we have discussed of the SaaS data flow. Plus some tips on how to manage your stack.

🔗 Links:

SaaS Analytics Stacks Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8zAPTNlJMg&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGDnOOa0biP1N7buN9BBts2

Amplitude Analytics: https://amplitude.com/

Segment.com: https://segment.com/

Practico Analytics: https://practicoanalytics.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

👍 FOLLOW US
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Welcome to our last video here a conclusion video in our SaaS analytics stack series. And just, you know, to look at everything we cover in the last few videos, you know, we start by looking at the acquisition data. This is typically everything up to the signup event. And we, you know, we use tools like segment, we introduced how segment works, what’s the main benefit of it. Tools like Google Analytics, which you are likely familiar with. And then eventually went through as a tool like amplitude. You know, some behavioral tools, you have amplitude, you got mixpanel, you kissmetrics, you have lots of options here.

Then we look at the onboarding events, right. We look at, you know, once the users sign up for your product, we want to track all the different steps that user must take to be onboarded successfully, right. And we typically do that inside some like amplitude using the funnel analysis report. And lastly, our last video, we looked at some of the critical actions. So some of the behavioral events and retention for our users, that is, are they using the product, are they adopting features, are they being retained, and we finished by looking at some of the revenue data. So these are some of the specific SaaS metrics that you might care about, like monthly recurring revenue and churn.

And some of the best ways of tackling that. So this this can be a great stack. So you know, in our stack we look at we look at a segment, Google Analytics, amplitude and then some kind of payment processor like recurly or charge me with some data box. So we’ve got about four tools there, give or take maybe five, if you include some of the qualitative data here I mentioned here like session recordings, it’s you know, it’s a relatively small stack. Really the last piece of advice I just want to mention here is to keep your stack simple you know, start small and then build upon it. It’s very easy to where the with 5-10 tools all at once especially with the using something like segment the additional tools, the cost of it can seem quite low you know, just simply make a few clicks and you enable and now you have any tool.

But always remember that there’s a big cost when it comes to learning tools, maintaining them especially if you have a team right. Getting multiple people in your team to learn a new tool can be quite time consuming and you don’t want to make them learn five, 6, 10 different tools on a regular basis all the time. So keep it small, keep it simple. And for your event data, you know, start with a handful events you know typically sounded like five or 10 events is something that can be done in an initial pass and then you build upon it. You’re always going to have gaps in your data understand that but you want to be able to tackle some of the your your your biggest challenges, or your biggest priorities and then slowly build upon that right. That can be a great strategy for success as you build out your analytics stack or your proof whatever your analytics that guest right now. I hope you enjoy the series. If you have any questions just post in the comments. I’ll be jumping through the comments and respond as best as I can. And I’m sure Julian can also offer some answers whenever possible. Once again, my name is Ruben and I’m the founder Practico Analytics and I had a grip less going over this stack series with you guys. Thank you.

 

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Retention and Revenue Reporting in SaaS Analytics Stack Part 4

We are down to the last 2 steps in the Saas Analytics Stacks. And today Ruben will be discussing the critical events and actions after a user successfully onboarded and how to use segments and amplitudes to track data for user retention and revenue reports.

🔗 Links:

SaaS Analytics Stacks Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8zAPTNlJMg&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGDnOOa0biP1N7buN9BBts2

Amplitude Analytics: https://amplitude.com/

Segment.com: https://segment.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

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All right, and welcome to our last video series, well our last major video. We will have a short conclusion video after this.

In the second video after the intro, I talked a little bit about the acquisition data in our here in our SaaS stack or SaaS analytics stack that we’re looking at here. Then I talk about onboarding in the last video. And then this video, I actually I’ll cover two things. I’ll cover the critical action section. This is typically where you find things like behavior analysis, retention, and then a little bit of the revenue, right?

SaaS is, of course, a special case when comes to revenue, just love very specific SaaS metrics, like monthly recurring revenue, annual recurring revenue, and so on. So we’ll talk a little about how to track those and what’s the best way of have a tool to the stack to look at those numbers.

Let’s start with critical actions.

And critical actions really is at this point, the user has onboarded, let’s say they onboarded successfully. And now we want to understand how they actually use the product, right? Are they using it in a regular basis, whether it’s daily, weekly, or monthly.

And are they retained. Are they coming back, or do they love the product, right.

And this can be a very broad area but we’ll focuses specifically on on critical actions. So some of the most popular things that users love about the product, from a product perspective, or from a product manager perspective.

This can be things like feature adoption and things like that it can influence your product roadmap.

And then retention which is our are they, you know, are you sustaining each of the product and of course, retention, very similar, but look at a few reports.

Now for events, it’s quite broad. So we have critical events and action. So this means that were some of the critical actions for your product, they need to track here.

In our example, reason of a job search site and we’re looking at employers specifically. So employers were posting jobs to hire people.

In their case, they’re critical actions are things like the job posted, the end of the job has successfully filled a job, and things like that. So there’s you know, there’s always a handful, maybe five or 10, critical actions that really explain or understand what the product is, and what users can do with the product.

Then for user attributes, we’re looking at some behavioral traits. And this will also be very specific to your product. For example, this could be things like, how many jobs has this company posted in total, right? How many jobs have been canceled, how many jobs have been successfully filled.

And then how many people have been hired, maybe how long the context of events, right?

These are traits that explain the behavior of a given user a company within the product, right?

From a quality perspective, you may also see something like NPS score, again, we’re looking at customer satisfaction, or how much people love the product.

An NPS score can be an easy way to get started in this kind of world.

From a technical perspective, once again, will keep building on this idea that we talked in last video about tracking data from the server side, likely be the best long term option for your company. But if you can’t, and if you’re in if you want to submit that’s a little bit quicker, a little bit faster, client-side can still work, of course.

In our stack will be the same as before, we’ll use segment and we’ll use amplitude to track our data.

So once again, here segment, I cover quite a bit the acquisition video, but we’re going to flow the data from either get from a JavaScript stores like a client side implementation, or maybe from a server side into the different analytics tools here.

Now, the first report we can look at here is an event segmentation report. And we’ll look at just the most popular events within this account. Right. And when we look here, we get to see events like you’re, you know, searching for candidates, they on board and so on. Right?

So we have a few different things, things that are most popular actions here. And we can filter things out, you know, we might not really care about the viewer loaded page.

We may care about a job application, or searching and and so on. Right? So this case give us a sense of where the most popular actions users are doing within the product in comparison to other actions, right? Are they searching for candidates as much as they’re posting jobs? Or are they successfully filling jobs as much as they’re posting them, right.

And here we are using little bit some of the filters available to us. And we’re looking at only employers, and specifically if person signed up. We know we can have employers who actually didn’t sign up at all right? We just started the funnel and it just never completed, right. That’s one event. And there’s a few different things you can do here right. We can do different ways of filtering and slicing the data. But we just really want to get a sense of where some of the popular actions within the product.

Then the second report, we have retention report. And this report, we can look at a corporate analysis, right. So we’ll start by saying show me all the new users.

And then show me the users that return and perform any active event. So an active event can vary for your product. But this is typically some kind of critical action, it may be posting the job, it might be filling a job, whatever that is. Viewing the page, firing the page view, those things typically don’t qualify here.

In this case, down here, we of course have different user types, we’re actually only looking at employers. We can also do it through the filter type, as we said before. Or we could do it like this, this you get roughly the same result. And here we see our retention curve, you might be a little more familiar with a more cohort analysis curve, right?

Where we have a numbers here, you know, how many users filter criteria on on this week? And then was the retention over time?

And same thing. Once you define the retention, and the frequency that is, you know, what makes the user retain, right?

And then how what was the frequency of users for your product.

That is should they be used on a weekly basis, monthly basis and so on. A typical example here is imagine something like a food ordering app, right, like skip the dishes, fedora, or whatever it would be available, wherever you’re watching this.

You know, for user to be retained for this kind of product would they have to order food once a week, once a month, once every two weeks, once a day, Right? You kind of figure out what is the expected usage for the majority of the users and you of course, have power users who are going to do them what’s more often, and maybe you should do it less. But this starts to play a little bit into , you know, this retention report.

One more thing I was going to show you here on the behavioral traits. So we have our default amplitude properties. But then we have things like this. So this is one of the behavioral traits that we might have, you know, this product, for example, has credits, there’s people buy credits to be able to post jobs. So you can have credits, you know how many jobs slots are remaining. So we have that limit on how many jobs they could post any given time, total job post, total jobs slots, things like that, right? So these are all behavioral traits that are very specific to this product. But from here, we can start to build more constant segmentation, right? Let’s see for users to post them more than 10 jobs, how’s the retention change compare to users who post less than two jobs.

Those are the kind of questions you can start to explore once you have the data in order.

Then our last step here in our SaaS Analytics stack is our revenue data. Right. And in here, we you know, for events, we’re really looking at some kind of subscription event, right?

So this is our user who starts a subscription. And of course, the subscription by renew on a monthly basis or annual basis or any other kind of frequency you might be looking for.

Typically, for that event, we’re looking at things like what’s the plan there on, what’s the amount, the frequency,

Sometimes it’s even helpful to track the old plan if they’re upgrading, right, or if they’re upgrading or downgrading. And I can give you a way to that track how many people are upgrading or downgrading, what’s the most typical upgrade, downgrade path and so on.

And for user attributes, then we’ll track also tricks around subscription. So these are things like what’s the plan there on, what’s the frequency, how much revenue have they had with the company, all these kind of things. So these are all very revenue specific trades. And subscription data by far and large should be tracked server side, right? We talked about here where you may have an option depending on what kind of capacity you have with your team plus description data ready for the best acquisition should be done server side. And this typically can be done by firing from an API. Sometimes you have integrations from popular payment processors but somebody should be aware of. In terms of a stack, we got segment, we got amplitude, and we have recurly here as an example. But there’s quite a few options here recurly charge me. We’re actually be looking at one called Data box. In essence, these are tools that help you process payments. And they also give you a lot of metrics out of the box. So there’s a lot of payment processors like recurly charge me and so on. But they’re designed for SAS companies.

So they’re able to create a lot of analytics dashboards out of the box for you and calculate logic for you. Typically the logic around when the user returns, when when the user renews, doesn’t renew, all this kind of things can be quite complex is still up in the beginning. And it’s really not needed because you can get them with a few clicks, right.

So our typical report will look something like this, right, we can see how many new subscriptions happen. And this month, how much new monthly recurring revenue, total subscriptions,

total monthly recurring revenue, why we get some comparisons right here, right compared to the previous month, break down by plan, want to grow by plan, and so on, right, we get some other metrics. So these are all things that you could go out and find the formula online for this and work them out and so on, and likely even recreate a lot of these metrics insights into like amplitude.

But it’s just in the beginning, you’re better off just taken some kind of pre-built report and get them done. And as I mentioned, you can you can build upon them.

In amplitude, what the you know, you can track the revenue data in amplitude and that really is just to be able to tie it into everything else.

So you have all your users who onboarded, all the users who are retained, can you then confirm their the revenue, Right? Can you say, you know, are most active users are also our users with the most revenue? Or maybe there’s maybe it’s not right. So in here, you’re taking the revenue data, the revenue events to analyze the product and product usage.

But when it comes to revenue metrics, like monthly recurring revenue, and so on very specific SaaS metrics, you you likely be better off looking at something like a custom dashboard from your payment processor.

That’s really it. We’ll make a short conclusion video to finalize everything. But that’s the final two steps in our SaaS analytics Stacks, our critical actions and our revenue.

Hey, Julian here from measureschool. If you want to follow along with the next video in this series, then we have it linked up right over there. And if you want to learn more about the data-driven way of digital marketing, then definitely subscribe to our channel right over there. Now, my name is Julian, see you in the next one.

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🔴 New GTM Feature: Trigger Groups

Trigger Groups are the newest edition to Google Tag Manager. Let’s take a look at this new feature.

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In this video, we’re going to talk about the new Google Tag Manager feature of trigger groups. All and more coming up.

Hello there measurers. Welcome back to another video of measureschool.com teaching you the data-driven way of digital marketing. My name is Julian, and today we want to talk about the new Google Tag Manager feature of trigger groups. Now, what are trigger groups exactly? It is just that a new trigger type where you can take your existing triggers and put them into a group. Now all of these triggers need to turn true for your trigger group to turn true. And if you have that attached to a tag, then new tag would fire.

This is particularly helpful if we wanted to have some kind of control structure where we pieced together our control structure from different triggers. I’m going to show you an example right now on how you can utilize this.

So let’s dive in. Here we are on our demo shop. And we have a landing page here. And on this landing page, I want to fire a tag when the user scrolls down this long landing page and actually reads it. So I would utilize a timer trigger to fire up, for example, on five-second mark.

But then also a scroll trigger to fire on the 50% mark. Now, if both of these conditions turn true previously, then I want to fire our tag. So what tag are we talking about. We are here in our Google Tag Manager account under tags, I have a GA scroll event tag. And now I need to attach a trigger to it. And if I will just take our triggers of the scroll 50% and the timer trigger 50% and attach it to the tag, these would evaluate actually or underneath each other. So that would mean that if we attached them to the tag, either, when the five second timeout would fire or the 50% mark would fire our tag would fire so it would find actually two times which is not desirable. We want to combine them and this is where these new trigger, the new trigger type of trigger groups come in.

So we go here on new, and we can choose this new trigger group right here. And let’s name this correctly. So this is a group for our scroll and our time, five second time. And we’re going to attach our existing triggers that we have the time, the trigger that have prepared beforehand, and our scroll trigger right here.

Now you can optionally put in another condition. So this would be a third condition not really a trigger, but the condition for that trigger group to put in and say that it should only trigger in these certain circumstances. But since we have these triggers inside already, we should be able to make this work within just the trigger.

So I’ll just go with all conditions. And I’m going to save this year. So now we have a new group, scroll and time a trigger.

Just to show you the other triggers that I have set up beforehand. So this is a normal titled trigger that will fire upon the five second mark. And then I also have a scroll trigger that fires on the 50% vertical scroll. So if I’ve scrolled 50% down, it should fire. Now this is now attached to a trigger group. So we have a new kind of relation between triggers in each other, that is something to look out for.

But this should do it, we have it now prepared, and we can attach it to our Google Analytics, scroll trigger tag. Now this isn’t just a tag test tag, it’s not really a Google Analytics tag. I just wanted to test this and put this into a new group.

Let’s save this and refresh our page. Okay, so we’re here on our landing page, which is pretty long. I’m going to reload this. And now I’m going to start reading the text. And before I hit the 50% mark, the GTM time as you see down below here has already fired so the five seconds are up. And once we hit the 50% mark of our scroll trigger, we should have another event which is our GTM scroll depth so we had 50% now. And then our whole triggered group turn true, which is the new trigger type of trigger group. So a new event here in the data layer, and our scroll event, track tag fired.

So not on the individual events of the triggers had fired. But on our new GTM trigger group. Let’s make a negative test here. Let’s say I’m just a casual user coming to the landing page and scrolling down really fast, should be already at hundred percent now. Our scroll trigger fired, our timer only fired after five seconds. So you would have these combined, if both of them turn true. That’s important to understand.

Okay, obviously, I would play with the time if you really want to make this this work and also the scroll depth. But you could if you increase the time, filter out all those people who don’t take longer than 30 seconds to actually to read to the half or the bottom of the page.

So you can make your scroll trigger more accurate. We have another video on this at use a little bit different method but here you exactly the differences here because we can utilize two trigger types in order to combine them to one with our trigger group.

Another example that is common nowadays is to use cookie consent pop up. So we have one right here where you would allow cookies that would set a cookie and your browser we have here on the application in the developer tools, we have a new cookie that is now put into where is it?

Okay, there’s no cookie yet because I haven’t allowed it yet. But if I click allow cookies, we should have a new cookie here, which is our consent status allow. Now I’ve built simply a variable that is a first party cookie that reads this cookie. So I will be able to see in my developer tools here ahhh my in my variables that the allow cookie consent is denied or is true.

Right now it’s deny. If I reload it should be cookie consent status true. And then I could build a trigger of that which I have already on. So here’s allow, which I’ve already done. In the triggers is cookie consent status allow.

So this is a normal page view trigger with a cookie consent status contains allow. Now, if I combine this, for example, let’s say I want to only fire up my facebook pixel not on all pages, but on all pages only if the user has already allowed this cookie, then let’s go ahead and build this into a group. So we’ll be able to first of all, look at the cookie consent status. And then if this is true fire on our pages. Let’s try this out going on to the trigger and building a new group trigger for our page view and our cookie allow.

So this is what we’re going to combine, we’re going to have the page view trigger, and no not the page view trigger in a group. So it’s going to trigger groups, build a new page view trigger on all pages, and also attach our cookie consent allow right here. So these two conditions need to be true in order for it to fire. Let’s save this, go back to our facebook pixel.

And only fire this on our group. So I’m going to get rid of the all pages trigger, and instead use our group for our page view allow. Let’s save this and refresh. Go back to our page here. And the two conditions of the two triggers will be evaluated and then our trigger group should fire and our pixel is allowed. Now, let me get rid of this little cookie here. Cookie consent status allow, then Select. OK, let’s close this and go back to the page.

Now if I reload, or if I go to the page, normally, we should see that our page you fired, our GTM tag fired and so on. But our facebook pixel has not yet fire because we have not yet allowed this consent. Even if you go to the next page and the next page and the next page until the user actually clicks this allow cookie. So now it’s allowed and the next page view would then actually fire the facebook pixel.

So this is how, let’s see, Yes, here it does. Click the something. Okay, the trigger group is now facebook pixel has fired. So this is how you can utilize your consent cookie as well. And put this into a group in order for your tags that you want to have fired only if consent is given, you can do that.

They are obviously different other methods of doing this now. But this, this whole group trigger thing actually gives us more flexibility. In order to have different methods available. We could also put this into a variable, we could put this into the trigger itself, we could use tag sequencing. So many different forms of the firing the trigger and making sure that only when the consent status is given our tags would fire.

And there’s also a method of doing this on the tracking side itself. So in the tracking code itself, Facebook actually has a feature for that. We have a video on that as well on how to make use of that.

But if you have a special case where you want to utilize different trigger conditions, and you already have these triggers set up, I think this is a very helpful feature that makes our life a bit more flexible and easy in certain circumstances of all costs. All right, if you have any other use cases for this new trigger type of trigger groups, I’d love to hear from you. I just came up with some of these on the spot and wanted to present them and get this new video out there right away so you will be up to date. If you want to stay up to date with all and everything that we do here on this channel, then definitely hit that subscribe button right over there because we bring you new videos just like this one every week. Now my name is Julian till next time.

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Amplitude Analytics for Onboarding Tracking | Part 3 SaaS Analytics Stack

The third step in the Saas Stack Analytics process is onboarding. Ruben will be walking us through the onboarding metrics we should track and give us an overview of how we can see those in Amplitude Analytics.

🔗 Links:

SaaS Analytics Stacks Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8zAPTNlJMg&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGDnOOa0biP1N7buN9BBts2

Amplitude Analytics: https://amplitude.com/

Segment.com: https://segment.com/

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/measureschool
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All right, let’s keep moving on to our third video in our SaaS analytics series. In the second video, we cover the signup and login so basically the acquisition steps. And in this video, we’re going to focus on the onboarding. So in step three here. Now, onboarding for a typical SaaS product typically means a series of steps after user signs up. So they create an account. And then they have to complete some kind of funnel to be able to use the product, right, this is where they might create a profile, they might upload photos, they might go to a product tour, it kind of varies. And then for companies, this might mean a completely self-designed, self-contained funnel, right. With special screens, special pages that if the user doesn’t complete, they can’t actually use the product. Or it might mean being guided through just the regular product through like tool tips or things like that, as a lot of different variation you can take. Nonetheless, in our analytics, we want to know the performance of this onboarding funnel, right.

So when we look at the events that we want to track here, we’re looking at the what we call onboarding events. So let’s imagine that you have a funnel, and the funnel has five steps, right.

And for the user to be considered onboarded they need to complete all the five steps, right, and they come right after, right. So we’ll have five events here. And under each event, we can have, you know, onboarding, step one, step two, step three, so on and we have any relevant properties under each event.

Then for the user attributes, it’s always helpful to track the onboarding completion that has the user onboarded successfully. This eventually becomes useful in things like notifications, where you can say, Okay, let me send a special kind of messages, or stop sending special kind of messages to anyone who has already onboarded, right. It’s common for SaaS products to use, let’s say email drips to complement any existing onboarding and funnel so you can stop those drips by having a just a flag, a true or false slide here.

And then the other thing that we might see here into the qualitative data will be something like user record this, right.

So if we are to watch users go to the funnel can be quite helpful. It can give you a sense of worries against stuck. Typically, you know, when we see a lot of issues and onboarding funnels it tends to come to expectations or the design that UX design of the funnel itself.

That is a user sees something and then not sure what that means, they’re not sure why they should do it, or why they should care, you know, why do you think the create profile right now, they can just do it later, things like that. So session recording should give you a sense of that because then you’ll be able to see if user is spending an unusual amount of time on a step that in your perspective as simple, just a couple of input fields, enter information, move on and the user gets stuck. So that would be actually quite helpful, right.

In this case, for data tracking this actually done on server side, and this one should be the recommendation.

So in the acquisition side, we saw a lot of things that needed develop client side just to be able to manage at this properly. In this case, we can adjust our moving server side. And that can be quite helpful especially if you have a cross-platform product that you have a product of mobile web, iOS, Android, so on.

Trying to implement everything always client side will become a little tedious, especially if the same action can happen on any platform. So this is where we can start to build some expertise around tracking events for the server side. If you can’t do that if client side is your recommended approach, where you want to do, that’s fine. Just be aware of that potential limitation.

In our tool stack is similar to what we saw before, we have segment, of course, we still want to funnel all the data through segment. And then the main tool that we use for analysis here will actually be amplitude, right, which we saw a little bit before the acquisition video.

So here’s a segment again I won’t cover this in detail cause I covered this quite a bit during the acquisition. But same thing today will flow here what is from a client side of JavaScript, or a new source, like a, like a server-side source, and it will flow down into all the different tools. And we specifically care about amplitude in this case as our behavior analysis tool.

So jumping into amplitude, really, the report here that we care about is the funnel analysis report.

And it looks like this before we show you how it’s built. So we have the series of steps. And then we can see the drop off from step to step right. Now, in this case, our steps, right, user starts the sign-up, they complete the signup, we saw this event quite a bit during the acquisition video, right, as a pretty critical event.

And then we have all the onboarding events. And you can see here, we like to prefix events with the word onboarding. And that just makes it easier to find, it organizes nicely, actually, a lot of tools will organize events alphabetically, so you can find them on one section. So this is just a minor detail that becomes quite helpful when you start working through data. So we have what the you know what the steps are. And, of course, these are relevant to the product itself, that we’re looking at this job search product.

And then the last event here is profile approved, right? So we have 3, 6, 7, 7 onboarding events in this case, right?

Something is about amplitudes that we can actually look at the events in any order or is this specific order, right. I have seen probably quite a bit of issues when you actually have to force an order, right, when it’s okay, users have to complete this one, and then that one, and then this one that one. Basically, what that means is, if for some reason, you have an optional event. Let’s imagine that you’re asking the users to enter a credit card, but optional, right, you have an event called onboarding enter credit card, but they can skip it, then all of a sudden now the steps down below might actually they will be counted, if you’re forcing it to be very specific order, right, because there it’s looking for that flow, and if any event skipped, then your numbers will be slightly off. So any orders can be helpful because I know users can technically go back and redo events, and they’ll still be counted as a whole, okay.

In the funnel itself, this is what it would look like, right. So we see a number then we see the drop-off, you know, the biggest drop of course when the user starts to sign up, but they’ll complete it. And then we go to the onboarding itself, in this case, is onboarding, this is actually quite, quite simple, quite well done. You can see there’s not a big drop offs, except maybe from the last step, or the second last step to the very last step, right, to get the profile approved, right. And, of course, just before we can click into things, and we can see, you know, the 57 users who complete it. We can also see the 26 users who didn’t complete it. And we can see some of the other things. Some of the interesting actually something like user pass.

So we can see, you know, for users who complete a profile approved, what do they do after, right, what were some of the path it take after. And that path explosion can be can start to help us understand maybe a better onboarding flow, right, which is typically in a typical one of the goals you start with, with something that you know, works, and they want to move on to something that might be a much better optimize, Of course, before here will have conversions by dates, right.

We have average time in between steps, right, and so on. So we’re able to segment things here.

That’s really it, we can now see conversion over time. So we can see the overall conversion actually of the funnel over time. So if you see if that’s, that’s getting better or getting worse over the last 30 days, 90 days, 6 months or so on. And then time to convert is typically also a helpful report, we like to see, you know, are you just taking a long time to go through this funnel, or is this something happening with a few minutes, and this is something that you’d likely want to play around a little bit of dates, you might have outliers are really bring it down your averages status. You might find 95% of all your users complete the funnel in a few minutes.

But then you have 5% of very small amount of users who take 25 days, right. That is they started and they come back 20 days later. So you want to play around here a little bit of time to get a sense of how long it’s taken to, to convert, right.

And we gonna foresee the conversion time between specific steps too.

So we have a lot flexibility here. And of course, just like before we can segment this even further, we might want to look at only users on iOS or only on Android or web or maybe from a specific country and so on. So all our segmentation options that we cover a little bit in the first video was are still available here and this is it right. This is this what onboarding is for our series and what the goal is in terms of our data.

Hey, Julian here from measureschool. If you want to follow along with the next video in this series then we have it linked in right over there and if you want to learn more about the data-driven way of digital marketing then definitely subscribe to our channel right over. Now, my name is Julian. See you on the next one.

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Acquisition Analytics for SaaS (Segment.com and Amplitude) | Part 2

After a brief overview of the SaaS Analytics stacks, let’s proceed to the first step of the SaaS process, the Acquisition. Here is where measuring the Sources and Signup of the prospect and later customer. Ruben is going to show you Segment.com, Google Analytics, and Amplitude.

🔗 Links:

The SaaS Analytics Stack with (feat. Ruben Ugarte) | Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8zAPTNlJMg

Segment: https://segment.com/

Amplitude Analytics: https://amplitude.com/

SaaS Analytics Stack Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8zAPTNlJMg&list=PLgr_8Hk8l4ZGDnOOa0biP1N7buN9BBts2

🎓 Learn more from Measureschool: https://measureschool.com/products

🔀 GTM Copy Paste https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gtm-copy-paste/mhhidgiahbopjapanmbflpkcecpciffa

🚀Looking to kick-start your data journey? Hire us: https://measureschool.com/services/

📚 Recommended Measure Books: https://kit.com/Measureschool/recommended-measure-books

📷 Gear we used to produce this video: https://kit.com/Measureschool/measureschool-youtube-gear

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LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/measureschool

Hi there, and welcome to our second video in the series. Now, the first video was really just an introduction video and give you a sense of what we’re going to be talking about. In this video, we’re going to dive straight into acquisition, the very first step in our data flow chart from before. Really what we’re talking about the first two rows, so marketing website visits and then the signup step. And sign up, it’s really likely the first major step that we will be looking at here, the very first major action they user has taken as they create an account, they provide an email this our trial where a sign that might be for your product.

So let’s start by looking at the very first step marketing website visit. And this is just a user coming to your website and viewing a page on your website. So it might be like a landing page, or a blog, or a pricing page, or something else.

At this stage, we want to track a regular page view event. And this just fires every time a user loads a page, any page on your website.

Alongside that event, we want to track things like the geographic data, like the city of region, maybe some demographic data, which you may have seen Google Analytics, things like age ranges, gender and things like that. At the user level, we want to track things like UTM parameters. And this is what we use to track marketing campaigns. So if a user come from a Facebook ad, or organic search, or display

ad, or retargeting this how we’re going to store that information. So we’re able to have a sense of things like what was the last touch users had before they signed up, or what was the first touch, or if you’re a more higher level, or you have higher volume of traffic, you might be looking at multi-channel attribution. So how different channels play a different role in the conversion.

And same thing, geographic and demographic. Now, you’re going to see sometimes that data between the event data, which are actions, and then the user data might overlap like we see here, track data at the right section, but we’re still going to track it. At sometimes this will function different roles. And it’s just regular good practice to even if it feels like it’s it’s duplicating the functionality that you might already have.

Now different tools. The very first tool we’re going to look at here is segment.com and segment is really at the abstraction tool. The most common use case for segment is imagined that you have a multiple tools on your website. So you have analytics, you have the facebook pixel, you have intercom, and you have amplitude, which we’re going to talk later on. So those are five different tools. So it’s five different snippets that are being loaded. And they will really could use the same amount of data, right. So if you have event data you want to track, you can really send it to all them, you know, Facebook will use it for conversions. Same with intercom, same Google Analytics, and so on.

So stuff manually implemented every single tool and every single event data over and over again. So doing it for Google Analytics, and then Facebook, and then intercom, and then amplitude, and then Google.

You can do it once for segment.com and it’ll translate it for you, right. So they’ll they’ll take the day you send them, and they’ll translate in the back end for Google Analytics for Facebook, and so on. So it gives you a little bit of obstruction, as we like to say.

And it also helps you change tools, right. Let’s say, eventually, you want, you don’t want to use intercom anymore, you want to move from that to custom audio, for example. Now, instead of having to rewrite all your calls from scratch, the stuff that you wrote, now, you can just simply enable or disable each of those tools in the in the segment back end. And the data will just keep flowing naturally because again, you didn’t write any specific codes for intercom, you wrote code for segment. Now, let me show you a little bit about how that works here.

So we’re in here for the segment back end. And all this data mobile show is from a client, they have a marketplace for employers and candidates, things like Monster.com, or a job posting site, really. So they have we’re looking at their data. So let’s actually go back one step.

So segment, you wanna think about two concepts, or think about things from a two concepts. You have sources, what day is coming from. So it could be a website, an app, maybe some kind of software, like Facebook, maybe you want to pull cost data from Facebook, or campaign data. And we have this niches where you want to send the data to right, you want to send to Google Analytics, you want to submit to amplitude, mixpanel, or 250 plus options that can be listed here. So in this case, we have a JavaScript library. So it means we’re doing something on the website.

And we have five destinations. So if you click into the the JavaScript, here we can see all the data is flowing through segment, right, if you go to a debugger, we can see data in real time. So here’s an event, we have the event name, which calls for candidates, and then we have all this event properties are flowing through, right. We can also enable, for example, this is a regular page view. And here we have an event which could load the page, we have information about the the URL of the page, the employer, the page name, and so on. So this data is flowing through, right, because you build the schema. So we see all the events that have actually formed through overtime, and just some other, you know, data purpose events, when it is when last seen the candidate, and so on.

And then let’s go back here, all the data is flowing to destination. So every destination has specific settings. So if you have been Google Analytics, for example, you’ll see, you know, you have an option to the tracking ID or the mobile tracking ID or server tracking ID. And then you have basically every possible setting, you might want to enable that you might have the option of doing it, if you were manually implementing Google Analytics. You get option here inside segment, right. So you can do custom dimensions, you can do custom metrics, you can do enhance eCommerce, you can do user ID, you can do custom sample rates, pretty much every possible option can be done here, right. So you don’t have to manually edit the Google Analytics code, you can just enable or disable something and say, you know, you might use a sample rate, this will typically done behind the code level, maybe just simply enter the number one here and change it. And that’s, that’s the power of it. And then we’re going, of course, add destinations with your route destinations. And that’s and the data will still flow through into any destination cause segment will convert it for you, right.

So that’s really the power of segment. So it’s quite handy. Now, there’s no charts here, there’s no visualization, there’s nothing, there’s an analysis and segment, it’s just a pipeline. Data is just flowing through.

And we’re going to do all our analysis inside this specific tools, right.

So if we jump into Google Analytics, we’re going to see the data forms of segment into Google Analytics from the website. And we’ll see typical things you might expect here, right, we still have the acquisition reports, we can see user data, new user, session rate, pages per session, all the typical stuff you might expect, right. So that’s, that’s the first stage. So we have two tools we have segment and we have Google Analytics. And now we can analyze all the marketing web services. The second stage we will look at is the sign up, it’s just a bit special because it’s really that transition period between acquisition and onboarding, which we’ll talk in the next video.

The signup stage, the in here, we want to have a signup event. So this would be like a signup completed, or something else. And typically will track things like name and email, maybe during the trial, like a 14 day trial, 30 day trial, maybe they don’t have a trial, they actually bought a plan ahead of time, right. So if they were forced to enter a credit card, so that could be store here. In the user level of the user attributes, we have things like name and email, trial status when this was created. And then we have a special thing called user ID. And this is really the ID of the user that we want to track. So at this point, users are not anonymous like they were in the previous stage. Now, we can actually know who they are, right? So it’s John Smith, and their ID is 1234 now we know that so now we can actually store that.

Another user ID, you know, there should be a you want to use a permanent ID so typically look like a database, it is pretty good. Emails work is technically an ID, but he was can change. So then as permanent as something like a database ID. So your development team can help you here.

Then, in terms of tools, we still have segment with Google Analytics, you know, Google Analytics can get that sign up event. So for example, once we have to sign up event, we can have a goal. So we look at, you know, registration, and then we can see the different conversion here for different channels against that specific goal. So this is that event flowing into Google Analytics. And then we can also flow into a new tool. And this case will be flowing to amplitude and amplitudes is a category of tool called behavioral analytics tools.

And this just helps me analyze what’s happening in your product. So questions like onboarding performance, retention, feature adoption, these are all things that this category of tools can offer can offer here you have amplitude, you have mixpanel, and a 20 plus options that we could probably come up with, and that are supported by segment. So you do have quite a bit.

For examples we’re going to use, we can use amplitude and we’re going to show you one report here. So when great charts ministry, the segmentation see, we have quite a few things here. And a segmentation is the is a classic, typical report.

So we’ll take that same supplement that’s fine to Google Analytics. And now we can see the progress over time. So we see that, you know, on the number 13, we had 57 users sign up for our product. And we can then view more than stacks, right? We might want to see the user path for example, where are some of the other events that users took after the sign up so maybe they onboarded, maybe didn’t onboard, maybe they ended session, how many you know how many then abort some of the for a future video, maybe user streams. So we can actually go look at specific user IDs, right.

So now it’s just like an anonymous users. Now we can actually see them by name and you know, by name and email, we can go see John Smith is the exactly what John Smith did or didn’t do after they sign up for the product, right. So we have a lot of different options, we can we can filter those we can group this by city, by region.

We may only want to look at specific marketing sources, right. So specific UTM parameters so this all here as we start to create charts and analyze it. And this is a more of a visual what’s going on chart we can create funnels and a few other things. But the important thing is the data is still flowing to segment so we still flowing through everything from segment and most of the stuff here will actually be client side too.

As it will be tracked through a JavaScript library like you saw in the example for a second before. And that’s really it. That’s the very first two stages, the marketing website visit and the signup stage at the acquisition level in the three tools that you have in your stack up to this stage.

In the next video we’ll look up onboarding. Some of the reports you might see there and some of the events that might be relevant there. Stay tuned for that.

Hey, Julian here from Measureschool.If you want to follow along with the next video in this series, then we have it linked up right over there. And if you want to learn more about the data-driven way of digital marketing then definitely subscribe to our channel right over there. Now, my name is Julian. See you on the next one.

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